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May 15, 1975 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-05-15

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Thursday, Jv1ay 15, 1975

THF- MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five I

Thursday, May 15, 1975 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Five

Th
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$42,0
from
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Ulrich's finds University big buyer Philadelphia M.D.'s
By TIM SCHICK various departments. The ex- Judy Reese, Co-ordinating Li-
penses are mainly lump sum brarian at the University Hou-hon W ork slow dow n
he University has purchased purchasing orders taken out in ing Office explained that "each
17.10 of unspecified books advance to cover expected ex- store has a specialized strength P H I L A D E L P H I A gery case.
local bookstores, with a penses over a period of time. which we try to draw on." UPI - Several Philadelphia THE SPOKESMAN -a s d
Toportionate amount being Seaddta hnbyn rahsiaseprecdwr
t from Ulrich's and Cen- According to Eugene Ingram, She added that when buying area hospitals experienced work "any surger y, any needed medi-
e, according to a Univer- director of purchasing, it is up books for the dorms several slowdowns yesterday as phy- cal aid will be given."
rep cordtoithen BoardgofRe- to the individual department things are taken into account, sicians began taking part in a
rlast month. Bnot the purchasing department, including service, discount and nationwide protest over the in- Dr. John Lane, president of
s last month.to decide what store will b speed with which a book can be creased cost of malpractice in- the Lower Bucks County Hos-
he report shows that Ulrich's ,useda nd to neotiate a discount obtained. surance. pital medical staff, said pa-

has received $11,114.20 in pur-
chase orders, Centicore $8,274.
94, while other city stores re-
ceived no more than $3,000
apiece in business,
THE REASON for the large
amount of University business
with Ulrich's is apparently a
better discount arrangement.
The expenses incurred be-
tween January 20 and March
31 of this year were made by
Art Fair hc
endure tedi
(Continued from Page 3)
ming his guitar.
REACTING TO the registra-
tion set-up "number 93" said,
"Everybody's cool and nobody
is out to rip anyone off for their
place in line."
According to veterans of past
Ann Arbor Art Fairs, the Union
used to be open to them until
1:00 a.m. and again at 6:00 a.m.
However; this year the Union
has been closed to waiting
craftsmen entirely. "Every-
body's taking it pretty good
. . . we're all going to get wet
together" said Larry Lerfald
who flew in from Fort Lauder-
dale, Fla., to secure a position
for July.
"I paint a lot and sketch,"
said 13-year-old Beth Patton
who traveled only as far as
her Ann Arbor home to partici-
pate in the registration. Asked

from them.
ULRICH'S offers a 10 per
cent discount on all University
purchases. Folletts doesn't give
any discount to the University,
a policy which the University
Cellar follows also. However
the Cellar does have a general
five per cent discount on books
and a 15 per cent discount on
general supplies. In addition
they cut prices on large orders.
)pefuls
sous wait
when she would exhibit her art-
work along with her mother's
pottery she remarked, "About
another hundred years .
when the world is ready for
junk."
BEVERLY Coffin, however,
would encourage the young ar-
tist to participate in the Fair
for she is the advocate of "free"
exhibition in the real sense of
the word.
Although the Free Fair was
originally set up as an alterna-
tive to the juried Street Fair
which is located on South Uni-
versity, the former is now
structured and restricted tonlim-
it the number of artists show-
ing their work
"What's wrong with an ar-
tist setting up his wares on a
street corner? It's for their
benefit," Coffin said. "There
shouldn't be so much friction
for the artists," the multi-
crafts-women added.

"IF A DORM is holding a
class, we can't wait for the
store to order the books, so we
try to find one that has them in
stock," Reese said.
She said that her office usual-
ly ends up patronizing local
stores equally, though they have
the best luck with Centicore
and Borders.
Officials at Ulrich's and Cen-
ticore had no comment about
the nature of the relationship
with the University.
Managers at stores receiving
less business from the Univer-
sity said they were interested
in the report. However, they
were unable to explain why they
had been passed by.

A spokesman at Lower Bucks
County Hospital in nearby Bris-
tol said physicians were not
performing any routine work,
but did handle one minor sur-

tients already admitted would
be cared for and emergency
treatment would be performed.
"We don't want anybody
harmed," he said.

SEMINAR on the
"Use of Tissue Cuture in the Study
of Neuronal and Glial Metabolism"
by LEIF HERTZ, M.D.,
Dept. of Anatomy at the
University of Saskatchewan, in
Saskatoon, Canada
SEMINAR: 3:45 p.m., 1057 MHRI
TEA: 3:15 p.m., 2059 MHRI

FEDERICO FELLINIS
ILA STUADA
Starring Anthony Quinn, Richard Basehart, and Giuliet-
to Msina (Fellini's wife). A most moving and poetic
picture, one of Fellini's best. A sideshow strongman and
his innocent slavey tour neorealistic post-war Italy. Ital-
ian with English subtitles.
TONIGHT at Friday:
7 & 9 p.m. 1.25 Woody Allen
Aud. A, Angell Hall Double Feature

new world productions presents ..-
DAMON in :

WEIGHT CONTROL
Through Behavior Modification
Due to its striking success nationally and
locally, BEHAVIOR S C I E N C E SERVICES'
Weight Control Program is continuing into its
second year in the Ann Arbor area.
The WEIGHT CONTROL PROGRAM is the NON-DIET
approach to weight control frequently described in national
women's magazines. It is the approach to overeating that
achieves permanent control because it replaces stress-
causing diets with Behavior Change. This means that each
program member is trained in the analysis of their eating
habits-the "how and why" of their eating-and through
behavioral osvchology learns to alter the pattern. It be-
comes easy and natural to maintain a chosen we.ight level
because one learns to respond to food the way a normal
weight person does.
TENSION-ANXIETY
CONTROL WORKSHOP
Workshops designed to teach self-control of anxiety and
tension such as associated with "nervousness," musicle
cramps, excess smeokina and eatina, insomnia, tension
headaches, fears phobias and social uneasiness. Utiliza-
tion. of Proressiye Relocation Trainina. electronic biofeed-
back, 'Eastern" disciplines, and behavior change strategies
SMOKING ELIMINATION,
A orogram utilizing behavior modification (as opposed to
druas, psychotherapy, or "willpower") to eliminate smok-
in.
BEHAVIOR SCIENCE SERVICES is an organization of aca-
demically credentialed professionals f r om Psychology,
Social Work and other disciplines. Our methods are not
made available to the public until they have been tested
through years of laboratory and clinical research. We also
maintain a fee-adiustment system. For information write
or call: Behavior Science Services, 524 Packard, Ann Arbor,
48104. Phone: 994-0019

"amion's. Chamber of Horror"
LIVE MIDNIGHT HORROR
ON STAGE see a womon's head chopped off in the guillotine someone ripped
in half by a GIANT saw-watch a girl being burned alive-a body shred-
ded to pieces by a rack of spikes.
ALL THIS AND MORE ON STAGE AT MIDNIGHT
stage followed by classic horror film "SCREAM and SCREAM AGAIN!"
FOX VILLAGE THEATRE
FRIDAY & SATURDAY, MAY 16 & 17
ALL SEATS $2.00 MIDNIGHT SHOWS ONLY

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