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May 15, 1976 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-05-15

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Page Ten

THE MCHIGAN DAI.Y

CG'c& k1!ori, £enoice4

Saturday, May 15, 1976
Reagan h #it iry tral

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
State at Huron and Washington
Worship Services:
9:30 a.m.-Communion Service
-Chapel.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Warship
Service-Sanctuary.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.- Church
School.
U.M.Y.F. Contemporary Serv-
ice 'Lightshine-"
Worship Services are broad-
cast over WNRS-AM (1290) each
Sunday from 11:00-12:00 noon.
BETHLEHEM UNITED
ChURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave. Ph. 665-6149
Minister: Orval L. E. Wiimann
9:00 a.m.-Chapel Service.
10:00 am.-Worship Service.
10:00 am.-Church School.
Child care at 10:00 a.m. serv-
ice,
Service broadcast on WNRS.
UNIVERSITY REFORMED
CHURCH, 1001 E. Huron
Calvin Malefyt, Alan Rice,
Ministers
9:30 am.-Church School.
10:30 am.-Morning Worship.
UNIVERSITY LUTIHERAN
CHAPEl. (LCMS)
1511 Washtenaw Ave. 663-5560
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday morning workship at
9:30.
Sunday Bible study at 10:45.

LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH (ALC-LCA)
(Fermerly Lutheran Student
Chapel)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest Ave. at Hill St.
Sunday Service at 10:30 a.m.
** *
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF CHRIST
Presently Meeting at
YM-YWCA, 530 S. Fifth
David Graf, Minister
Students Welcome.
For information or transpor-
tion: 663-3233 or 662-2494.
10:00 a.m.-Sunday Worship.
CAMPUS CHAPEL-a place
for people
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
Pastor: Dn Postema
10:15 a.m.-Morning Worship
--Call to Celebration."
6:00 p.m.-Evening Service.
ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekend Masses:
Saturday -S p.m., 11:30 p.m.
Sunday -- 7:45 a.m., 9 a.m.,
10:30 a.m., noon, and 5 p.m.
(plus 9:30 a.m. North Campus).
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw
Sunday Service and Sunday
School-10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Testimony Meet-
ing-8:00 p.m.
Child Care-Sunday, under 2
years.
Midweek Informal Worship.
Reading Room - 306 E. Lib-
erty, 10-6 Monday and Friday;
10-5 all other days; closed Sun-
days.

ANN ARBOR CHURCH
OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadiff Blvd.
(ore black west of
U of M Stadium)
Bible Study - Sunday, 9:30
am.-Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.
Worship--Sunday, 10:30 am.
and 6:90 p.m.
Need Transportation? C a l I
662-9926.
UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
40 S. Division
M. Robert Fraser, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship-41:00 a.m.
Evening Worship-7:00 p.m.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
(Episcopal)
218 N. Division-663-0606
Sundays at noon-Holy Eucha-
rist with a meal following.
Guest-in-Residence - Rev. Dr.
Jeannette Piccard.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH'
1432 Washtenaw-662-466
Worship - Sunday, 9:30 and
11:00 a.m.
Young Adult meals-Sunday,
12:30 p.m. Wednesday, 6:00 p.m.
($1.00).
Study and discussion-
11:00 a.m. S u n d a y: Adult
study.
12:00-1:00 Thursday: Thursday
Forum (lunch, $1.25),
Chancel C h o i r - 7:00-8:30
Thursday.
For more information about
the Young Adult Program call
Jo Ann Staebler at the church,
662-4466.
o -
a -
U/)
C .
o
0
V"3

(Continued trom Page 1
Today the automobile and
the men and women who make
it .are under constant personal
attack from Washington," he
told the motor city audience.
Reagan went on to condemn
the energy bill signed by Presi-
dent Ford last December, claim-
ing that the bill would force
Detroit to build smaller cars
"no matter whether anyone
wants them."
HE BLAMED the Federal En-
ergy Administration (F E Ay

bureaucracy for the rise in gaso-
line prices, and called for the
abolishment of that agency.
He also criticized the welfare
system, stating that "able-bodied
welfare recipients should work
on community projects in return
for their welfare payments."
Reagan told his audience that
the American people are "hun-
gry for a spiritual revival," and
said that he hoped his election
would put "God back in' the
classroom."

Campaign '76

{Continued from Pages)S
Jerry Ford is already Presi-
dent. His toothpaste is already
in the john at the White House,
but incumbency doesn't mean
as much this year as it has in
others. Nobody ever cast their
lot with Ford outside Grand
Rapids except Richard Nixon
before New Hampshire, and he's
had to sweat out primary nights
with the least promising of the
Democrats.
When you have GOP backing,
as GOP presidents usually do,
you hit a lot of big fund-raising
dinners where wealthy Repub-
licans listen to you talk about
prosperity. They eat it up right
with the mass-banquet fried
chicken and fruit cocktail, and
cheer madly for four more years
of the same. But at such a fund-
raiser at Cobo Hall in Detroit
last October, when the political
oven was just starting to really
heat up, Ford could hardly mus-
ter a squeal. The conspicuous
presence of heavyweight Mich-
igan Republicans like Robert
Griffin, William Milliken, and
Marvin Esch - typical symbols
of support for an incumbent -
just couldn't turn the trick. Ford
couldn't campaign like an in-
cumbent because nobody saw
him as one, so he went up to
New Hampshire and started act-
ing like he wasn't one.
RONALD REAGAN started
throwing snowballs at photog-
raphers-a terrific "photo op-
portunity," as if Reagan didn't
know it-long before the Presi-
dent arrived, and the former
movie actor had the jump on
him. Reagan is smooth as silk
on glass with whatever group
wants to l i s t en, and in New
Hampshire there were plenty
who did.
With campaign staffers at his
Manchester headquarters he
was all Hollywood, a humble
smile gracing the handsome fea-
tures which looked fifteen years
youngers than the sixty-five
they really were. He only had
to be courteous, calm, and
grateful with these people. They
were already in the bag. But at
an elementary school gymnas-
ium rally in the conservative
farming town of Candia, he was
out to persuade, and he let

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C A
JOSE CUFFRV0*TE-QUH.A RU PROOF.
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loose with all the home-spun
charm and Cold War talk he
could summon up - a curious
mixture.
After Nancy, a born politician,
selected a carnation from the
bouquet presented by the 11-
year-old Homecoming queen and
pinned it on her husband's lapel,
he introduced his buddy from
Hollywood, actor Lloyd Nolan,
with the statement, "Lloyd and
I go back to the days when the
Communists were trying to take
over our industry and we fought
the good fight together." The
line scored in Candia, but Rea-
gan wouldn't have dared use it
an hour before at a college rally
in Manchester. On the campaign
trail, one gets accustomed to a
few surprises.
AFTER SOME kid pointed a
toy gun at him just six hours
after he said he wanted to be
President in November, Reagan
and his wife were particularly
paranoid, understandably, in the
crashing crowds of the cam-
naign. The night of the New
Hamoshire primary, when Rea-
gan left for his quarters think-
ing he had won, he and his wife
made their reluctant way
through the crowd with smiles
frozen on their glazed features.
The Secret Servicemen, out of
their minds with tension and
fear, packed around the candi-
date and shouted at a Daily re-
porter and others to "Get your
hands- out of your pockets!
C'mon, c'mon, o u t of the
pockets;" Reagan made it to
his room but he didn't win the
primary. Which one did he
think was more important?
Perhaps the m o s t tireless
handshaker and how-ya-doiner of
them all is a man who admits
at once shaking the hand of a
department store mannequin -
Jimmy Carter. Yes, the smile is
stunning, but his way with the
crowd is not particularly warn.
The glaring grin is absolutely
constant. Reagan's, at least,
shifts in intensity.
The man on Carter's heels in
Michigan is Morris Udall, who
stands half a head above every-
body else in a mass of support-
ers-a situation not particularly
popular with the Secret Service.
You can spot Mo in a crowd
from a quarter-mile away.
Presidents have to be liked by
everybody, and no candidate
misses the chance to be caught
on film being liked. Even Udall,
a man who claims to have made
his campaign on the issues
alone, is loathe to let the oppor-
tunity pass. When he was in Ann
Arbor a week ago he played a
little two-on-two basketball with
Wolverines Rickey Green, Way-
man Britt, and John Robinson:
when the game was over and
the three began to drift away
from the candidate's side, Udall
shot out a pair of long arms and
insisted, "Hey, let's get a pic-
ture, let's get a picture!" and
grabbed the three around the
shoulders and grinned.
The cameras flashed. Count
the number of flashes for each
candidate, and in January,
watch the one with fhe most.

SUMMER BEIT MIDRASH
BASIC JUDAISM: Mon. & Tues. 7:00-8:30
JEWISH LITERATURE THROUGH THE AGES:
Mon. 8:30-10:00
ANCIENT JEWISH HISTORY: (time to be
arranged, cail the office)
MODERN JEWISH THOUGHT: Thurs. 7:00-8:00
READINGS IN THE BIBLE: Thurs. 6:00-9:00
Classes begin Monday, May 17
Register at First Class Meeting or
call HILLEL, 663-3336
B'noi Brith Hillel Foundation, 1429 Hill St,

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