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May 19, 1976 - Image 7

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-05-19

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Nednesday, May 19, 1976 THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Ford, Carter dominate in Michigan

Page Seven

(Continued fron Page1) ,
"To win in Michigan is a
very good victory," a reserved
Carter told his campaign cham-
pions in Detroit. "I think by
the end of next Tuesday we'll
reach the goal we set for our-
selves before Pennsylvania -
that's 1,000 delegates."
PRIMARIES WILL be held
next Tuesday in Idaho, Oregon,
Kentucky, Tennessee, Nevada,
and Arkansas.
Washtenaw County voter turn-
out was estimated at 50 per
cent.
"I would have thought that 40
per cent was a lot," said County
Clerk R o b e r t Harrison last
night. "Udall has stirred up
more than expected."
UDALL, WHO was the only
candidate to campaign in the
county, won every precinct in
Ann Arbor as did Ford.
"You can't imagine how hap-
py I am," Ford told his state
campaign staff in Lansing from
phone in the nation's capitol.
"This is going to put us on the
road to that victory in Kansas
City and that victory in No-
vember.
"This was a team effort," he
added. "I learned a little about
team play at the University of
Michigan."
11EAGAN failed to contact his
supaorters at Detroit Metropoli-

tan Airport, but John Sears, his
nayional campaign manager, told
the crowd of 100 that the for-
mer California governor did
better than expected in Ford's
strongest territory.
"We've done one hell of a job
in getting over 25 per cent of
the vote," Sears declared. "We
succeeded in scaring the day-
lights out of the people in Wash-
ington."
Citing a Michigan comeoack,
Udall last night released the
results of a private poll taken
it days ago which ranked Car-
ter ahead in Michigan by 52 per
cent to Udall's 19 per cent.
"WE CAME to Michigan and
the mayor (Detroit Maror Cole-
man Young) was against us,
some of the leaders of the UAW
and the AFL-CIO were against
us," Udall said. "We were thirty
points down. We had something
else on our side-the good peo-
ple of Michigan who refused to
be stampeded.
"The Udall team is a bunch of
fighters, not quitters," he con-
tinued. "We're not all that flashy
but we're solid. I say you watch
the Udall campaign go in thesw
next weeks. After tonight we'lt
be over the 300 (delegate mark).
it's row clear we've passed Sen.
(Henry) Jackson (in delegates)."
Speaking at Ford headquar-
ters in Lansing, Gov. William
Milliken said, "I am proud

President Ford's home state has
given him a resounding victory
and his campaign a timely boost
that should help carry him to
victory in Kansas City. From
the heartland of America his
come a signal that President
Ford has the leadership and
trust that appeal to a 'road
cross-section of voters, an ap-
peal that will return him to the
White house."
This story was compiled bt
Ann Marie Lipinski, Ken Par-
sigian and Jim Tobin with files
from Daily staffers Susan Ades,
Michael Blumfield, Philip Bok-
ovoy, Lani Jordon, George Lob-
senz, Mike Norton, Jenny Mil-
ler, Michael Yellin and Bar-
bara Zahs, and wire service re-
ports.

k-,oming SOwu.
The Jackson Road
Logging Company

l i i i : i i i i i i i i i i '' +r 0 0 0

Battle for delegates
months from finale

WASHINGTON (UPI) -Presi-
dent Ford got the big double
primary win he badly needed
last night, hut itWs still a long
way to the Republican National
Cenvention in Kansas City.
Voters in Ford's home state
apparently heeded his call for
support at the lowest moment
of his campaign. And there
were no indications of a heavy
crossover by George Wallace
Democrats to Ronald Reagan as
there were in Texas and Indiana
earlier this month.
FDRD WON'T have long to
savor the victory. The primary
scene shifts from Maryland and
Michigan to the South and West
-the heart of Reagan's "sun
belt- strategy"
The momentum Ford gained
this week could be quickly dis-
solved next Tuesday. He faces a
stiff challenge in six primaries
on a single night - Tennessee,
Idaho, Kentucky, Nevada, Ore-
gonu and Arkansas.
And the following week--Mon-
tana, South Dakota and Rhode
Island-isn't much better.
ON THE Democratic side
Jimmy Carter's bandwagon was
slowed a little bit last night with
Edmund Brown's win in Mary-
land. The California governor
accomplished what he sought
out to do-win a victory in the
East to give a base on both
coasts to stop Carter.
Carter still has the strong
delegate lead, and held his mo-
LAST CALL
for mixed leagues
Sign up now.
UNION LANES
OPEN 11 A.M.

