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May 26, 1976 - Image 7

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-05-26

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Wednesday, May 26, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page SevS'n

'U' prof hits anti-nuclear power plan

By GEORGE LOBSENZ energy source."
PIRGIM IS presently mount-
University nuclear engineer- ing a petition drive to get the
ing prof James Duderstadt yes- initiative on the ballot.
terday criticized PIRGIM (Pub- "If the PIRGIM initiative
lic Interest Research Group in gets on the ballot and passes,"
Michigan) for issuing "grossly declared Duderstadt, "it will
incorrect" statements concern- probably be found unconstitu-
ing the safety of nuclear power tional in the courts. But more
plants. important," he added, "it indi-
Duderstadt said a PIRGIM cates a public mood."
initiative which would require "If this mood remains un-
all nuclear power plants to buy changed," he continued, "pri-
total liability insurance and ad- vate industry will back away
here to strict safety procedures, from developing nuclear pow-
contained misleading and inac- er plants and five years from
curate statements which were now, when the real crunch hits,
"dissuading the public from energy resources will drop
considering a viable alternative drastically and people will
Hays confesses
to. affair with aide

-i

start wondering why they can't
run their air conditioners all
day."
"AT THAT point," Duderstadt
added, "nuclear energy possi-
bilities will again start to be
explored.
"This (the initiative) could
throw a 20-year delay into this
particular energy resource," he
said.
The professor's chief com-
plaint about the PIRGIM pro-
posal was that it did not deal
with the alternative energy
sources now available, which,
according to Duderstadt, are
even more unfeasible than nu-
clear energy.
"OUR CONCERN with the
PIRGIM initiative," said Dud-
erstadt, "is that it doesn't tell
you what the alternatives are."
He listed three possible ener-
gy options in view of dwindling
oil and gas reserves.
"The way it boils down is
this," he said, "you can burn
coal, you can increase energy
conservation, or you can use
nuclear power." Duderstadt
does not forsee the widespread
use of wind or solar energy as

a possibility before the year
2000 excepting solar heating
units for homes.
ACCORDING TO Duderstadt,
increased coal consumption and
greater energy conservation as
possible solution present diffi-
fult problems of their own. He
sees air pollution as a major
drawback to burning coal for
electricity. As for the prospect
of intensifying efforts to con-
serve energy, Duderstadt said
such a solution to the energy
c r i sa sswouldtnecessitate a
"massive re-structuring" of
our economy that would be very
difficult to carry out.
Other purported dangers in-
volved in nuclear energy pro-
duction have been "blown way
out of proportion" in Duder-
stadt's eyes. He pointed to the
unblemished safety record of
commercial nuclear reactors
since their inception in the late
1950's as defense for his ar-
gument.
"Just for comparison," he
added, "your personal chances
of being, killed in a car acci-
dent are about 1 in 1400, in a
tornado, 1 in 2 million, and for
death due to a reactor mal-

(Continued from Page 3)
further stand by my statement
that Miss Ray is a seriously dis-
turbed young lady, and I deeply
regret that our relationship, and
its termination, has apparently
greatly aggravated her emo-
tional and psychological prob-
lems."
Hays, chairman of the House
Administrationi Committee, said
she worked for a former House
member before joining the Ad-
ministration Committee staff on
April 22, 1974.
ON FEB. 28, 1975, he said,
she left to pursue a new career
in Hollywood. On her return,
Hays said, he persuaded an-
other member to hire Ray.
"I did not inform this member
of my personal relationship with
Miss Ray, but I felt he knew
and was willing to try to help
at my request.
I explained to this member
that while she was employed by
me and in her previous job, she
was able to perform normal of-
fice duties. I further explained
that she had rather serious
emotional problems but with
help and understanding, she
seemed to be making progress."
THE CRISIS came when Hays
became engaged, he said.
"When I proposed to my new
bride, I explained to Miss Ray
that our relationship would have
to end but that I would continue
to help her in any way I could,
so long as she continued to per-
form her duties as best she
could.
"It was at this time that Miss
Ray became hysterical-threat-
ened suicide, as she had done
in the past. She also threatened
blackmail and to destroy my en-
gagement.
"WHEN THE Washington Post
story broke last weekend, I real-
ized that Miss Ray had kept her
promise to destroy my marriage
and my career," he said.
Hays said he was making the
confession to clear Ris con-
science.
"I hope that when the time
comes to leave this House,
which I love, Wayne Hays may
be remembered as mean, arro-
gant, cantankerous and tough,
but I hope Wayne Hays will
never be thought of as dis-
honest."
REACTIONS to the episode
varied. Several predicted the
exposure would cost Hays the
chairmanship of the Administra-
tion Committee, the seat of his
A glacier begins as a snow-
field. Little by little the snow
becomes solid ice. The ice
grows thicker and begins to
move. The snowfield has be-
come a glacier.

power in the House.
A political observer in Hays'
congressional district, however,
doubted he would suffer defeat
in his bid for renomination in
the June 8 Ohio primary.
Earlier, Hays criticized the
FBI and Asst. Atty. Gen. Rich-
ard Thornburgh. That came af-
ter informed sources said the
public integrity section of the
Criminal Division of the Justice
Department was looking into
reports of Hays' relationship
with Ray.
HAYS SUGGESTED the in-
vestigation stemmed from a
House speech last April in which
he criticized Thornburgh for al-
legedly saying he could not
prosecute a Republican con-
gressman for accepting an ille-
gal campaign- contribution be-
cause "he is a friend of mine."
Thornburgh denied making the
statement. He declined com-
ment on Tuesday's events.
Meanwhile, Rep. Charles Wil-
son (D-Calif.) said Ray asked
him for a job in 1974, saying
she could type and had other
secretarial skills. But he did
not hire her.
"She said she could type,"
Wilson said. "She said she
couldn't take dictation but that
she could write fast."

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function, 1 in 3 million. The
odds are about equal to the
chance of getting killed by a
meteor that hit Ann Arbor."
D U D E R S T A D T ALSO
scoffed at the possibility of ter-
rorists taking over nuclef'
plants in ordr to construct
bombs.
"There are lots more effec-
tive ways if your interest is
terrorism," he said. "For in-
stance, you could plant a bomb
at the base of a dam."
lHe also doubted the feasi-
bility of constructing a bomb.
"I would be surprised if the
entire facilities and staff of
the University of Michigan
could build a bomb," he said.
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I

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