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June 04, 1976 - Image 7

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-06-04

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riday, June 4, 1976
Electric bills may triple

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

THE MICIGAN DILYPae.Seve

County judicial hopefuls
gear for August primary

WASHINGTON 1()-The -aver-
age household electricity bill
will nearly triple by 1985, but
only about 4 per cent of it will
be due to power plant pollution
control, says a study issued yes-
terday by the Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA).
A second EPA study says that
pollution controls on oil refiner-
ies may add about one cent per
gallon to the cost of gasoline,
heating oil and other petroleum
products by 1983.
THE TWO studies, prepared
by private consultants for EPA,
were issued by Administrator
Russell Train, who said "the
results confirm that environ-
mental regulations imposed on
these *two industries are rea-
sonable in terms of capital
availability, product prices at
the consumer level, and em-
ployment impact."
The refinery study said that

controlling air and water pol-
lution to meet federal stand-
ards could cost this industry
some $1.9 billion a year on the
average for the 10 years from
1974 through 1983, including
capital investments totalling
$5.9 billion.
This study said the cost would
add about 39 cents per barrel
to the price of petroleum pro-
ducts-less than one cent per
gallon.
IT SAID the standards may
generate a net increase of 13,000
jobs to build, operate, and main-
tain antipollution equipment,
and the oil industry should have
no trouble obtaining sufficient
capital.
The other study said some
electric utilities, already having
trouble raising caiptal for ex-
pansion, would encounter the
same difficulty covering anti-
See ELECTRIC, Page 10

fr :.Alexander

By MICHAEL YELLIN
A bounty of judicial hopefuls
are currently gearing up for
August 3's county judicial pri-
mary. The posts will be filled
in the November election.
The list of candidates has
swelled since the state legisla-
ture last month passed a law
requiring Washtenew County to
establish a new Fifth Circuit
Court by the beginning of next
year. The new court, devised
to ease the heavy work load
of- the county's judges, will
handle appeals from District
and Probate Courts, civil cases
involving more than $10,000, do-
mestic relations cases and crim-
inal felonies.
THOSE SEEKING nomination
include William Ager, Jr., in-
cumbent and unopposed for Cir-
cuit Court judge, Arthur Car-
penter, Shirley Burgoyne and
Henry Conlin for the new Cir-
ouit Court judgeship, Thomas
Shea, incumbent, and Raymond
Mullings for Ypsilanti's Four-
teenth District post, Rodney
Hutchinson, unopposed, for Pro-
bate judge, John Gillis, incum-
bent and. unopposed for the
Washtenew County area Court
of Appeals, and Dorothy Riley
and Robert Evans -for the new
Court of Appeals post.
Carpenter, a 54-year-old Ann
Arbor attorney, has launched
several controversial and suc-
cessful law suits having both
state and national effects. One
suit forced the city public school
,system to provide students with
books and other scholastic mate-
rials. In 1971 Carpenter obtain-
ed an important court ruling
giving University students the
right to vote where they attend
school. Two years ago, he was
responsible for the ruling which
invalidated the University's res-
idency regulations.
BURGOYNE, also vying for
the new Circuit Court position,
was defeated by a mere hand-
ful of votes in her judgship
bid in 1972 against Edward
Deake. She has twice been a
candidate for Circuit and Dis-

TONIGHT! MLB 3 9:00
THE KING OF HEARTS
Roman Polonski's 1967 MLB 4 7:00 & 10:30
FEARLESS VAMPIRE KILLERS
To call this film a parody of horror films, or even a loving
homage is to underrate it to an absurd degree. A far more
funny and sophisticated movie than YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN,
FEARLESS VAMPIRE KILLERS has moments of sheer gothic
horror, and it's obvious if Polanski had taken his tongue out of
his cheek completely this would have been one of the scariest
films ever made. Polanski not only shades his film with hia
usual theme of isolation and helplessness, he turns in a fine
performance as a professor's "gofer.' Jack Macaowan, Roman
Polanski, Sharon Tate, unedited.
PREMATURE BURIAL
(Raoe' Carman, 1962) MLS 4-9:00 ONLY
One of the most chilling of Corman's Poe adaptations. Ray
Milland turns in one of his finest performances as a medical
student haunted by a fear of being buried alive while in a cata-
leptic fit. Oppulantly photographed by Floyd Crosby, this film
is not for the squeamish.
$1.25 Sinole., $2.00 Double Feature Show
MONDAY: Polanski's CUL-DE-SAC 7 P.M. and REPULSION
19, AUD. A?.

trict Court judgships. In the
past, Burgoyng has had to brave
slanderous rumors and contro-
versial charges by her oppo-
nents.
"I don't have as much trouble
this year," she said, "but still
it is very difficult to win against
the Conlin name."
The Conlin name belongs to
the 43-year-old lawyer and in-

structor of Business Law at
Washtenaw Community College
who rounds out the three hope-
fuls for the new Circuit Court
post.
Conlin, who performs minor
legal work for Octagon House,
the drug rehabilitation center,
is a veteran Ann Arbor attorney
whose Irish family background
is steeped in law and judgships.

Starring DAR BYLLOYD RAIN
WASHINGTON ST.
arL~m 482-3300
THEATRE DOWNTOWN YPSILANTI

I

.,,;,

ALBERT FINNEY & SUSANNA YORK in 1963
TOM JONES
Based on Henry Fielding's tale of bawdy 18th Century England, this
film received Academy Awards for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Screen-
play, and Best Musical Score. It is the story of the ridiculous and lusty
adventures of Tom Jones, who leaves his country home for London, in search
of money, success, and happiness. On his way he encounters a colorful
assortment of scoundrels and squires, wenches and ladies, all tied together
in a comical tangle of relationships which is not unraveled until the final
scene.
CINEMA II TONIGHT AT AUD. A ANGELL HALL
7:30 & 9:30 ADM. $1.25

(4
(4
(4
(4
(4

Jose imon's
Waldstein Sonata
Featuring - Members of Contemporary Donce Systems
of New York City
MAor tne Epoque's
Diallele
Featuriog - Philippe Vito of Le Groupe Nouvelle Aire
of Montreal
The University Dancers
June 10, 1 h 12 8:00 P.M,
C r for th Po ngr
764 6 Seo2%g .5, 4
~ 54525am B 1/

-I

.--,

..

GEORGE SEGAL, JAMES FOX in
KING RAT
This seamy underside of Japanese P.O.W. camplife as po
OVER THE RIVER KWAI. Segal plays a thoroughly unsc
nist who dominates the action in closed quarters. Also st
enay.

1965
rtrayed in BRIDGE
crupulous opportu-
arring Tom Court-
CAT
OLD ARCH AUD.
ADM. $1.25

r r K n
7 v
zj:
d
,.
tf /F 1

SAT.: Boris Karloff & Bela Lugosi in BLACK

CINEMA GUILD .TONIGHTAT
7:3 &9:35T

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