100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 19, 1975 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-07-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Saturday, July 19, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Eleven

Saturday, July 19, 1975 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Eleven

Will Title IX end
sex discrimination.
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Sex discrimination against women in the
nation's schools and colleges will be banned officially Monday
but, according to groups involved in the controversy, the battle
is far from over.
Regulations implementing Title IX of the Omnibus Education
Act of 1972 go into effect. They prohibit discrimination on the
basis of sex in 16,000 school districts, 2,700 institutions of higher
education and educational associations that receive federal aid.
The regulasions apply to a wide variety of educational areas
such as recruitment, hiring, admissions, housing and scholarships.
But the section on athletics brought the most discussion from the
colleges and the women's groups, with some male athletic offic-
ials claiming Title. IX will bring an end to big-time college ath-
letics.
During the past few weeks, there was an unsuccessful
move to reject the regulations in toto and return them to the
Department of Health, Education and Welfare for rewriting.
After that effort failed, opponents of the regulations-includ-
ing the National Collegiate Athletic Association-proposed amend-
ments designed to safeguard revenue-producing sports such as
basketball and football.
Rep. James S. O'Hara, D-Mich., introduced a proposal two
weeks ago and Sen. John Tower, R-Tex., introduced a similar one
last Tuesday. No further action has been taken although hearings
can be expected in the fall.
'We're not going to roll over over and die," said Kay Hutch-
craft, acting director of the Association for Intercollegiate Ath-
letics for women, one of the major proponents of the regulations.
"We will anticipate from the latest action that there will be fur-
ther attempts to make changes in the athletic portions of the new
regulations."
She said the AIAW believes the majority of the institutions
affected will comply with the law.
"We finally have a set of regulations that can go into-ef-
fect, yet we are still concerned about further attempts to
limit those regulations," she said. "It puts our people in a
huge quandry."
An NCAA spokesman said colleges must act as expeditiously
as possible to implement the regulations, although secondary and
postsecondary schools have three years to comply and elementary
schools one year.
"In the area of athletic scholarships, we may see some im-
mediate changes," he said. "We may see a flood of applications
in the fall on the part of women."
He said the NCAA has a possible lawsuit under considera-
tion but that no final decision has been made..
School systems and colleges are not required to spend the
same amount of money on athletic programs for women as they
spend on those for men. But the HEW regulations say that equal
opportunities must be provided for both sexes.
The test the government will use includes whether women
get a fair share of monetary support for their sports programs,
equipment, coaching salaries and scholarships.
The NCAA has taken the position that the Title IX require-
ment, even if it does not require equal spending for women and
men sports programs, will drain the big-time men's football and
basketball programs of a large proportion of their revenues.
I ___

_:..._

chupch WVPJAi epoicei

UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
409 S. Division
M. Robert Fraser, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship-11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship-7:00 p.m.
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CIURCH
State at Huron and Washington
Worship Services
8:30 a.m. in the Chapel.
10:00 a.m. in the Sanctuary.
10:00 a.m.-Church School.
11:00 a.m.--Lemonade-on-the-
lawn. '
Sermon: "The Child In Us" by
Rev. Fred B. Maitland.
Worship service is broadcast
over WNRS-AM (1290) each
Sunday from 11:00 to 12:00
noon.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
CHAPEL (LCMS)
1511 Washtenaw Ave. 663-5560
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday Service at 9:30 a.m.
Bible Study at 10:45 a.m.
ST. ANDREW'S EPSICOPAL
CHURCH, 306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holy Eucharist.
10:00 a.m.-Holy Communion
and Sermon.
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH (ALC-LCA)
(Formerly Lutheran Student
Chapel)
801 S. Forest Ave. at 11111 St.
Gordon Ward, Pastor
Sunday Service at 9:30 a.m.
FIRST CHURCH OF CIRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw
Sunday Service and Sunday
School-10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Testimony Meet-
ing-8:00 p.m.
Child Care-Sunday, under 2
years; Wednesday, through 6
years.
Reading Room - 306 E. Lib-
erty, 10-9 Mon., 10-5 Tues.-Sat.

