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August 15, 1975 - Image 10

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-08-15

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, August 15, 1975

Sinai agreement believed to be near

By The Associated PresS
Israel and Egypt have agreed
on all but some minor points of
an interim Sinai settlement and
Secretary of State Henry Kis-
singer is "almost certain" to
arrive in Israel by the- middle
of n e x t w e e k, diplomatic
sources in Jerusalem said yes-
terday.
Israeli Prime Minister Yitz-
hak Rabin is expected to inform
Austrian Chancellor Bruno Krei-
sky that he will not be able to
visit Vienna next week as pre-
viously scheduled, the Israeli
state radio said.

SOURCES in Jerusalem said
the issue that will probably keep
Kissinger busiest during his
shuttle would be who will run
the radar stations in the stra-
tegic Mitla and Gidi passes.
They said while Egypt had
not accepted all of Israel's de-
mands to station Israeli soldiers
and American technicians at the
e a r l y warning stations, the
problem was not considered in-
surmountable.
Other well p l a c e d Israeli
sources in Tel Aviv said that a
Kissinger shuttle probably would
not last more than 10 days. If

he did come next week, that
would m e a n an agreement
would be signed by Sept. 1, if
one were signed at all.
THE SOURCES said that
most of the major points of the
agreement such as the Israeli
withdrawal to the eastern end
of the passes, plus control of a
strategic road to southern Sinai
east of the proposed Egyptian
land corridor leading to the Abu
Rudeis oilfield, had been settled.
The Israelis received the lat-
est Egyptian views Wednesday,
and one source said "our cau-
tious optimism is maintained
after an analysis of the last 24
hours."
Rep. Morris Udall (D-Ariz.)
told a news conference in Tel
Aviv that in his opinion "we
have about reached that 90 per
cent point" for the chances of
success in the negotiations.
KISSINGER has said he would

return to the Middle East when
he was 90 per cent sure of con-
cluding the accord.
Meanwhile, in a speech to a
Southern farm group in Birm-
ingham, Ala. yesterday, Kis-
singer inlicated that any Soviet
interference in the domestic af-
fairs of Portugal runs against
the principles of European se-
curity and the over-all policy of
detente.
Kissinger also nade a strong
plea for popular support of his
foreign policy. "Without unity
and common purpose,' he said,
"we harm not only the country's
fortunes today but the hopes of
future generations."
IN SEEKING to ease fears
that recent moves toward bet-
ter relations with Moscow will
w e a k e n America, Kissinger
said, "The United States has
never accepted that the Soviet
Union is free to relax tensions

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Troubled cities quiet last

By The Associated Press
Specially trained police teams
searched for snipers yesterday
in a Mexican - American area
of Riverside, Calif., after six
persons were wounded and a
police helicopter was forced

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33

down by gunfire the night be-
fore.
Meanwhile in Boston,. five
persons were injured yesterday
and police sealed off streets
near a housing project in the
predominantly black Roxbury
neighborhood. Authorities said
the violence was scattered and
less than in four previous
nights.
CALM prevailed in Elyria,
Ohio, after several nights of
rock and bottlethrowing, and
in Hartford, Conn., where a
crowd in an Hispanic area
threw debris and rocks at po-
lice Wednesday.
There were ns new outbreaks
of violence yesterday in the
Casa Blanca area of Riverside,
70 miles east of Los Angeles.
On Wednesday night, two offic-
ers were among six persons
wounded by gunfire, and auto-
matic weapons fire disabled a
police copter and a light plane,
police said.
Special weapons and tactics
SWAT teams from San Bernar-
dino and San Diego joined local
officers in an unsuccessful hunt
for four snipers who drove po-
lice from the Mexican - Ameri-
can neighborhood before dawn
yesterday.
OFFICERS searched a corn-
field and the yards of six near-

selectively or as a cover for the
pursuit of unilateral advant-
age."
Pointing the near-civil war in
Portugal between Social Demo-
crats and Communists, he said:
"The Soviet Union should not
assume that it has the option,
either directly or indirectly, to
influence events contrary to the
right of the Portuguese people
to determine their own future,
Without making any direct
threat, Kissinger nevertheless
said pointedly that "the involve-
ment of external powers for this
purpose . . . is inconsistent with
any principle of European se-
curity."
This was a reference to an
agreement signed by the Soviet
Union, the United States and 33
other governments earlier this
month in Finland establishing
principles of European security
and cooperation.
night
by houses, where police at
first believed up to 50 persons
were hiding.
In Boston, two white fire-
fighters were stoned yesterday
when they answered a false
alarm in the mostly black Rox-
bury area and one black was
assaulted by a gang of whites
in South Boston, an Irish neigh-
borhood.
Two other whites were also
stoned. All were treated and re-
leased. Boston police closed
three streets around a housing
project in Roxbury because of
isolated incidents of stoning
ON WEDNESDAY night, 29
tpersos, including eight potice
men, were injured.
A total of 36 persons ho\
been injured and 83 arrested
for assault and disorderlint-,
since Monday, police said.
Most stoning in Boston on
Wednesday was near housing
projects in Roxbury, but a black
and a white were hit by rocks
in South Boston.
IN ELYRIA, black leaders
and city officials met to seek
an end to the violence and van-
dalism that flared in the city
of 53,000 Tuesday and Wednes-
day nights, injuring 24 persons.
T h i r t e e n fires were
set Wednesday and 40 persons
were arrested,

NOTICE OF REFUND
HEARINGS
If you were a University of Michi-
gan student during any term from
May 1, 1972 through June 30,
1973 and paid non-resident tuition
but believed yourself a resident of
Michigan at the time, you may be
entitled to a tuition refund under
Hays v Regents, 393 Mich 756
(1974). The deadline to apply for
a refund hearing is Sept. 1, 1975.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION WRITE:
Woshtenaw County Clerk
County Building
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48108

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