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June 10, 1976 - Image 10

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-06-10

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, June 10, 1976

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, June 10, 197&

Antitrust bill deadlock disrupts Senate

Detroit aid bill
eads to M en

WV A 5 I i 1fN ti (5 N :i P.
Majoroity leder fMiike Mansfield
said yesterday that stretched-
out Senate sessins and a bar
on connittee me etings will be
enforced until a deadlock over
an antitrust bill is roken.
He served notice on his cot-
leagues tha: the Senate would
remain in session late into the

night, reconvene at 8 am., and
meret conl Saturday.
MANSFIELD said he also
will block meetings of Senate
committees from now on, "ex-
cept for the most extraiirdinarv
reasons'
tie complained, as other sen-
ators sad in an angry debate
earlier that stalling tactics

Sumping Curch
clings to candidacy
Ciii 'Iii 0"-6from Ct"", 1, for the lDemocrts to emerge
Senate Intelligence (titsmniittee, united while the Republicans
of which be is head, completed are obviously divided," Church
its investigations. said. lie compared the GOP's
Church finished a poor third situation to the Democrats'
in Tuesday's Ohio and Califor- problems in the 1968 and 1972
nia primarie.s and second in the elections, when the party was
New Jersey "beauty contest." badly split .
Church said he anticipated
CHURCH DID not go so far President Ford will win the Re-
in supporting Carter yesterday publican nomination.
as did also rurns Wallace, .Jack- "It is never easy 1oi defeat
son, and MWbert Muphrey, but an incumbent President," he
he promised to work for unity said. "We must not be over
in his party in the race against confident. But if we stay to-
the Republican nominee. gether I think our prospects are
"Now there is an opportinity good."

were being- used against the bill
that would strengthen enforce-
ment of the antitrust law.
The bill would permit states
to sue in federal courts to re-
cover triIle damages for citi-
zens injured by antitrust viola-
tions and give the Justice De-
partirent new powers to block
urergers and conduct antitrust
investigatiions.
SENATE leaders of both
parties advanced a compromise
proposal during last night ses-
sion in hopes of breaking the
impasse.
They said it made major con-
cession to the bill's opponents.
But unanimous consent was
required under the existing par-
liamentary situation to bring it
up for consideration and sena-
tors wno have been fighting the
bill refused.
THE opponents said they
wanted to study the compro-
mise proposal overnight and
perhaps prepare a counterpro-
posal.
Debate on the bill began
nearly two weeks ago and, with
other legislation log-jammed be-
hind it, the continuing deadlock
was causing frayed tempers.

By CHRIS PARKS
IANSING (UPI)-The battle-
scarred $27.8 million Detroit aid
package, containing a $800,000
stbsidy for the Pontiac Stadium,
is at last on its tay to Gov.
William Milliken.
House leaders managed for
the second and final time yes-
terday to put together a razor-
thin majority for the compro-
mise bill.
THE MEASURE needed 56
votes for approval and that is
exactly what it got: the final
vote nas 56-49.
The key to the bill's passage
were the votes of seven legis-
lators who switched at the last
minute from the "no" and "not
voting" categories. Several of
them had voted against a sim-
ilar measure two weeks ago.
The package, which consists
of grants to a number of city
cultural, health and transporta-
tion facilities, was part of a deal
worked out between Detroit
Mayor Coleman Young and Mil-
liken. The other elements in-
cluded cuts in city spending and
a three-mill garbage tax.

"I want to reiterate that this
is not a 'bail-out Detroit pack-
age," Milliken said. "Rather
it is a measure that will foster
self-help, correct historic in-
equities that have put the city
at a serious economic disad-
vantage and provide a fair
measure of assistance for serv-
ices and activities now funded
by the city that are of regional
and statewide benefit."
"IN THE SHORT run, its spe-
cific measures will help the cit-
izens of Detroit to help them-
selves," the governor said. "In
the long run, its philosophy will
help the city and will also help
us all-because the problems of
Detroit are the problems of us
all."
Legislative leaders. originally
tied the aid bill to continuation
of the stadium subsidy in order
to attract suburban votes.
The strategy quickly ran into
trouble. The Senate removed the
subsidy and in the House, many
lawmakers balked at approving
the aid package with the sutb-
sidy.

I

I

"A Grocery store of aa Loggng C
J.R.L.C.SUPER SANDWICH $2.45
o sub is too small, so we've come 6t with a Dvo-O-Mite
Sandwich.
REUBEN $2.15 HOT SAUSAGE $1.95
Corned beef, Sauerkreut, and Swiss Italian Hot Sausane on
Cheese on Rve, then Grilled. French Roll.
HOAGIE $1.95 PFISHWICH $1.75
Hot French Roll with POLISt
Shoved Ham.L Lettuce, SAUSAGE $1.95 Served on a French Rlf
Tosatoes, Onions, Served on a French Roll with Tartar sauce
0 & V Dressino. and lettuce.
AN sadwichas erved
witHoat German Potato
2800 Jackson Road

l
,
I
J

Pierce, on Diag,
hits govt. waste

{Continued from Page 31
HE INDICATED that south-
eastern Michigan is one of the
most economically depressed
regions in the country.
"And right here in Washte-
naw County we still have un-
employment of close to 12 per
cent, which is very high," he
added.
Pierce said that reduction in
unemployment should be one of
the nation's top priorities, as
well as the restoration of trust
and confidence in government.
"IT'S VERY unfortunate that
the Vietnam War and the Civil
Rights movement have sapped
the strength of the people in my
generation," Pierce said.
"It's more unfortunate that
the people of your generation
are very despondent and skep-
tical," he told the young audi-
ence.
He expressed concern that he
has encountered a lack of trust
in his bid for the Democratic
nomination.
"I'M USED to being a physi-
cian, a family doctor," he said.
"My patients rarely thought I
was telling lies. Now I am in a

completely different role (as
politician)."
Pierce decided to run for Con-
gress because he found that
there were many problems he
could not solve as a doctor. He
felt that he could do more by
becoming involved in govern-
ment.
Pierce ran for the same Con-
gressional seat in 1974, but was
defeated in the primary election
by just 81 votes.
His opponents in this year's
August 3 primary are Delbert
Hoffman, Mary Robek, John
Spillson, and Marvin Stempien.
BaltimoreFi
f e 0
ExhilIiarating
(continuea from wage 6
you and said how great the
rapport had been.
ANOTHER group that is popt-
lar here, though I found them to
be mediocre, is the Provisonal
Theatre of Los Angeles. They
do a leftist "but accurate" in-
terpretation of U.S. history; it
consists of a series of skits por-
traying different events from
various viewpoints. They do
manage to convey theif serious
points through comical means.
The festival still has several
days to run and over 40 perform-
ances left, In spite of some of
the trash I have seen, I am de-
veloping a great hope, and even
an enthusiasm for the future of
alternative theatre.
HAIRSTYLING
TO PLEASE
FOR MEN & WOMEN
DASCOLA
Hair Stylists
A8 warsid-971-9475
E.AUniversity-662-0354
E. .Iheei'-66-9329
Mial. Viloae-781-2733

i

UAW LOCAL 2001
Executive Officer Elections
TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY
JUNE 8, 9 and 10
THURSDAY: MICHIGAN UNION MICHIGAN LEAGUE EAST QUAD
7-5:30 7-5:30 7-5:30
ALL MEMBERS ON CHECK-OFF OR THOSE WHO HAVE PAID ALL BACK DUES ARE
ELIGIBLE TO VOTE
PAID RELEASE-TIME TO VOTE HAS BEEN ARRANGED

a

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