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August 19, 1975 - Image 22

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-08-19

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Poge Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, August 19, 1975

Page Ten THE MiCHIGAN DAILY Tuesday August 19, 1 97~

British rock fans prefer 'the
hottest new band' to oldies

Ford praises
farmers' work

By MARY CAMPBELL
AP Newsteatures Writer
In England, s a y s Russell
Mael of Sparks, rock audiences
are primarily interested in the
hottest new band. "It's shock-
ing to us to see that here in
American people are concerned
with the groups they grew up
with-the Beatles and the Roll-
ing Stones. The point of refer-
ence is still the Beatles. In Eng-
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land, we're the point of refer-
ence.
"It makes it exciting in Eng-
land. You've got to keep on
your toes. They want something
fresh and new."
MAEL SAYS that among the
reasons is that in England peo-
ple get a job, start a family and
give up rock music at an ear-
lier age than in America. There-
fore, the bulk of the audience
is younger; they grew up since
the Beatles.
He says it was good for
Sparks; since English audiences
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are interested in the new, they
listen to new groups. Sparks has
had four top 10 singles and two
top 10 LPs in England.
But Russell Mael, 21, lead
singer in Sparks, and his broth-
er, Ron Mael, 26, who writes
most of the quintet's songs,
aren't English. They grew up
near Los Angeles, moving to
London two and a half years
ago.
IN COLLEGE they started a
group, Halfnelson, which made
a record for Bearsville in 1971.
It went nowhere. Russell says,
"We thought of a boring name,
Sparks, and put a boring photo
of us on the front of the second
album, 'A Woofer is Tweeter's
Clothing,' and proved it wasn't
in the name. Nothing happened
with that record either."
Jack Nicklaus and Johnny
Miller both earned more than
$150,000 in the first four months
of the 1975 PGA golf tour.
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(Continued from Pare 3)
needs and the needs of our tra-
ditional customers, who have
consistently b o u g h t from us
through the years," ,the Presi-
dent said.
EXPRESSING concern over
recent Iowa crop losses due to
dry weather, Ford said he nev-
ertheless expects record grain
crops.
He said the Russians have
purchased 9.8 million tons of
grain in recent weeks and "we
anticipate further purchases."
Ford pointed out that while
the U.S. awaits final crop re-
ports, the government is asking
American exporters to tempo-
rarily delay further sales to
Russians. So far White House
aides said the Soviets have
bought 4.2 million tons of wheat
and 5.6 million tons of other
grain
THE PRESIDENT said Amer-
ican farm production and food
exports "are a dynasaic contri-
bution to a stable and orderly
world." Last year's $22 billion
in farm exports had given the
U.S. a "green harvest" of $12
billion in favorable foreign ex-
change, Ford noted.
"Our agricultural abidance
helped open the door to ""A mil-
lion people on the mai,. ad of
China," Ford added. "It helped
improve relations with the So-
viets. It helped build bridges to
a developing world."
Maritime unions, meanwhile,
refused to load grain newly
purchased by the Soviet Union.
THE PRESIDENT alluded to
recent charges by foreign buy-
ers that some American grain
shipments have been under-
weight and not of the quality
specified by shippers.
He promised to "move vigor-
ously to clear up this problem"
and "demonstrate to the world
the validity of America's repu-
tation as an honest and depend-
able supplier of high quality
farm products."
Ford flew to Des Moines
from Colorado, where he inter-
rupted a two-week vacation to
make a fast-paced two-day
swing into four states.
HE SCHEDULED visits to six

cities, where he was to make
seven speeches and do some
politicking at meetings with
Republican leaders in Iowa and
Minnesota.
Because of the political over-
tones of the trip, the Republi-
can National Committee is pay-
ing the $2,206-an-hour cost of
the presidential jet and all costs
of the trip, except for the first
stop at Rifle, Colo.
Ford went to that small Wes-
tern Colorado town to tour the
$8-5 million privately financed
Paraho oil shale operation to
emphasize alternative sources
of energy that can help the U.
S. gain independence from for-
eign imports.
IN A two-hour tour, the Presi-
dent walked into the mine to
see actual shale digging and is
inspect a refinery where oil is
cooked outrofithe rock under 90
degree heat and high pressure.
He told reporters at the shale
development site, where 17
companies are working together
in hopes of unlocking one of the
largest potential energy sources
in the world, that "If there are
same breakthroghs .. .thsis
would become a bigger portion
of our over-all program."
Ford flew to Rifle via heli-
copter from his vacation home
at Vail, Colo., then took a bum-
py, 20-minute ride over a wind-
ing mountain road to get to the
tunnel. On the way, he remark-
ed, "It scares me to death driv-
ing up this road."
THE PRESIDENT then doi-
ned a hard hat, safety glasses
and an emergency air supply
for the 1,200 - foot walk into
the mountain - all by way at
underscoring the admini stra-
tion's view that shale rock may
harbor an energy bonanza that
could reduce America's depen-
dence upon oil imports.
The experimental station
now mines about 500 tons of
shale per day, from which 200
barrels of oil is extracted. The
mine is on Navy property atnd
the oil is used by that service.
Paraho director Harry Pforz-
heimer told the President that
"With shale oil, we think we
could be competitive at the
current world crude oil price,"
which is $12 per barrel.

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