UNIVERSITY REFORMED
CHURCH, 1001 E. Huron
Calvin Malefyt, Alan Rice,
Ministers
9:30 a.m.--Church School.
5:30 p.m.--Student Supper.
10:30 a.m.-Morning Wors-iip.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
Pastor: Don Postema
10:00 a.m.-Morning Service.
6:00 p.m. - Evening Service.
Dramatic reading of poems by
Christians.
Monday, Wednesday, and Fri-
day at noon. Fellowship Chapel.
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave. Ph. 665-6149
Minister: Orval L. E. Willimann
9:00 a.m-Chapel Service.
10:00 a.m.-Worship Service.
10:00 a.m.-Church School.
Child care at 10:00 a.m. serv-
ice.
Service broadcast on WNRS
(1290 AM).
CANTERBURY HOUSE
218 N. Division-6650606
Sundays at noon: Holy Eucha-
rist with a meal following.
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF CHRIST
Presently Meeting at
YM-YWCA. 530S. Fifth
David Graf, Minister
Students Welcome.
For information or transpor-
tation: 663-3233 or 662-2494.
10:00 a.m. - Sunday Worship
Service.
ANN ARBOR BAHA'I
COMMUNITY
1421 W. Liberty, Ann Arbor
The Baha'is of Ann Arbor are
gathering for a picnic June 8th,
at 1:00 p.m. in Delhi Park, to
celebrate Race Unity Day, and
welcomes the public to pack a
picnic and join in. For further
information call the Baha'i num-
ber, 662-3548.

ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663O557
Weekend Masses:
Saturday- p.m.
Sunday - 7:45 a.m., 9 a.m.,
10:30 a.m., noon, and 5 p.m.
(plus 9:30 a.m. North Campus).
ANN ARBOR CHURCH
OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium Blvd.
(one block west of
U of M Stadium)
Bible Study - Sunday, 9:30
a.m.-Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.
Worship-Sunday, 10:30 a.m.
and 6:40 p.m.
Need Transportation? C a 11
662-9928.
m e~a
Would
you
hi re
you?
Of course you would.
You work hard. And you're good
at it. Like most Americans.
But, if all of us did just a
little better, we'd wind
up with better products, better
services and even more
pride in the work we do.
America. It only works
as well as we do.
T Sk a -a Cm m on ! ..l ,,, D

Put the DAILY
on Your Doorstep!

A STAR IS BORN (at 730)
The 1937 original version of this classic Hollywood success story and
tragedy starring Fredric March, Janet Gaynor and Adolph Menjou.
With a screenplay b} Dorothy Parker.
THE SEA HAWK (at 9:30)
Errol Flynn in one of the action adventure faces he excelled in. An
Elizabethan English Captain lives a gusty, romantic life while fighting
the likes of Claude Rains.
MON.: ERNST LUBITSCH'S GYPSY BLOOD
(at 8--FREE-Silent)
CINEMA GUILD BOTH SHOWS OLD ARCH. AUD.
FOR$1.50
ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S 1935
THE 39 STEPS
Recognized as one of Hitchcock's most brilliant films, it also illustrates
some of his favorite film, jargon. An unsuspecting mar becomes the victim
of instant mystery as he is framed for the murder of an agent involved with
a ring of spies. The film becomes a woolly chase from crowded London to
the spacious moors of Scotland and back Robert Donat.
NEXT WEEK:
FRI.: Eric Rohmer's MY NIGHT AT MAUDS
SAT.: Francois Truffaut's SHOOT THE PIANO PLAYER
TONIGHT AT ANGELL HALL
CINEMA 11 7:30 & 9:30 AUD. A
ADM. $1.25

Why wait until the afternoon to catch up
on what's happening in the world when the
Daily can be at your doorstep in time for
breakfast?
We're prepared to bring you the best in
news and sports - so subscribe now and
don't miss a single issue!
TO GET YOUR SUBSCRIPTION--STOP BY
420 MAYNARD OR CALL 764-0558

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan