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June 11, 1976 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-06-11

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Friday, June 1 1, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

....

Quiet session for GEO
(Continued from Page 3) out creases in the major areas vious agreement, so, Forsyth
Questioned on why the Uni- of concern yesterday, GEO bar- suggested, GEO could play to
versity chose a 14 as opposed to gainer Reynolds Monach noted a larger audience.
a 12-month duration for the con- that the Union had only been in Union president Doug Moran
tract, Forsyth responded by possession of the University's denied the charge after the
saying they were offering GEO counterproposals for two weeks meeting claiming, "What we
a 'framework where we could and "on economics and affirma- planned for today took less time
start to negotiate in August and tive action we have simply not than we thought it would so
come to an agreement in Oc- formulated our approach to your we weren't prepared to discuss
tober" This would avoid exten- (the University's) proposals the other stuff. He did add,
sire negotiations during the yet." however, "The issues we are
summer months when many Forsyth accused GEO of wait- going to talk about next week,
(;t-,o members are out of town. ing until next week when the according to our schedule, might
while the University was in- meeting will then be held in a attract a larger number of in-
terested in pushing on to iron larger room according to a pre- terested people."
School board race candidates

Wakistein Sonata
Featuring - Members of Contemporary Dunce Systems
of New York City
Diallele
Featuring - Philippe Vito of Le Groupe Nouvelle Aire
of Montreal
The University Dancers
June 10, 11, 12 8:00 P.M.
too
'tec . n s' '

(Continued from Page 3)
experiments are the only way
of knowing how successful they
art.
'We have to concern our-'
seires with how many students
we'f- going to serve. At the
elementary level we have to
improve the basic skills. At the
intermediate level, we have to
sake students more proficient
in math, science, and social
stldies. More vocational train-
ing should be possible for those
who aren't going on to college
while those who are should be
able to take advantage of an
enrichment program in their
last year."
Though he, too, favors an in-
crease in the amount of voca-
tion-i schools, Harvey Jahn, a
"r: cessional educator," disa-
gree' with Liu's opinion that al-
ternotive education should be
approached cautiously.
. think we've been too long
in recognizing the fact that
kis have different learning
hehat irs and teachers have
dif(erent teaching styles. Some-
times we try to throw a kid
sith a learning behavior that
do i't really mesh with a
teacher's style so that they sit
ttri :lt semester long totally
tirs'ted with each other."
What we have to do is pro-
a more options in our schools
imm the very traditional-type
c ;i to the very informal
t pe classroom," he con-
t This is where we have
ch their (the student's)
'hetiavior with the coil-
ehavior in the class-

"An alternative these days
realty is just going back to the
traditional structured setting,"
Jahn claimed. "I think we
ought to be able to provide
more alternatives within a giv-
en school. There's a tendency
to identify a school as a cer-
tain type of school and I think
we ought to concern ourselves
with alternative programs, al-
ternative classrooms within
each given school.
"Most kids are going to be
stuck in the school that they're
assigned to," he noted, "and
if that's the case, then let's try
to offer alternatives where the
chiid's going. I think this
would bring about notable pro-
gress."
A. Edward Spitz echoes
Jahn's belief in a variety of
systems. "We're all different
people," he said. "We have
different peer relationships, dif-
ferent subcultures, and so some
can do better in one system
than another. I am concerned
with some of the costs involv-
e(', though."
"Probably the key in the next
three years," commented
Kn'hleen Danneville, "is to
keep the alternatives that we
have going - not necessarily in
the form that they are, but
evaluate them so that all the
teaching isn't done in the same
fashion."
"t've been alternative myself
in the classroom," said former
teacher Ellen Blue, who now
works as a security guard. She
con-ends that "nowadays we
don' have parental and socie-
tal support for traditional

learning. And you got these
kids in there for six hours a
day and you got to keep them
busy and absorbed," she ex-
plained.
"They're half tuned out on
you, so you got to tune them
in. It doesn't have to be goof-
off but just non-traditional
things that you do, but you get
a lot of criticism for it from
people who just want to drum
in the traditional things."
Translating ideas into fact
requires an understanding of
the budget and its limits. Blue
feels that the current board is
too reticent in accepting the
small funding that will be pro-
vided by the state this year.
"Apparently, they (the school
board) are projecting a budget
in Ann Arbor that reflects the
thinking that they're going to
get a cut in funds from the
state and that this cut of funds
is inevitable and irreversible,"
shs noted.
This cut did not have to be
accepted, Blue said. "The ad-
ministrators and the teachers
ought to get up to Lansing and
do 'ike the union leaders and
the businessmen do - lobby.
See EDUCATIONAL, Page 7
- Wrim]

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"AN UPROARIOUS ROMP---GOT THE AUDIENCE INTO
ASANPONED GLEE"
NORMAN GIBSON 4NN ARBOR NEW'
a n n arbor fnnl proudly prssnts

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