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June 05, 1976 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-06-05

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Saturday, June S, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

.2g. ~ Agreement reached
at Anheuser-Busch

A snake in the grasp
JAsmES LANGHAMMER of Royal Oak has a rather unusual pet - a 14-foot, 160-pound An-
aconda named Annie. Langhammer has been taking care of Annie since her birth 18 years ago.
MISMANAGEMENT CHARGED:

Report
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (U)A
-A special prosecutor has ac-
caed deposed President Isabel
Fern of allowing fiscal mis-
management-during her regime
that had "no precedent in the
an of the handling of public
fin ance."
Federal investigator Sadi Con-
rad Massue, who prepared a
41-psge report for President
Jorge Videla, declared that
Per i led Argentina toward
mnrat and material hank-
rupicr
BUENOS AIRES newspapers
quoted extensively from the re-
port yesterday.
Although Conrado Massue can-
not pass judgment himself, a
federal court has already put
the 45-year-old former president
on closed trial for alleged mis-
use of public funds. The trial is
hei' conducted at the soihern
mountain resort where she is
inrisoned.
A splinter group of Paronist
guerrillas recently staged a
sm-ill - and unsuccessful -
raid to free her from her pa-
latial prison, well-informed dip-
loniatic sources said. Some of
the raiders reportedly were kill-
ed. Na official source would con-
firm this information, however.
THE PROSECUTOR'S report
said Peron admitted to never
having read the regulations re-
garding public finances, relying
on her advisers and aidds fo tell
her what should be done. A one-
ine caharet dancer, Peronn uc-
ceeded her husband, Juan Peron,
as the President when he died
/
resents:
{ LOONEY
TUNES
1937-45
Lofm b 3
i c ..ym O n -ns
Li" aCLsiOs
ai'Ei NDs nnc . Y
8A4mI :f sig 00 -10 R 0 1 0

criticizes Peron

ST., LOUIS (AP) - The An-
heuser - Busch, Inc., brewery
here was back in operation yes-
terday for the first time in three
months.
About 500 cheering workers re-
turned to their jobs late Thurs-
day night after reaching a ten-
tative contract agreement earl-
ier in the day. The workers had
been on strike since March 1
in a walkout that idled more
than 8,000 workers at nine
plants across the county. Walk-
outs continue at seven of the
plants, but agreements appear-
ed likely.
IT IS EXPECTED that it will
be several more weeks before
the production of Busch, Bud-
weiser and Michelob beer re-
turns to normal.
Art Barhorst, business repre-
sentative of Teamsters Union
Local 1187 here, said members'
of the seven locals which have
not come to terms with the com-
pany would meet to vote today,
tomorrow and Monday.
Out-of-town pickets at the St.
Louis plant, the company's larg-
est with 4,000 workers, tore up
their signs and threw them into
the street a few minutes before
midnight, police said. Cheers
broke out and the crowd moved
into the plant.
INTERNATIONAL President
Frank Fitzsimmons and Secre-
tary-Treasurer Ray Schoessling
met Thursday in Las Vegas,
Nev., with leaders of the seven
locals still on strike to decide
on whether to accept the ten-
tative agreement.
The key reportedly was a com-
promise disciplinary offer for
strikers allegedly involved in
violence during the three-month
strike.
Union locals here and at the
company's Newark, N.J. plant
had already reached agreement
with the company, but workers
at both plants have been honor-
ing picket lines set up by work-

ers from other Busch plants.
TtIE SEVEN BOTTLERS lo-
cals still to settle are at brew-
eries in Los Angeles, Houston,
C'olmbus, Tampa and Jackson-
ville, Fla., Merrimack, N.H.,
and Williamsburg, Va. They
are represenited by the National
Conference of Brewery and Soft
Drink Workers.
The original issues in the
strike at those seven were griev-
ance procedure, manning and
maintenance of standards. In
St. Louis and Newark the issue
was money.
The accepted offer was the
same package offered last De-
cember. In St. Louis wages will
increase $2.50 over the life of
the three-year contract to $9.21
an hour.
Violence during the strike re-
sulted in trucks being burned
in Los Angeles, two dozen wind-
shields smashed here and sniper
fire in Florida. More than 70
persons were arrested here
alone, mostly for blocking
trucks leaving the brewery.

in 1974.
"State funds were mismanag-
ed, without fear or decorum,
with the subsequent impoverish-
ment of the nation and the en-
guish of its people," the resort
said. "Our findings are of such
gravity that they have no prece-
dent in the annals of the hand-
ling of public finance."
It concluded: "In summary, it
seems as though the adminis-
tration deliberately omitted noth-
so that the country would reach
the abysmal limits of a chaotic
state, inclined to final moral and
material bankruptcy . ."
THE PUBLICLY quoted por-
tions of the document gave de-
tailed accounts of how the presi-
dent allegedly allowed her aides
to handle funds as they saw fit,
Meanwhile, federal judge Tulio

Garcia Moritan flew back from
the southern Andes, where he
interrogated Mrs. Peron at the
secluded mountain residence.
Peron was flown to the re-
treat - El Messidor - when the
military overthrew her in March.
A military decree allows Garcia
Moritan to try Peron there in-
stead of Buenos Aires, where
authorities believe her presence
would pose security and political
problems.
Informed reports and wild ru-
mors circulate regularly about
the deposed president, some
frequently contradicting others.
The daily Hoy newspaper re-
ported recently that an army
officer was arrested after being
observed several times leaving
Mrs. Peron's private quarters
in the early morning. Military
sources confirmed this privately.

.------ --- Ie
no one under 17 admitted
TODAY and TOMORROW at
1 -3 - 5 -7and 9

ANIMATION NIGHT
SAT. NITE SPECIAL
A variety of important American animation from Walt Disney, Max
Fliesher, Warner Bros. and several contemporary artists.
Some attractions include:
Betty Boop for President
Another Boop-with music by Louis Armstrong
and a Bugs Bunny- (with a special animated
appearance by-oh I won't tell-but to give you a
hint-he spent some time searching for a certain
bird, and some people call him "Bogie.")
& many more animated shorts.
CINEMA fII TONIGHT AT AUD. A ANGELL HALL
7:30 p.m. & 9 p.m. ADM. $1.25
BORIS KARLOFF & BELLA LUGOSI in 1934
BLACK CAT
One of the great underground horror classics of the ,'30s starring the two
most infamous and popular horror actors of the era. The film is a mixture
of necrophilia, sadism and satanism with a mad architect building a fan-
tastic structure and stashing the corpses of young girls in glass cases in its
passages. You won't see this on TV-at least not for a while.
SUN.: Free showing (at 8) of SCARFACE
starring Paul Muni & George Raft
CINEMA GUILD TONIGHT at OLD ARCH. AUD.
7:30 & 9:35 ADMISSION $1.25

TODAY and TOMORROW at
-3 - 5 - 7 and 9
a 's
AN Ate-CARTOON FEATURETTE
TODAY and TOMORROW at
1 - 3-5 - 7and 9
23 T sout Istate
Theatre hn 224

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