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June 11, 1976 - Image 14

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-06-11

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Poge Fourteen

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, June 11, 197 6

Pbge Fourteen THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, June 11, 1976

Hays unconscious after pill overdose Hectic auction marks
BARNSVILLE, Ohio (/P)-Rep. and improving," Clawson said in Clawson said she believedI
ayne Hays, center of the con- Washington. But he had not re- Hays took the overdose of Dal- avid sBoo s finale
...,..-., .1..r.. n...«. .1 gaui^-" e u..-- connion esarrn c er ueuign ,+rt lisa s vveu' 47n'oay ','a

W

gressional sex scandal, tooK an
overdose of sleeping pills and
lay unconscious in a hospital last
night. It was not known whether
he had attempted suicide, his
doctor said.
Hays, 65, was comatose and in
guarded condition, the doctor
said. He said the vital signs
were stable.
DR. RICHARD Phillips, Hays'
physician, said it was not known
if the overdose was accidental
or deliberate. Phillips said it
"probably wouldn't have been a
problem" if the Congressman's
health had been better. Phillips
did not elaborate.
"He took an overdose of medi-
cation," said Carol Clawson, an
aide in Washington. "We don't
know how much he took, and we
don't know if it was taken in-
advertently or not." She said
no suicide note had been found.
Clawson said the pills were
prescribed for a stomach ail-
ment.
HAYS, embattled chairman of
the House Administration Com-
mittee, was listed as "stable

gained consciousness after being
taken to the Barnesville hospital
between 10:30 a.m. and noon
yesterday.
Elizabeth Ray, then an em-
ploye of the alministration com-
mittee, said last month that she
was being paid a $14,000-a-year
secretary's salary to be Hay's
mistress. Hays fired Ray, then
admitted having a personal re-
lationship with her but said she
was paid to be a secretary and
nothing more.
The Ohio Democrat is the sub-
ject of a federal grand jury in-
vestigation and a House ethics
committee probe into the allega-
tions that he misused House
funds in employing the 33-year-
old Ray.
HAYS HAS been under intense
pressure from House leaders to
quit as chairman of the powerful
administration committee, and
last week he quit as chairman
of a House Democratic Cam-
paign Committee after party
congressional candidates ex-
pressed fears of being linked to
Hays.

mane wednesuay nignT. a-
mane, a sleeping pill, had been
prescribed in connection with a
stomach disorder, diverticulitis.
Hays was taken to the hospital
in an ambulance summoned by
his wife. Mrs. Clawson added
that Hays had been particularily
troubled by the stomach dis-
order for the past five or six
days and had not been eating
well.
SHE SAID it had not been
determined whether the number
of pills he had taken would have
had the same effect had Hays
been eating well and in stronger
physical condition.
He was married earlier this
year to his longtime Ohio office
secretary, Pat Peak. He ic 65.
Hays won renomination in
Tuesday's Ohio primary elec-
tion, garnering 62 per cent of
the vote to beat court bailiff
Nick Karnick who has opposed
Hays for the last three pri-
maries. This time was Kar-
nick's best showing against the
incumbent.

WHAT CAN YOUR HOME HAVE IN
COMMON WITH THE CONCERT HALL?
WELL, WITH A STEREO SYSTEM FROM HI F BUYS YOU CAN EXPERIENCE THE SAME
RICH FULL BRILLIANCE OF THt CONCERT HALL RIGHT IN YOUR OWN HOME. YOU SEE,
OMPONENTS YOU CHOSE WILL GIVE YOU THE UTMOST IN PERFORMANCE. AND OF
OURSE OUR SYSTEMS ARE ALL BACKED BY HI FI BUYS 5 YEAR SERVICE PLAN AN
UR OWN SERVICE DEPARTMENT.
OUR
I I ~ I$649.00
SYSTEM
KENWOOD KR 5400 - FEATURE FOR FEATURE, DOLLAR
FOR DOLLAR, NO OTHER STEREO RECEIVER CAN CMAL-jENW o
LENGE IT.
TECHNICS SL 23-- THIS SUPERB TURNTABLE INCORPOR- U
ATES FEATURES FOUND IN MUCH HIGHER PRICED UNITS. !
BY FAR ONE OF OUR MOST POPULAR TURNTABLES.
ADVENT LOUDSPEAKERS - THIS 2-WAY SPEAKER SYS-.
TEM MUST BE HEARD TO BE BELIEVED. FOR UNSTRAINED ADVE\T
CLARITY WE BELIEVE YOU COULD SPEND MUCH MORE
FOR LOUDSPEAKERS, BUT NOT GAIN AN APPRECIABLE
SOUND QUALITY.
AND LET US SHOW YOU A CONCERT HALL
SO VISIT US AT HI FI BUYS
618 S. MAIN ST.
769-4700
HOURS: M-F noon-9 p.m BANKAMERICARS
Sot. 9-5-

