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May 05, 1976 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-05-05

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, May S, 1976

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, May 5, 1976

ACCOUNTING AND
FINANCE MAJORS
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BECOME A CPA

ERA opponents work hard

By LANI JORDAN
Although the Equal Rights
\mendment (ERA) is within
tor states of the thirty-nine
needed for ratification, its op-
position is increasing.
Many groups such as the Na-
tional Organization for Women
(NOW) are pushing to have the
lRA ratified by the 1979 dead-
line, but others which oppose
the amendment have been
w"tln .just as diligently to
prevent its passage.
In Michigan an attempt is

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being made to rescind the 1972
ratification of the ERA. Bills
designed to do this have been
introduced in both the House,
by Rep. Josephine Hunsinger
(D-Detroit), and the Senate, by
John Welborn (R-Kalamazoo).
QUESTIONS HAVE been rais-
ed as to the legality of rescind-
ing the amendment in Michi-
gan. According to Prof. Ter-
rance Sandalow of the Univer-
sity law school, "Nothing legal
prevents it. Nothing in the
Michigan or Federal constitu-
tions says that it cannot be
done. The purpose of amend-
ment procedures is to see that
the opinions of the people are
expressed through "their repre-
sentatives."
In the past few months the
issue has been debated on sev-
eral Detroit area college cam-
puses by Stop-ERA, an organiz-
ation whose purpose is to re-
scind the ratification, and the
Committee for Defense of the
Equal Rights Amendment (D-
ERA). According to Mary Jo
Vogel of DERA, "the commit-
tee is staging activities "to
make it a public issue."

NOW is also attempting to
bring attention to the ERA by
sponsoring a picket line at the
state capital on Saturday. Leg-
islators will also speak on the
issue. On May 16, NOW mem-
bers and other ERA supporters
from all over the country will
meet in Springfield, Ill. to
march in favor of ratification
and to attempt to prevent re-
peal in other states. The ERA
comes up for vote in Illinois
this month.
"ITS PASSAGE," said Vogel,
"would unlock doors in other
states."
Stop - ERA takes the stand
that there is no legal need for
the ERA. Their position states
that the amendment will give
women nothing they do not al-
ready have.
"Other legislation which has
already been passed, such as
the Equal Pay Act have made
the ERA obsolete," said Elaine
Donnelly, head of the Michi-
gan Stop - ERA movement.
"We want to have someone pre-
sent testimony on the legal ef-
fects of the ERA. We want
proof of actual laws which dis-

criminate against women."
According to Donnelly, Stop-
ERA is willing to discuss the
issue openly but has encounter-
ed difficulty in arranging de-
bates with their opposition.
"Thus far," she said, "DERA
is the only group which has
even been willing. Women
have a right to hear both sides,
even when the other side
doesn't want to comply."
"THE ISSUE raises too much
emotionalism," Donnelly con-
tinued. "We are hoping for a
hearing. What we want is
calm, rational, discussion and
debate on the subject."
The Stop - ERA movement
is at a disadvantage because
"the other side is more fund-
ed," said Donnelly. The United
Auto Workers contributed mon-
ies to enable more persons to
attend the march in Illinois.
Stop-ERA relies mainly on
"hard work and fund - raising
events," according to Donnelly.
"I also want to make it
clear," said Donnelly, "that
we are not a right-wing organ-
ization. We aren't sponsored by
anyone."

Ma Bell to raise rates

By CHRIS PARKS
LANSING (UPI) - The 10-
cent phone call has gone the
way of the dime cup of coffee,
candy bar and newspaper in
Michigan.
The state Public Service
Commission (PSC) yesterday,
in granting Michigan Bell Tele-
phone Co. a $52.2 million rate
increase, authorized the utility
to hike its pay phone charge
from 10 cents to 20 cents - the
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first such increase since 1952.
T W E N T Y -C E N T
phone booth calls will be effec-
tive as soon as the company
can gear up for the change.
The PSC also axed free basic
service for Bell's board of
directors, but allowed the
company to continue giving a
50 per cent discount to em-
ployes and retirees,
The telephone giant's
proposed rate package fared
considerably better than recent
requests from Detroit Edison
and Consumers Power Co., but
company officials were still
unhappy.
BELL PRESIDENT David
Easlick said the rate increase
was not enough to pull the com-
pany out of its current finan-
cial difficulties, and pledged to
ask for yet another new price
hike.
In the meantime, however,

the company will be forced to
make further service reductions
"in order to live within our
financial means," he said.
PSC Chairman Daniel Dem-
low said the rate order was
designed to keep the costs of
basic service as low as possi-
ble to give Bell's three million
customers "the opportunity to
chose less service and receive
that service at less cost."
THE INCREASE in the basic
monthly charge, therefore, was
only 1.5 per cent while the
overall rate increase was 6.2
per cent.
Monthly charge increases
varied from 5 cents to 20 cents,
with Detroit area customers
receiving smaller increases
than outstaters-a move by the
commission to equalize rates.
Increases of from one to four
cents per minute were ap-
proved for long distance calls.

IEXPE tINT AL l
PROJECT OUTREACH
MAY 6-7:30 p.m.
ANGELL, AUD. A
27 Community Settings
PSych. 201

USHERS NEEDED
FOR
ALL PERFORMANCES
MAY 11 - 16
Sian-up in Professional Theatre Program Office, Michigan
Leaoue, Mon.-Fri., 8:00-5:00. For further information,
Call 764-0452.
U-M STUDENTS
The University's Enrichment Program offers
you the opportunity . to take courses during
Spring Term in the Practical and Vocational
Arts at the Washtenaw Community College
Campus. This Spring's course selec.tion includes
Auto Services, Welding, Typing, Black Art,
Carpentry, Cabin Construction, etc.
The cost is $12.50 per credit hour with the
registration fee waived for U-M students.
Sign up for classes at WCC.
For more course information
CALL WCC AT 971-6300

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