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June 08, 1976 - Image 10

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-06-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

M
Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, June 8, 1976

OAS REPORT RELEASED:
Cites torture in Chile

Puppy love?
It's not quite what it looks like as five-year-old Koko gives her
teacher Penny Patterson a kiss during a display at Stanford
University. Koko has been learning sign language and has a
vocabulary of about 250 words. Koko must be thanking her
teacher for anod grade.

SANTIAGO, Chile UP) -
Arbitrary jailings, persecution
and torture continued in Chile
despite international pressure
to halt the practices, says a
secret report prepared for and
circulated at a meeting here of
western hemisphere foreign
ministers.
Secretary of State Henry
Kissinger arrived yesterday to
spend three days at sessions of
the Organization of American
States. He reportedly planned
also, in private talks, to press
officials of the ruling Chilean
junta to protect human rights.
HUMAN RIGHTS are a pro-
per concern, the secretary told
reporters, because "this is the
hemisphere to which people
came to escape oppression ev-
erywhere. We can only be true
to our history and to the hu-
man imperatives of our time by
implementing the demands for
respect for human dignity."
Kissinger said he looks for-
ward during his stay "to dis-
cussing common problems in-
cluding those of trade and de-
velopment and reform of the Or-
ganization of American States,
and we also look forward to
fruitful talks with our col-
leagues from Chile and with the
leaders of Chile."
A few hours before Kissinger
arrived Gen. Augusto Pino-
chet, president of the junta, an-
nounced the release of 60 more
political prisoners.
THE SECRET REPORT

MYSTERY FAN
CHURCHVILLE, N. Y. A')
- Stephen Clarke, an English
teacher, is a mystery fan.
At Spencerport High School,
he teaches a course in detective
fiction which he created a few
years ago, and he has written
a textbook on the subject.
Clarke said he used mys-
teries as a device fr teaching
the principles of logic and or-
derly composition.

was prepared by the iluman
Rights Commission of the Or-
ganization of American States
- OAS - which opened its
annual general assembly in
Santiago on Friday.
More than a score of nations
are participating in the OAS
general assembly. Mexico boy-
cotted the meeting in protest
against the ruling junta.
The 109-page report was dis-
trib'tted to delegations before
the OAS meeting got under way
and was made available to a
reporter by delegation sources.
It said the commission was
"seriously perturbed" by the
Chilean government's response
to requests for information.
"SOME REQUESTS - a mi-
nority of them - have receiv-
ed incomplete replies. The ma-
jority of them, and very im-
portant ones, have received no
reply whatsoever," it said.
The OAS commission criticiz-
ed recent decrees by the junta
to improve the human rights
situation, including norms for
treatment of detainees.
"In conclusion we must af-
firm that the right of physical
liberty of the person, . conse-
crated by the American decla-
ration on the rights and duties
of man, continues to be fre-
quently ignored by the govern-
ment of Chile, and that some of
the standards issued more or
less recently on this subject,
seem to be intended more to
serve as instruments of propa-
ganda rather than as effective
measures for the protection of
human rights," the report said.
IT WENT ON: "While de-
crees are being issued for the
purpose of tranquilizing or con-
fusing world opinion, the prac-
tice of arbitarary jailings, per-
secution and tortures continued
up to the present."
The government of Chile is-
sued a 162-page reply saying
BODYCOM
KELLE
RECENr WORKS
June 1-30
RECEPTION JUNE 1. 7,
-ouSs T UESAY-5FRI5- AY,10 -6
WEOKFNs , 12-6
764 -3234
FIRST FLooa. MICHGA-N UNXON

the report serves to "prove the
falseness of claims which un-
scrupulous or badly informed
persons have made available to
the human rights commission".
The reply said the Chilean
government has confiscated 97,-
590 weapons since the armed
forces took power in a coup
Sept. 11, 1973, against the late
President Salvador Allende, a
Marxist.
REGARDING political pris-
oners, the government says
that 90 per cent of persons pro-
cessed by military tribunals
have been accused of illegal
possession of arms and thus
can be described as common
delinquents and not as "politi-
cal prisoners."
The Chilean government
claims it is the target of a
worldwide Communist plot to
overthrow it and cites special
broadcasts from Moscow and
other Socialist bloc nations.
"If one adds the arms at the
extremist elements to the
incitation broadcast several
hours daily in Spanish to pro-
mote disturbances and to over-
throw the government, one can
understand how far away, un-
fortunately, is the goal of com-
plete normality.
"BECAUSE OF THIS, it is
necessary to maintain legal and
administrative measures which
restrict the liberties and rights
of man in order to protect pre-
cisely the most important of all
of these, the right to a secure
life," the Chilean reply said.
The commission report in-
cludes details of what it called
arbitrary executions of persons
after the 1973 coup and also
more than 20 case studies of
later deaths of persons.
Ten of the case studies were
reported while the report was
being written and responses
were sought from the Chilean
government.
ANOTHER 12 case studies,
which the commission said
could not be investigated in
time for the OAS general as-
sembly, were also included be-
cause the commission consider-
ed the denunciations received
about these deaths to be ex-
tremely grave.
The Chilean government re-
sponded that inclusion of the
12 studies was a "flagrant vio-
lation" of commission regula-
tions since the government was
not consulted, didn't have time
to formulate responses and was
limited to making what the
commission called "observa-
tions."

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