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May 05, 1976 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-05-05

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, May S, 976

Pr.^"ae Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday..,t5 May 5, 1976 f ..

THE PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM presents
RODDY McDO WALL VINCENT P RICE
CORAL BROWNE IN
MAY 11-16 in POWER CENTER
Tickets at PTP Ticket Office, Mendelssohn Theatre
Tickets at PTP Ticket Office,
Mende's ohn Theatre Lobby

Arts & Entertainment

FRI.-SAT.
ED
TRICKET
guitar, hammered dul

$2.50 '
T
cimer

Aaron Copland,
America's most-
honored composer,
conducted the
Friday night concert
of the May Festival
at Hill Aud., April 30.

Best known among other musicians for his im-
peccable back-up instrumentals, harmonies, and
arrangements, and as the leader of the Golden
Ring, Ed is also an incredibly warm performer
with a beautiful repertoire.
1421 HILL 8:00 761-1451

Dly Photo by STEVE KAGAN
Gom Copland, May Festival

I

NO COVER APRIL 27 28 MISl 2q 30 -
,SUNr, ON.JUE. ihTM R
q ' 0o at II Mie 2i 13 14 I
r ,il f 0 ; c.2
23 24 Z " 2 N~tZ
EVI FRE
yE I3e-'1i3OKEVIN LYl ts HIWE5T8ZN SwiNG FRIV 05Sf!1

wVwC u IOns 11111

(Editorial note: The May Fes-
tival, running from April 28th
through May 1st at Hill Audi-
torium, was covered by Daily
staff reviewers Jeffrey Selbst
and Nancy Coons. Coons attend-
ed the first two concerts, Selbst
the third. Here are their reports.)
BENEFIT CONCERT
-FEATURING-
MARTIN BELL
Guitarist and Composer
and Vocalist
Thursday-8 p.m.
TICKETS $2 00
ST. CLARE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2309 PACKARD ROAD

By JEFFREY SELBST
There is something ruggedly
American about Aaron Cop-
land, something that makes
you feel all virtuous and Bicen-
tennial when you listen to his
music. The spare sonorities of
Fanfare for the Common Man
hardly suggest the Habsburgs;
Appalachian Spring conjures
up pictures of meadows, but
not Alpine ones.
So it is only fitting that a
great deal of Aaron Copland be
played in a concert celebrat-
ing, among other things, the
impending Bicentennial. But
the May Festival, and its organ-
izers thereof, went one step
further. They brought the sev-
enty-five-year old Aaron Cop-
land himself in to conduct the
Friday performance, with the
Philadelphia Orchestra. And
what an occasion it was!
The program was rigorously
American, and decidedly seri-
attn. When programmers go
American, they generally go
Gershwin and such light stuff.
But this program consisted of
C o p 1 a n d 's aforemention-
ed Fanfare, his Clarinet Con-
certo, and the spite from his op-
era The Tender Land (backed
up by the University Festival

Chorus), as well as Samuel
B a r b e r' s School for Scan-
dal Overture, William Schu-
man's New England Triptych
(after Billings), and Charles
Ives' Decoration Day from
Symphony: Holidays.
There was an overwhelming
applause from the audience
when Copland stepped up to
open the concert, and this fol-
lows the prevailing rules of the
unwritten concert etiquette:
when an aging grandmaster of
the musical arts steps up, clap
-itl your hands wear out. The
nation becomes simple -
even a mediocre performance
by such as Copland deserves
earthshaking accolades.
This is not to say that the
performance wasn't simply
stunning, but audience reaction
was predictable; they would
have loved anything he did.
The standing ovation at the end
isas tie rigesir.
le opened with his own Fan-
fare, and played it with less
definition but more vitality
than I am accustomed to hear-
ing it. It is a hollow brass work,
aith stentorian sonority to give
it ciilor. But iiften its very
See COPIAND, Page 7

TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY
"ALL YOU CAN EAT"'
ENGLISH STYLE FISH 'N CHIPS
includes unlimited trips to our famous salad bar and hot
loaves of our home baked bread.
ADULTS.. . . . . $3.44
CHILDREN .. $1.95
(under 12)
Served Tuesday and Wednesday 5 p.m.-11 p.m.
iestBank
at the Holiday Inn West.
esty 2900 JACKSON RD.
665-4444

TONIGHT - 7 P.M.
DAVID LEAN'S 1959
Great Expectations
A spectacular film, and an excellent adaptation of the Dick-
ens classic. The actina is superb, the cinematoaraphv breath-
taking. A vouna ruffian, Pip, inadvertently becomes heir to a
lrae fortune and must learn to live oracefully among the
upper classes, while trying to discover the identity of his
benefactor and win over the true love of his childhood. John
Mills, Jean Simmons, Alec Guiness.
9 P.M
ORSON WELLES' 1943
The Magnificent Ambersons
Orson Welles' vivid imagination turns Booth Tarkinoton's
novel into a classic cinematic invention, a story of the de-
clining maonificence of the American dynasty, where the in-
dividual was forced to change to meet the new socio-
economic world head-on. A more mature'and technically
lyric film than CITIZEN KANE, Joseph Cotten, Aqnes
Moorehead.

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