mentum by edging Morris Udall
in Michigan.
THE PRIMARY season that
started in the snows of New
Hampshire Feb. 24 will be all
over in three weeks on "super
Tuesday." O a single day Cali-
fornia, New Jersey and Ohio
select one-sixth of the delegates
to the two conventions.
In both the Republican and
Democratic races, California is
by far the most important, and
the differences in party rules
may spell the differences in the
nominations.
California's Democratic dele-
gates are divided proportionally
on the results of the primary,
so Carter should get a share, no
matter how well Brown does in
his home state. But the Repub-
lican contest is winner take all
-and could be a big lump of
167 delegates for Reagan.

THURSDAYS-FRIDAYS AND SATURDAYS
A FUNNY
THING
HAPPENED ON THE WAY To THE FoRUM
2 Hour Musical Comedy. Cast of 14.
CAFE THEATRE Yotir DINNER TIIEATREI
(show only) Ch(dinner & show)
. Admission $4.50-$3.50 (students) Sam pin Dnner and Theatre Packages
* Cocktail Service Available Before Show (To e Chosen on the Evening You Arrive)
and During Intermission $ 0 45 Sumptuous Seafood & Salad Bar
t In-The-Round Seating Assigned in the All 'ri and French Onion Soup or New
Order of Phone Reservations Received Inciud England Clam Chowder
e Curtain Times: Thursdays-8:15 2 Hour Show $ 9 75 Southern Fried Chicken
Fridays-8:15 Saturdays-8:00 & 10 45 & $10 45 Broiled Chopped Sirloin Steak
* Please Specify "Cafe Theatre Only" Unlimited $11.00 Broiled Filet of Flounder Almnondtine
When Phoning in Reservation Sea'food & $11.25 Boneless Breast of Chicken
Parmesan
nc Salad Bar $11 .45 Chicken & Ribs
ANN AREOR INN Also Available
Huron & 4th Live Maine Lobster- Alaskan King Crab Logs
Prirme Ribs of Beef-Beef & Shrimp Teriyaki
A NN A R BO R, M IC H IG AN - Steaks and Many More
Please Specify "Dinner and Theatre" Res-
RESERVATIONS--769-9500 ervation When You Phone

200 years of American Art in a single visit
1 s 1
1779-80 1907 1962
Peales Wfashington at Princeton Bellows Stag at Sharkey's Wailos 100 Cans
For the Bicentennial year, the Art Institute presents the only survey of American From May 6 through June 13
art in the nation - 70 of the greatest masterpieces done by our artists: Heritage Wed., Thurs., Sat., Sun., 9:30 am.-
and Horizon: American Painting 1776-1976.Four of America's finest museums - 5:30 p.m. Fri. only 1 p.m.-9 p.m.
Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, Cleveland Museum of Art, Toledo Museum General Admission: $2. Students,
of Art, and the Detroit Institute of Arts - selected the best works from their Seniors $1. Members and Children
American collections. The result depicts 200 years of creative American accom- under 12 FREE. High school students
plishment. 3-5 p.m. weekdays FREE.
Also, twQ related shows: Words and Thoughts, letters, photographs, and
diaries from the Archives of American Art, and American Fashion, 19 Historic
Costumes trom the Metropolitan Museum of Art .. ON-
If ever there was CN~f ""r" ":
anatso o oThe Detrit Institute of Arts anat h i s isit

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