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August 09, 1975 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-08-09

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Saturday, August 9, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Po(

Saturday, August 9, 1975 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Pa ge Five

ige Five

Mayor plans Services unit Contemporary musician dead

(Oontirued from Page 1)
department, but would rather be
used for "outreach activities"
only.
Wheeler defended setting up
the unique department-one of
his campaign promises-by say-
ing, "Why wait for legislation
to tell us to provide these other
kinds of (h u m a n) services?
Let's set the initiative."
He explained that the program
would "meet the real needs that
haven't been met" like housing
and health needs and will in-
clude a Public Information
Service.
THE INFORMATION service,
Wheeler stated, "is a way of
beginning to see how govern-
ment serves the people." The
service would. detail how to get
benefits from government pro-
grams aiding senior citizens, the
handicapped and veterans.
One way of deseminating this
information, Wheeler suggested,
was through public service an-
nouncements on cable television.
He emphasized that while the
H u m a n Services Department
would "serve everybody, we
can't lose sight of the fact that
the needs of some people are
greater than others. These peo-
ple have a higher priority."
WHEELER ALSO used the
occasion to lash into the CDRS
application approved by a for-
mer Republican-dominated City
Council under the guidance of
ex-mayor Jim Stephenson.
"There are things with this
current proposal that I am not
happy with and half the (pres-
ent) Council is not happy with."
HUD's revenue sharing funds
include some $12 million tenta-
tively granted to the city over
a six year period. A proposal to
spend the funds is required to
be submitted to HUD for annual
review.

THE MAYOR asserted that
money slated for certain pro-
grams, which are contained in
the present CDRS budget, do
not have to be spent this year.
The funds would thest be added
to next year's grant in an un-
specified manner.
"I can think of $250,000 (allot-
ed) for street repair" that could
be spent elsewhere, Wheeler de-
clared.
The proposed use of the street
repair money caused heated de-
bate in Council chambers last
spring, when s o m e Council
members argued that street re-
surfacing was not keeping in
the spirit of CDRS-that of aid-
ing low and moderate income
families.
WHEELER promised that in
the future "there will be a more
coordinated local effort which
would more closely meet the
guidelines of CDRS."
Referring to the current CDRS
packet, Wheeler stated, "We
didn't see programs around
identified needs," there was no
long-term plan.
"We will provide the CDRS
committee with more definitive
types of goals," he stated. The
CDRS citizens' committee was
set up by Stephenson to recom-
mend a budget for spending the
federal grant.
However, the committee suf-
fered charges of "rubber-stamp-
ing" GOP programs and failing
to carry out the intention of
CDRS. F o r m e r Republican
Councilman William Colburn
was appointed by Stephenson to
chair the committee.
Wheeler said that the citizens'
committee's charter, which ex-
pires in October, "can be flush-
ed out and some things done to
it. . . . I'm trying to" change
the structure of the committee,
"that's obvious."

(Continued from Page 3)
Parker's on fast tempo. Carter's
influence, at least tonally, ap-
peared in Adderley's slow bal-
lads.
He had studied brass and
reed instruments in a Talla-
hassee high school from '1944
until 1948, forming his first jazz
group there with the school's
band director as adviser. Fellow
students dubbed him "Canni-
bal" because of his hearty ap-
petite, and that name later
emerged as Cannonball.
HE BECAME music director
at Dillard High School in Fort
Lauderdale, Fla., from 1958 until
1956, playing in his own south-
ern Florida jazz group between
1948 and 1950. He served a
three-year stint in the Army and
led the 36th Army dance band,
later studying at the Naval
School of Music in Washington,
D.C.
His first big break came in
New York when he appeared
with Oscar Pettiford in 1955. He
signed his first recording con-
tract the next year with Em-
Arcy records, later recording
for Capitol and others, turning
out such albums as "Black
Messiah," "Country Preacher,"
"Fiddler on the Roof," "Walk
Tall" and "Quest Nights." His
last album was "Phenix" on the
Fantasy label.
Charles Suber, publisher of
Dr. Paul C. Uslan
OPTOMETRIST
Full Contact Lens Service
Visual Examinations
548 CHURCH ST.
663-2476

the Chicago - based magazine show he was very original. Cer-
Down Beat, which named Ad- tainly, he was one of the best
derley New Alto Star of the alto players in recent years."
Year in 1959, called Adderley "a Adderley's last project was
helluva musician." He said to be a Broadway musical,
"musicians were calling my of- "Big Man," based on the le-
fice from all over the country gend of John Henry. The 4-year-
asking his condition. People long effort was completed in
didn't recognize him as being California on Thursday, the
a composer, but his albums night before Adderley died..
It Pays to Advertise
in The Michigan Daily
1214- S. university Saturday - Sunday at
1.3.5.7.9-Open at 6:45
Monday at 7 & 9--open 6:45
MONDAY IS GUEST NIGHT
Theatre Phene 668-6416 You and a quest ONLY $2.50
Cscaot SUN TMES - "O rageos!"
"Meyeroutdes hisef...ItbHiisbemever!"
Chicago READER - "Laugh your heads off!"
"Meyer istetaeet eomedy direr
workig in America todayt"
Chicago DEFENDER - "Groove ont"
"Upfentwaithtesomtbriadelr
Los Angeles TIMES - "Shocking!
"Ahlroscmiain of fast actin

Humphrey Bogart and Katherine Hepburn in 1951
THE AFRICAN QUEEN
BOGART plays a cynical and boozing riverboat captain who escapes
from German troops with HEPBURN; a prim Missionary, down danger-
ridden African riyers. One of JOHN HUSTON'S finest films for its in-
credible color, sound and dialoque and Bogart's only Oscar for Best Actor:
MON.: BLOOD AND SAND starring Rudolph Valentino
(FREE -- SILENT ---at 8:00)

PGY $E 1'00 >
PG OO I EROUERT
ROY SUAW RIAD
Mon -Tues.-Thurs.-Fri, at:
603 east liberty. 7 & 9:15 Only 0Ooen at 6:45
Sat.-Sun.-Wed. at:
1:15-3:45-6:30-9:05 p.m.
Open at 12:45
"The Greatest Western Since
Theot~e ' Ford's 'Stoqecoach' " -- L.A.
Times
BITiTHE
, BIILLTFLI1s

Cinema Guild

TONIGHT AT OLD ARCH AUD.
7:30 & 9:30 Adm. only $1.0

* JACK NICHOLSON WEEKEND .
Bob Rafelson's 1970
5 EASY PIECES
Of all NICHOLSON'S films to date, this is the one that belongs solely to
him. Bobby Dupee, musician and rich boy turned oil-rigger, is alienated,
dissatisfied, intolerant. The western landscape photogrophy is beautiful.
The character is highly contemporary. Nicholson is brilliant. Susan Ans-
Poch, Karen Black, Sally Struthers.

NEXT WEEK-
FRI.t Sidney Lumet's LONG DAY'S JOURNEY INTO NIGHT
SATURDAY: Joseph Mankiewicz's GUYS AND DOLLS
TONITE AT ANGELL HALL
7:30 & 9:30 AUD. A
ADM. $1.25,

F

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