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May 25, 1976 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-05-25

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I I I L- I v v I %.W I I I %.W-Ni 14 UPI-% I L. I

Prescription price advertising allowed

WASHINGTON (AP) - Drug-w
gists were freed to advertise
their prescription prices by a
Supreme Court ruling yesterday
that consumers have a consti-
tutional right to receive such
information.
The court's 7-1 decision aban-
doned a rule, laid down by the
justices in 1942, that the First
Amendment guarantee of free-
dom of the press does not ap-
ply to purely commercial ad-
vertising.
IT ALSO established a new
doctrine that those receiving in-
formation, as well as those con-
vey;ng it, have a right to chal-
lenge infringements of free
speech.
The justices specifically struck
down a Virginia law subjecting
pharmacists to loss of their li-

censes if they advertise drug
prices.
THE MAJORITY of the jus-
tines said the decision would
not neces'nrilt affect laws re-
tricting advertising by doctors
and lawyers.
Dissenting Justice William
Rehnquist said it would not only
lead to invalidation of those
laws, but apparently would also
apply to the ban on cigarette
and liquor advertising over tele-
vision.
In other actions, the court:
-Ruled that a state may not,
under the federal Social Security
law, require a minor on welfare
to obtain parental consent in
order to receive free contracep-
tives or birth control informa-
tion.
-Agreed to hear arguments

next fall on whether the Con-
stitution prohibits severe cor-
poral punishment in public
schools or, if it does not, at least
requires that a hearing be held.
- Agreed to decide whether
federal courts may award retro-
active seniority to minority race
employes because of past dis-
crimination against others of
their race.
- Put off until its 1976-77 term
a decision on whether programs
which provide benefits for tem-
porarily disabled workers must
include pregnancy in their cov-
erage,
THE COURT'S opinion in the
drug advertising gcase was writ-
ten by Justice Harry Blackmun,
a former Mayo Clinic lawyer
whose remarks from the bench
often indicate a strong interest
in medical subjects.

"Those whom the suppression
of prescription drug price in-
formation hits the hardest are
the poor, the sick, and particu-
larly the aged," said Black-
mun.
He said it would be simplistic
to deny First Amendment pro-
tection to such advertising on
the grounds, invoked by the
court in its 1942 decision, that
it was "commercial speech."
BLACKMUN wept on to say
expressly that truthful adver-
tising which does "no more than
propose a commercial transac-
tion" is entitled to the First
Amendment guarantee of press
freedom.
"The particular consumer's
interest in the free flow of com-
mercial information ... may be
as keen, if not keener by far,

than his interest in the day's
Most urgent political debate,"
he said.
Rehnquist took issue sharply.
"IT IS UNDOUBTEDLY argu-
able that many people in the
country regard the choice of
shampoo as just as important
as who may be elected to local,
state or national political of-
fice, but that does not automati-
cally bring information about
competing shampoos within the
protection of the First Amend-
ment," he said.
Blackmun said physicians and
lawyers do not deal in "stand-
ardized products" as phar-
macists do but render services
"of almost infinite variety and
nature." Consequently, he rea-
soned, advertising in these fields
would be more likely to lead to
confusion and deception.

TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY
"ALL YOU CAN EAT"
ENGLISH STYLE FISH 'N CHIPS
includes unlimited trips to our famous salad bar and hot
loaves of our home baked bread.
ADULTS... . . ..$3.44
CHILDREN..$1.95
(under 12)
Served Tuesday and Wednesday 5 p.m.-11 p.m.
West Bank
at the Holiday Inn West
' 2900 JACKSON RD.
665-4444
CANTERBURY HOUSE
IN THE SPRING TERM
LUNCH AT CANTERBURY-12 noon to 2 p.m. Monday through
Friday in May; THURSDAYS ONLY IN JUNE
We provide the place and beverones. YoU bring your lunch. Nothing scheduled--lust
o pleasant place to have a brown boo lunch. (Note chance: Thursdays only in June on
June 3. 10. 17. 24.)
C. G. JUNG DISCUSSION GROUP-Alternate Wednesdays, 8 p.m.
Open to reaular or occasional attendance by anyone interested in the thought of C. G.
Juno. Meets May 26: June 9. 23: July 7. 21: August 4. 18.
COMPANY OF FOOLS-First meeting Potluck Dinner, Thursday,
May 27, 6 p.m.
Onooino aroup to leorn and shore the craft of the Fool Grew out of the visit of Ken
Feit to Ann Arbor in April. Join us for play bnd plannino-bring friends and some food
to shore.
GAYNESS AND SPIRITUALITY GROUP-Each Sunday, 7 p.m.
People of may spiritual paths who relate positively to their own ocvness. Improvizational
theater rerformances on May 30. Potluck dinner on June 6 at 6 p.m. (Note different
time for June 6 only.)
HEALING AND WESTERN MEDICINE-Discussion on Friday,
June 4; 8 p.m. herb tea, 8:30 p.m. discussion
Gory Richwold will give a presentation on June 4 entitled "Reflections on Healing and
Western Medicine" continuing Canterbury's series of prooroms on the connections
omona physical, psvcholooical, spiritual and political healing.
ALL EVENTS AT CANTERBURY HOUSE,
218 N. DIVISION STREET
corner of Catherine and Division
FOR INFORMATION CALL 665-0606

