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June 09, 1976 - Image 7

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-06-09

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Wednesday, June 9, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Wednsda, Jue 9 197 TH MIHIGA DALY Pge eve

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Recruiters: Open season on jocks
(Continued from Page 3) pected, all stress the purity of well they will fit into the pro- in college. As one football play- matters such as these, explain-
he number of seats in (Cris- their particular program. gram, and how wonderful the er put it, "It's a big ego trip ing to the students that they
er) Arena. I even sell Don "Our program is as clean University is. before, then when you get here, may not get to play, and coun-
anham, because I think he's as the cleanest hockey program you're the lowest s- s- s- on seling hem if they get disheart-
he greatest Athletic Director in the United States," says hoc- WHEN THEY COME up for the pole." ened.
round." key coach Dan Farrell "You their one paid visit, they usual-
won't find dirt here." ly get to dine out with the head The result of this is that some It is a long job - sometimes
Frieder claims that the aca- coach, are shown around town athleties, after being so care- discouraging and sometimes
emic aspect is important also, "T H E CONSEQUENCES at night by members of the fully recruited, leave in frus- fulfilling - but it appears to
"we usually check tran- of cheating are too severe," he team, and generally enjoy tration. But most stick it out pay off. With The University's
cripts"), and adds that the goes on. "At times it could be themselves. until the next year, and usually athletic program one of the top
niversity has higher grade tempting, but the long term re- get to play. in the nation and second to
*int average standards than sults are not worth it." "You're treated like a celeb- none in the Big Ten, the coach-
se of the NCAA. Frieder The football and basket- rity" says Rob Palmer, a de- R E C R U I T I N G for he es are by - and - large well-
s this affects the !recruiting ballr rrams sinre thev are fenseman on the hockey team, coaches involves dealing with rewarded for their efforts.

of some students. "If the stu-
dent becomes ineligible, there's
nothing we can do," he said.
Another coach who likes to
sell the University as a whole
is Moeller. "Michigan is an
easy place to sell," he declar-
ed. "We're the only school
that's in the top ten academ-
ically and athletically." We
have a tradition, a great name,
so we can do things the way
we like."
SINCE FOOTBALL has the
largest athletic budget the
coaches apparently do have the
opportunity to conduct things
"the way we like." But for the
smaller, less lucrative sports,
the financing and recruiting is
different.
One of the different approach-
es is espoused by Brian Eisner,
head tennis coach. He feels
that students already know that
Michigan is a good university,
and that selling himself is more
important.
"Michigan is a big, nebulolts
thing," he says. "So when I'm
recruiting you, I'm Michigan.
A person makes 85 per cent
of the decision based on the
coach," Eisner adds.
COMPLIANCE W I T H the
NCAA rules is an important
part of recruiting. There are
limitations on the number of
personal contacts allowed, the
number of times the university
can pay for the student to visit
the campus, and what can be
offered.
Following the recent scandal
at Michigan State University,
there is a hint of paranoia
among the coaches with regard
to recruiting violations. As ex-

oulp g),' r1b, 51C IY
the two "big business" sports,
are said to be the most likely
places for violations to occur.
But here too they stress the
cleanliness of their recruiting,
and Don Canham agrees.
"You only cheat if you don't
have natural advantages," he
points out, "we've never had
any problems with recruiting."
ALL THE COACHES seemed
to favor the simple approach,
feeling that the University has
enough to offer without added
incentives. Moeller did admit
however, that when an attrac-
tive prospect appears to be
sw in g i n g towards an-
other school, there are certain
things that are done.
"I don't like to say dirty,"
Moeller says, "but the schools
start to cut one another more."
"Cutting" is the practice of one
school telling the student the
bad points of the rival school.
Losing students is all part of
the recruiting game. Even the
most dedicated efforts can re-
sult in a student deciding to go
elsewhere, sometimes simply
because the weather is better.
A C C O R D I N G T O
Moeller, coaches get only a
third of the approximately 60
athletes they would like. Base-
ball coach Moby Benedict loses
many of his prospects to the
professional draft, and admits
that "recruiting is a gamble."
"You may lose all these kids
. . . and then again you may
be lucky," he said. "You never
know."
To the athletes, recruiting is
something else again. Treated
like stars by the coaches, they
receive calls weekly telling
them how great they are, how

Rob Lytle, one of his year's
most highly - recruited high
schoolers. chose Michigan be-
cause "I liked the atmosphere,
the players were like a family."
"THEY SELL the winning
tradition," said Lytle, agreeing
that recruiting is an ego trip
for the athlete.
Often, however, the ego trip
ends with enrollment-at least
for aawhile. Few freshman get
to play consistently and often
go from a position as a star in
high school to being benched

-TONIGHT-
THE SEDUCTION OF MIMI
-one of the best films of the season
MLB AUD. 3 7 & 9 $1.25
Peoples Bicentennial Commission
RC SUMMER THEATER Presents
"THE NORTH BEACH GANG"
Tuesday, June 8 - Sunday, June 13
8:0 P.M.
Friday and Saturday evening
800 and 10:30 P.M.
EAST QUAD AUDITORIUM
$1.25
ESTHA-ETAO

An AliedArtistsKelease
TODAY at
1-3-5-7 & 9
1214 s. university
Theatre' Phone 668-6416

mLk 1Athe movie AT BRIARWOOD
ADJACENT TO J.C. PENNEY +769-87800 1-94 & S.STATE, ANN ARBOR
DAILY E A RLY BIRD MATINE ES -- Adult s $1.00
MON. T HRU SAT. W0 A.M. Tiff 1:30 P.M. SUN. & HOLS. 12 NOON Tit 1,30 P.M.
STUDENT & SENIOR CITIZENS DISCOUNTS (E xc. Fr . & Sat. E ves.)>
fi 1 10:15, 1:00, 3:45,moe 1 0:30, 12:15, 2:20
6:30, 9:15 1 4:30, 7:15, 9:45
The most devastating
detecte story of this century. E n v
REDFORD/IRAND
"AlTNE PRESIDESMEN
ROCK
HUDSON
. EMBRYO
10:10, 10:30, 12:35, 3:00
13 th the 6:15, 7 :00, 9:00, 9:30
(Sorrv, No Passes) Cpl
starring 1
MARLON BRANDO
JACK NICHOLSON * K

Jose Irvo n FraAs Psn
Waldstein Sonata
Featuring - Members of Contemporary Dance Systems
of New York City
Mortine Eppque{s
Diallele
Featuring - Philippe Vito of Le Groupe Nouvelle Aire
of Montreal
The University Dancers
ndungnew wor by z.bethW Drgr, n
raec ree.A .m :: (I::
June 10, 11, 12 8:00 P.M.
ow'r (cnr for the PerFring Arts
Ard Searing $5, $4, $3
T", I A l M d I cthec (x A {x O 1 1 30 I: i'
16 61o V.G
-l

TODAY at: 1-3-5-7-9
SNSTechS5N niolrr*
TODAY at: 1-3-5-7-9
i .7
I",*
W DISNYS-

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