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May 22, 1976 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-05-22

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Poge Two~-

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturdoy, May 22, 17Q-7 6
,

Page Two"''-- THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturdoy, May 22, 1976

Retail food prices up in April

Reports link RFK
to CIA Cuba plot

WASHINGTON (a - Retail
food prices went up in April
for the first time this year,
pushing over-all consumer pri-
ces up four-tenths of one per
cent, which was double the con-
sumer prices increase in March
the government said yesterday.
However, the behavior of
prices so far in 1976 remains
well within the government's
forecast for the year of a six
per cent inflation rate and a
two to five per cent rise in food
prices.
C O N S U M E R S had to
pay more in April for fresh
grits and vegetables, coffee,
11ryns tha yt ms-as
ruCing r tha n ernatilpo-
aJ companies with complete names
samtefeindtie occsp osnsl, Select.
:on sto yost chface. o t-at-o
:satedvsbtesno. All nmates. Fl.
. Caldf., Hawaii, N.Y'., N.J., Sc, Amer.
alcompales.ihcmleenms
ica, etc
We your resume profession-
ally. IM esecutive typing
1 00*tine printed resumes
1 *printed cover letters
CoenpeteFee: $30 nothing extre
aSend che th your bio and em-:
".ploymnt background.
:C (As3tan-t33 a
"P.Q. Box 64, .n "
r T ne, N.J. 3
P"..o.........

pork, poultry and dairy pro-
dtcts as retail food prices rose
six-tenths of one per cent. Food
prices had declined during the
first three months of 1976 by a
total of two per cent.
Prices of commodities other
than food rose three-tenths of
one per cent, the same as in
March, while prices of services
rose five-tenths of one per cent,
the smallest increase in eight
months.
On the negative side, the La-
bor Department said the buying
power of workers' paychecks
declined by nine-tenths of one
per cent in April, the biggest
drop since November of 1974,
when purchasing power fell 1.1
per cent during the depth of the
recession.
IT BLAMED the decline on
inflation and a decrease in
hours worked, coupled with no
change in hourly earnings.
Workers' real spendable
earnings still were 3.8 per cent
above a year earlier, but a con-
tinuation of the loss of buying
power could slow the surge in
consumer buying that has been
the major factor in the na-
tion's recovery from recession.
The Labor Department said
its Consumer Price Index for
April stood at 168.2, meaning
that goods that cost $100 in
1967 were priced at 168.20 last
month.
P R E S I D E N T F O R D
welcomed the April price re-
port, saying that while prices
rose more than in March, "it
does show the rate of inflation

on a downward trend."
Prices during the 12-month
period ending in April increas-
ed 6.1 per cent, a big improve-
ment over the 12-month in-
crease a year earlier of 10.2
per cent.
Prices increased only two-
tenths of one per cent in March,
one-tenth in February and four-
tenths in January, the same as
April, for an overall-increase
in prices so far in 1976 of 1.1
per cent.
THE ANNUAL rate of in-
crease in the past three months
was 2.9 per cent.
However, government econo-
mists have said all along the
rate of inflation cannot con-
tinue at such low levels. They
say the basic rate of inflation
in the economy is probably
about six per cent and they pre-
dict price reports during the
remainder of the year will re-
flect that rate.
Economists consider price be-
havior of commodities other
than food as being more signifi-
cant in the long run, since food
prices are considered especial-
ly volatile. The annual rate of
increase in non-food commodi-
ties so far in 1976 has been
near four per cent.
THE LABOR Department had
a mixed report on fuels prices
in April, with gasoline and mo-
tor oil falling nine-tenths of one
per cent, the fifth consecutive
month of decline, while fuel
oil and coal prices rose three-
tenths of one per cent, the first
increase in six months.

DETROIT (1P) - Robert Ken-
nedy apparently was the key
number of a secret Kennedy ad-
ministration team measuring
the impact on Cuba of an as-
sassination of Fidel Castro, the
Detroit News reported yester-
day.
"U. S. Senate probers - -
accidentally have uncovered the
existence of a supersecret team
of top Kennedy administration
officials whose mission was to
measure the impact" of an
assassination of the Cuban dic-
tator, the newspaper said.
IN A copyright story written

by Seth Kantor of its Washing-
ton bureau, the News said
knowledgeable government
sources disclosed that Robert
Kennedy was the key member
of the team, which was assem-
bled before President John
Kennedy was shot in 1963.
"Existence of the clandestine
Kennedy committee was un-
earthed two weeks ago by prob-
ers of the Senate's so-called
K e n n e d y assassination
panel, headed jointly by Sens.
-Gary Hart (D-Colo.) and Rich-
ard Schweiker (R-Pa.)" the
paper said.

