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July 23, 1975 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-07-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday July 23, 1975

Page Six THE MICHiGAN DAILY Wednesday, July 23, 1975

SMORGASBORD
WEDNESDAYS 6-9 p.m.
AND
SATURDAYS 6-9 p.m.
X4.95
1. cold vichysoisse
2. coq auvin
3. potatoes anna
-4. shrimp newburghs
5. boeuf burguingnone
6. rice
7. swedish meat balls
8. vermicelli
9. breaded veal cutlet
10. fresh gadeo green
1. tarragonpeas
12. eggplant parmesan
13. beef oriental
14. veal hearts
15. chicken giblets
16. cheese casserole
17. sliced beef
18. fried chicken
19. barbecued ribs
20. fried cod fish
21. black olives
22. greek olives
23. green olives
24. dill pickles
25. celery
26. Carrots
27. green onions
28. crab apples
29. red peppers
30. radishes
31. corn salad
22. sliced cucumbers
with sour cream
33. sliced tomatoes
with fresh dill
34. red bean salad
35. greek bean salad
36. italian green peppers
37. greek stuffed eggplants
38. sliced beets
39. garlic sauce
40. herring
41. portuguese sardines
42. anchovies
-3. cod fish caviar mousse
44. cod fish red caviar
45. liver pate
.46. sliced jambon
47. sliced salami
48. sliced cold turkey
49. chicken salad
50. russian fish salad
51. tuna fish salad
52. cottage cheese
53. sliced mushrooms in
dill sauce
54. eggols _
55. hot mstard sauce
56. stuffed eggs bonnefemme
57. cole slaw
58. cold salmon
59. fresh tuna in soyu sauce
60. butter
61. home made bread
62. siced tongue
63. horse radish sauce
64. chicken wings Japanese
65. fried squid
66. smoked pok chops
67. potato salad
68. russian salad
69. macaroni salad
70. Jellied fruit salad
71. tossed green salad -
2. chef's dressing
73. french dressing .
74. 1000 island dressing
75. russian dressing
76. tartar sauce
77. hot sauce
78. bacon crumbs
9..croutons
80. parmesan cheese
1. sliced onions
82t.-eggplant salad
83. cocktail sausage
54. h6rs d'eouvres
85. stuffed grapeleaves
86.-greek feta cheese
7. swiss cheese
88. cheddar cheese
89. bread pudding
90. rice pudding ~
9. creme caramel
82. baked apples
3. house ake
94. peaches
95. mandarin oranges
96. orange sliced candies
97. bananas
98. grapes
99rapples
100. watermelon alo

(A'uQI4&v
102 S. First, Ann Arbor
663-2401

CIA officials accused of illegal mail opening

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (P) - 30
present and former officials of
the Central Intelligence Agency
and other government agencies
yesterday were accused in a
class action suit of illegally
opening the mail of Americans.
The suit filed by the American
Civil Liberties Union in U.S.
District Court here alleges that
officials of the CIA, the FBI and
the U.S. Post Office opened the.
first class mail of plaintiff Rod-
ney Driver and other Ameri-
cana.
DRIVER,, a University of
Rhode Island mathematics pro-
fessor, said three letters he sent
to mathematicians in the Soviet
Union were opened and copied.
He said the letters contained
personal and mathematical in-
formation.
Al a news conference, Driver

said he believed the CIA open-
ed his mail because he obtained
copies of the letters from the
CIA when he requested them
under the Freedom of Informa-
tion Act.
The Rockefeller Commission,
which investigated CIA activi-
ties, reported in June that the
agency opened mail to or sent
by American citizens. The mail
project began in New York in
1952, the commission said, in-
volving mail to and from the
Soviet Union.
THE PROGRAM ended in
1973 and the commission report-
ed that during the last full year
of the program the CIA handled
some 4.4 million items, examin-
ed the ,outside of 2.3 million,
photographed the outside of 33,-
000 and opened 8,700.

The suit asks the court to or--
der compensatory damages of.
$20,000 for each letter opened
and read by the CIA and puni-
tive damages of $100,000 for each
person whose mail was apened
by the CIA.
Among those named in the
suit are: former CIA officials
Richard Helms and James Sch-
lesinger; former FBI Director
Patrick Gray; former U.S. Atty.
Gen. John Mitchell, and former
U.S. Post Office officials Law-
rence O'Brien and W i n t o n
Blount.
ALSO named were CIA Di-
rector William Colby and FBI
director Clarence Kelley,. whom
the ACLU said were named in
the suit because they are the
officials presently responsible
for maintaining the information

obtained from the alleged illegal
actions.
ACLU officials charged that
those and other officials knew of
and approved the illegal opening
of mail and that they engaged in
a conspiracy to cover up the
violations.
The ACLU further asks the
court to order records obtained
through the opening of mail to
be destroyed.
Spokesmen for the ACLU said
they were unaware of the exact
number of persons covered by
the class action suit but esii-
mated the number of Americans
whose mail was opened to be in
the tens of thousands.
Manna was the food given to
the Israelites during their 40
yea s of wandering in the wil-
derness.

THIS
AD
WILL
SELF-DESTRUCT
IN
30 SECONDS'
(It Would-If You Heard It on Radio or Saw It on Television)
BUT, PRINTED HERE, IN THE PAGES OF
IT REMAINS TO BE REFERRED TO
AGAIN AND AGAIN ..
A LASTING IMPRESSION
Reach Ann Arbor's University
Market Where You'll Be Read...
AND REMEMBERED!
- InThe
Latest Deadline In The State
764-0554

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