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May 05, 1976 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-05-05

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, May 5,, 1976

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, May 5, 1976

STARTS TONIGHT-
IT'S NOT TOO LATE TO ADD:
"WOMEN IN EDUCATION"
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backpacks, belts, buckles and
Walter Dye moccasins.
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Just off S. University

Court repeals Council pay

By MIKE NORTON
At least one argument was
taken out of City Council's
hands last Fridav, when Circuit
Jud ge Patrick Conlin ruled that
Council members are not en-
titled to pay.
Conlin i-sid his decision in
resroo-se to a suit filed by Jim-
mie Hunt of Ann ,Arbor. Who
contended t h a t the salaries
gien to Council members were
illegal.
THE OURSTION of pay has
been a bone of contention in the
city since Jamuary, when a
Compensation Commission cre-
ated by the Council recom-
mended that thhe ten members
receive annual salaries of $5000.
Republican council members
immediately challenged the rec-
ommendation on groTnds that it
violated the city charter, which
states explicitly that council
members "shall serve without
pay.'
Democrats answered that the
business of the Council demand-
ed full-time attention, and that
only paid members cold afford
to devote enough time to city
government.

THE PAY issue played a large
role in the March elections, and
may have helped elect the pres-
ent Republican City Council ma-
jority.
In his decision, Conlin reject-
ed the argument of the Council
when it set up the Compensa-
tion Commission under a state
law which permits local govern-
ments to manuever around such
anti-pay regulations as that in
the city charter.

The judge argued that the
intent of that law was not to
allow municipalities to get
around their charters, but to
give them alternative methods
of paying officials who were
entitled to compensation.
Although Hunt filed the law-
suit as a private citizen, he has
been a long-time Republican
activist. He was represented be-
fore the court by John Laird, a
former Republican councilman.

May Festival, PSO
wow Hill audiences

(Continued from Page 7)
cluded Ravel's La Valse, a
suite from Copland's Billy the
Kid, Sibelius' Symphony No. 7,
and Rhapsody in Blue by Gersh-
win, some less - known works
pere performed. Leslie Bas-
sett, who teaches at the Uni-
versity of Michigan, was com-
missioned by the Philadelphia
Orchestra to compose a work
for the Bicentennial. The re-
sult: Echoes from an Invisible
World, Three Movements for
Orchestra. The subtitle's am-
biguity is representative of the
work, as beyond the fact that
there are three movements, the
work appesred on first hearing
to be little more than a show-
piece for superb orchestration.
An unecessary addition to
the otherwise well - balanced
protram was the waltry Invita-
tion to the Dance, an Ormandy
transcription of the coy piano
work by Weber. Separated

from La Valse only by the Cop-
land, the piece sweetened the
program beyond palatability.
Perhaps Ormandy hoped to re-
wardtheaudiencehfor broad-
ening their musical tolerance
with the Bassett.
Some of our past - digging
that has been inspired by the
Bicentennial has unearthed
American pieces that make us
aware of our relative youth.
One such example is the Mac-
Dowell Concerto No. 2 for Pi-
ano and Orchestra, as perform-
ed by soloist Andre Watts.
Aside from a little stuffiness
in the Gershwin, there was
little to criticize in these per-
formances. The Philadelphia
Orchestra is still one of the
country's toe--notch ensetmbles,
and any one of their perfarm-
ances of a work just rounld be
the dfinitive one. Definitive or
not, it is awvays a ,:tas eur to
hear their version.

T HE
UERVICLE:
1. Find someone who has a freezer.
2. Put a bottle of Jose Cuervo Gold in it.
3. Go away.
4. Come back later that same day.
5. Open the bottle and pour a shot of the
golden, viscous liquid.
6. Drink it with grace and dignity.
Or other people, if they re not around.
OSE CUERv *TEQUIL A, 80PROOF.
IMPORTED AND B TTLED BY @195. HEUBLEINtNC..HARTFORD.COctN

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