Television viewing toih

PARTHENON GYROS
Am wd m_ . . w itestaurml
COMBINATION GREEK FOOD SPECIALS
PLATE '$3.'75 BRING THE WHOLE FAMILY AFTER
GYROS is SHISKEBOB SANDWICHES 5:00
MOUSAKA i PASTITSIO 0 DOLMADES . SPINACH . GREEK SALADS is PASTRIES
226 S. MAIN CALL 994-1012 CARRY-OUT
ANN ARBOR WE CATER TO PARTIES SERVICE
now

6:00 1 11 NEWS
9 CBCNEWS-George
Finstad
50 STAR TREK
56 FIRING LINE
-Wilam F. Buckley
62 GINO WASHINGTON
C:30 2 11 CBS NEWS-Dan Rather
4 13 NEWS
7 24 ABC NEWS-Ted Koppel
S POLICE SURGEON
20 MOVIE
"Golden Boy"
62 ROLLER SKATING
7:00 2 TRUTH OR
CONSEQUENCES
4 PROFILES IN BLACK
7 DETROIT
3 SPACE: 109
11 BABAR COMES TO
AMERICA
13 50 LAWRENCE WELK
24 SPACE: 1999
56 AUSTIN CIT LIMITS
7:30 2 etaoinR
62 FISHIN'HOLE
7:30 2 $25,000 PYRAMID
4 11 BASEBALL
7 OUTDOORS
62 OUTDOORS WITH KEN
CALLAWAY
8:00 2 JEFFERSONS
7 24 GOOD HEAVENS
9 THIS IS THE LAW
13 EMERGENCY!
50 MOVIE-
"Boy on a Dolphin"
56 TRIBAL EYE
62 REV. JOHN-Discussion
8:30 7 DOC
7 24 MOVIE-
"On a Clear Day You Can
See Forever"
9 FRANKIE HOWERD SHOW
20 MORRIS CERULLO
KELP LINE
9:00 2 MARY TYLER MOORE
9 KOPYCATS
13 MOVIE-
"The Call of the Wild"
56 TO BE ANNOUNCED
9 SIDESTREET
20 LESSON-Pat Robertson
50 LOU GORDON
56 MOVIE
62 MOVIE
'The Black Torment"
62 FUTURE SHOCK
9:30 2 BOB NEWHART
20 TEMPLE BAPTIST
CHURCH
10:00 2 11 CAROL BURNETT
4 BACHARACH IN THE

PARK
10:30 20 CHARISMA
11:00? 4 711 13 NEWS
9 CBC NEWS-George
Finstad
20 WARREN ROBERTS
24 ABC NEWS
11:15 7 ABC NEWS
9 PROVINCIAL AFFAIRS--
Reportt
24 APOLLO
11:20 9 NEWS
11:30 2 MOVIE-
"Sidekicks"
4 MOVIE-
"-South Pacific"
7 MOVIE-
"The Undefeated"
1l MOVIE"-
"A Raisin in the Sun"
13 MARY HARTMAN,
MARY HARTMAN
Cathy's wedding plans are on
again after Dennis tells why
he kissed Mary (2 hrs., 30
min.
50 MOVIE-
"Tomb of the Living Dead"
12:00 9 MOVIE
"The Cockeyed Cowboys of
Calico County"
1:00 2 MOVIE-
"The Creature Walks Among
Us"
11 NEWS
1:30 7 MOVIE-
"Desert Hell"
2:00 13 NEWS
2:30 2 MAYBERRY R.F.D.
3:00 2 NEWS
3:30 7 SOUNDINGS
4:00 7 NEWS
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVI, No. 14-S
Saturday, May 22, 1976
Is edited and managed by students
at the tUniversity of Michigan News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published d a i l y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-
ters) ; $13 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.
Summer session published Tues-
day t hrough Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6 50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.

SUNDAY & MONDA'Y
All You Can Eat"
FRIED CHICKEN
Includes unlimited trips to our famous salad bar, choice of potato
or vegetable and loaves of hot home baked bread.
ADULTS . . . . $3.44
CHILDREN (under 12 . . . $1.95
Served Sunday Noon 'Til 8 P.M.-Monday 5 P.M.-11 P.M.
CIestBank
at the Holiday Inn West
2900 JACKSON RD.
665-4444

ThE FIiNAL !DAYS
S NIXON'S LAST DAYS IN OFFICE
By WOODWARD and BERNSTEIN
Retail Prce $11.95
Centicore Price $8.95
LIMITED TIME ONLY
Centicore Bookshops

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