(Continued from Page 1)
"Who'll gimme $10-S-10$10-and
-a-$5-$S-there's $S-now$7-$7-and
-a $7.SO-$7.S0 ..." sing-songed
Jerry Helmer, his eyes con-
stantly roving over the audience
from atop his step-ladder perch.
A slight nod, a small gesture--
even a careless scratching of
the head - was enough to make
one the proud owner of A His-
tory of New Zealand or Living
with Plants.
Asked if their throats e v e r
got sore, Lloyd Braun c o m -
mented, "Well, sure, if we get
dry, we just call for some tea".
Braun added that, despite the
grueling pace, he and partner
Helmer thoroughly enjoyed auc-
tioneering and made a l it t I e
money on the side.
Though there was a fairly
large crowd at the start of the
auction, as the afternoon wore
on Braun and Helmer increas-
ingly aimed their machine-gun
patter at the ubiquitous book-
store reps. A few hardy souls
did stick around to buy an oc-
casional shelf or two, and their
bids would pop up interspersed
between the familiar voices of
the book-dealers.
One young mustachioed book-
looker acknowledged the low
prices but pointed to his own
skimpy resources. "There's lots
of books I want, but if I spend
an extra $5 on a shelf, it might
be $5 I need for something I
want more."
Another young woman thought
up an original (if somewhat
forceful) scheme to keep t h e
prices down on certain shelves.
"If I was going to bid, I'd just
sic Bart on 'em (the auction-
eers) to get a lower price" she
joked, pointing at her lolling
German Shepherd.
Not everybody at the auction
was there to buy books, how-
ever. Some came on business;
others, for sentimental reasons.
Sandra Hazlett, partner in the
law firm Hazlett and Judge,
came to the auction in her of-
ficial role as federally-appoint-
ed trustee of the auction. She
struck a somber, though realis-
tic note amid the bustling sur-
roundings.
"All the money gotten here
goes to the creditors," she ob-
served. "This is a bankruptcy
auction, after all." Hazlett es-
timated the expected take of
the auction to come to about $8,-

000, but declined to say how
much of the debts incurred by
David's Books would be covered
by this sum.
Asked about some of the more
unusual items being sold (a
cash register, curtain rods and
the like), Hazlett noted, "every-
thing goes - even the toilet
paper and the soap. Every-
thing's go to be liquidated."
Also present was David Ko-
zubei, former owner of David's
Books. Saying he was "used to
the idea" of bankruptcy, Kozu-
bei watched the auction with a
good-natured, calm manner. He
looked at the hustling b o ok-
store reps, and said, "they'll
neverget another cheap deal
like this".
Then, talking in wistful tones,
Kozubei talked about his de-
funct bookstore, widely known
and loved by many Ann Arbor-
ites as a diferent kind of book-
store.
"We had chairs in the place
so people could sit; there was
a nice, relaxed atmosphere, he
recalled. "Once I threw a par-
ty." Kozubei smiled with t h e
memory. "It was a masque,
everybody came all dressed up
- we had a lot of fun."
Despite the fond memories,
Kozubei professed no great emo-
tion at watching the contents of
his store, piecemeal, being sold
and carted off.
"Lots of people I know would
not come," he said, "they said
they would cry - but I'm used
to it by now," he remarked.
"But, you know, before it (the
auction) started," he said in his
lilting British accent," the auc-
tioneers came over to me and
said - 'now, you're not going to
wring your hands and shout
'No! No!' if something you es-
pecially like goes really cheap,
are you?' - I assured them I
wouldn't."
For the future, Kozubei said
he might open another store if
he got proper financial back-
ing. "That's the only way I'll
do it," he added.
It's easiest to cut fudge into
neat uniform pieces when it is
removed from the pan. If you
want to do this, line the pan
with foil with lap-over edges,
then lightly butter the foil.
When the fudge is cold, it can
be lifted out of the pan onto a
cutting board.

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