Television viewing tonight

6:00 2 7 11 13 News
9. Beverly Hillbillies
24 ABC News-Sarry Reasoner
50 Brady Bunch-Comedy
62 I Spy-Adventure
6C:30 4t3 NBC News-John
Chanceltor
9 News
11CBS News-Watter Cronkite
20 Daniel Boone-Adveature
24 Partridge Family-Comedy
50 I Love Lucy-Comedy
7:00 2 CBS News-Walter Cronkite
4 Bowling for Dollars-Game
7ABC News--tarry
Reasoner
11 Brady Bunch-Comedy
13 Hogan's Heroes-Comedy
50 Family Affairs-Comedy
a6 Woman
67 Spraking of Sports
7:30 2 Name That Tune--Game
4 George Pierrot-Travel
7 Price s Right-Game
9 Room 222
11 Don Adams Screen Test
-Game
13 Adam-12-Crime Drama
20 Stump the Stars-Game
24 $25,000 Pyramid-Game
50 Hogan's Heroes-Comedy
56 Evening Edition with
Martin Agransky
62 News
3:00 2 Making af All the
President's Men
4 World at War-Documentary
7 24 Happy Days
9 On the Evidence--Drama
11 Bugs Bunny/Road Runner
13 Fabulous Funnies
29 It Takes a Thief-Adventure
50 Merv Griffin
56 Lowell Thomas Rembers
-Documentary
62 Movie-Science Fiction
i:30 2 11 Good Times
7 24 Laverne & Shirley
-Comedy
30 56 57 Consumer Survival
Kit-Report
9:00 2 11 M*A*S*H
4 13 Police Woman-Crime
7 S.W.A.T.-Crime Drama
9 To Be Announced
20 700 Club-Religion
30 57 Opera Theater
56 Olympiad-Documentary
9:30 2 11 One Day At a Time
50 DinahI
10:00 2 11 Switch-Drama

4 Dean Martin-Comedy
7 24 Rookies-Crime Drama
9 Celebration-Music
56 Monty Python's Flying
Circus
02 PTL Club-Religion
10:30 9 Open Roads
20 Practical Christian Living
56 Mark atJaz
11:00 24 7 t11324 News
9 CSC News-Lloyd Robertson
20 Alfred Iliteheock-Drama
50 Best of Groucho-Game
561 tt's Vane Turn
57 woman
11:20 2 4 7 it 1324 Presidential
Primaries
9 News
20 JACK BENNY-Comedy
50 Movie-Drama
56 57 ABC News-Sarry
Reasoner
12:00 2 Mary Hartman, Mary
Hartman-Serial-Charlie
learns that Loretta may never
walk again. Charlie: Graham
Jarvis.
4 13 Johnny Ca-son
7 24 Mystery of the week
9 Movie-Drama
11 Movie-Thriller
62 News
12:30 2 Movie-Thriller
1:30 4 Tamorrow-Tom Snyder
7 13 News
1:50 11 News
2:20 2 Movie-Drama
2:30 4 Classroom
3:004 News
3:50 2 News
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVI, No. 15-n
Tuesday, May 25, 1976
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan News
phone 764-0542. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published dai l y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-
ters) ; $13 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.
Summer session published Tues-
day t h r o u g h Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: 6 50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.

p, - j / - '" IRV
"WHERE YOU CAN
ALWAYS FIND SOMETHING
YOU FORGOT THAT YOU-
WERE LOOKING FOR."*
j 2.-
S16S.Stato AxwArboi,ML.481O8
fine books bought and sold

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