100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 17, 1975 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-07-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Ten

THfE MICHIGAN -DAILY

Thursday, July 17, 1975

Apolo, Soyuz ready for docking

(Continued from vage l)
It was the final orbital change
for the Soyuz before the space-
craft rendzvous, but the Ameri-
can astronauts face a series of
maneuvers which will gradually
catch up with the Soviet craft.
THE W I D E L Y separated
spacecraft beamed to earth
simultaneous telecasts showing
their life in orbit.
"We have gotten accustomed
to it," said Lenov, narrating a
television tour of the Soyazt
craft. "Now it is our home."
Lenov and Kubasov also con-
tacted 2 comrades-in-space, the
crew of the Russian space sta-
tion Salyut 4, and relayed news
from home.
The men of Salyut 4 are cos-
monauts Pyotr Klimuk and
Vitaly Sevastyanov. They were
launched May 26 and have lived
aboard the orbitingscience sta-
tion since.
Klimuk catted the Apollo-So-
yuz mission "a very serious
task."
"I THINK that all those who
are in space right now are

aware that this is a grand and
grandiose task," Klimuk said,
then adding a reference to the
American astronauts: "There
are seven people in space right
now."
"'That's, right," . replied Leo-
nov. "These are the magnificent
seven."
In commentary after the tele-
cast, the Soviet mission con-
troller said the cosmonauts were
"very chipper."
SLAYTON used the American
telecast to repay a practical
joke pulled on him in 1961 by
another astronaut. He neld up
a sign which asked in Russian
"Wally Schirra are you a
turtle?"
The question is the recogni-
tion sign of a whimsical organi-
cation of test piolts. Failure to
answer withsthe somewhat.em-
barrassing phrase, "You bet
your sweet ass I am," carries a
penalty of a round of drinks for
everyone within earshot.
Schirra pulled a similar sign
joke on Slayton during the Apol-
lo 7 mission in 1968.
Stafford explained during the

telecast that two broken juice
bags had given the spacecraft
interior a new color ocae.ee.
"IF YOU THINK your TV is
looking through rose colored
glasses from now on it's only
because you are looking thro.gh
strawberry color," said Stafford.
"You'll have a beautiful psy-
chedelic colored spacecraft when
we get back."
The astronauts said they were
able to mop up much of the
free floating juice, but some of
it coated the walls and windows.
The astronauts spent much of
the day working with a series of
experiments and readying ,nqip-
ment for the docking with the
Soyuz.
Both the cosmonauts and as-
tronauts are scheduled to awak-
en in the very early hours this
morning and start the final
moves toward their union in
space.
THE ASTRONAUTS will per-
form four rocket burns to move
within sight of the Soyuz craft.
The spacecraft are expected to
be flying in formation - a move

Mission Control calls "station
keeping"-by 11:51 a.m. (EDT)
today.
At 12:15 p.m. EDT, Stafford
will edge the Apollo craft for-
ward slowly until its docking
latches engage those on the
smaller Soyuz.
At that moment, they will
have accomplished history's
first international space dock-
ing.
It will take about three hours
to prepare and check out the
Docking Module for an exchange
of visits between the spacecraft.
AT ABOUT 3:20 p.m. (EDT)
the final hatch separating the
two craft will be opened and
Stafford and Leonov will seal
their mission of space diplo-
macy with a handshake. Amer-

ican television networks will
broadcast the ceremony live.
The astronauts and cosmo-
nauts will exchange gifts, docu-
ments and souvenirs, and the
Soviets will give the astronauts
a United Nations flag which the
Apollo crew will bring back.
The Americans will give the
cosmonauts small boxes con-
taining seeds of a special spruce
tree developed by the U.S. For-
estry Service.
Each of the crewmen will visit
the spacecraft of the other coun-
try at least once and the space
voyagers of the two nations will
share meals and conduct joint
science experiments.
Apollo and Soyuz will separate
after two days and then slowly
drift apart in orbit. The Soyuz
will return to earth on Monday
and the Apollo on July 24.

State Senile considers
bill to allow sex education

-OMAPILAINT
," x'G: 4 xar ...missing out
44 Son some of the
DAILIES because
^"i.' St.k3" {l }. ~ y, t" ,3' lY - of delivery-
mistakes?

LANSING (UPI) - Desnite
bitter opposition from parents
and anti-feminist groups, the
state Senate has cleared a bill
for a final vote that would altow
schools to teach students about
contraceeption and venersal di-
sease.
The legislation, sponsored by
Sen. Gilbert Bursley (R-Ann
Arbor) was moved into final
position on a voice vote yester-
day with little debate. Bursley
said a final vote, which was ex-
pected to be close, could come
as early as today.
HAPPINESS of Womanhiod.
Inc. (HOW) and Northeast Moth-
ers Alert distributed flyers say-
ing the bill would authorize in-
struction on socially deviant
sexual beehavior such as hmo-
sexuality, masturbation and be-
stiality.
The HOW group said 'he peg s-
lation would "use the schools
to bring about unwanted, radi-
cal social changes."
"I'd call it hysteria," said
Bursley. "It's absolutely ridicu-
lous."
THE LEGISLATION w o'oi d
authorize school districts to
offer a class dealing with sex
hygiene, contraception and ve-
nereal disease as an elective
program with no penalty for stu-
dents whose parents remove
them from the class.
The State Board of Education,
in cooperation with 'he state
Department of Public Health,
would be ordered to establish
guidelines and approve mate-
rials to be used in teacning the
class.
"All this does is allow a sex
education curriculum ro include
reference to contraception and
venereal disease," Bursley said.
"It's incredible the number of

teenagers who don't know how
babies are made."
HE SAID the only schools that
would offer the sex education
curriculum would be where
elected school board officials
decide to do so.
Under current law, teachers
are prohibited from teaching
birth control or providing ad-
vice or information on the sub-
ject.
Members of the HOW g::oup
said they were concerned the
sex education could eventually
become .mandatory.
"EVEN THOUGH the bill pro-
vides for parental withdrawal
of a child from class where bitth
control is taught, we are con-
cerned about psychological (ais-
age the child may suffer due to
peer pressure when parents ex-
errise right of exclusion," they
said.
if
you
see
news
happen
call
76-DAIL

OR. ..C
disagree with a bill ea - ,
we sent you for THEDAILY?
WE'D LIKE TO TRY TO STRAIGHT-
EN OUT THAT PROBLEM, BUT WE
CAN'T IF YOU DON'T LET US
KNOW ABOUT IT.
Monday thru Friday, 10 AM. to 3 P.M.
CIRCULATION w IficIFkiuu t 764-0558
DEPARTMENT Qj liiju u~ 6-58

the ann arbor film cooperative
PRESENTS
BUSTER KEATON in
GO WEST
Keaton olavs Friendless, a hobo who -noes to Arizona and
becomes a Cowbov. His dearest friend is a cow named Brown
Eves. Tryinq to rescue Brown Eves from a herd destined for
slaughter. Keoton ultimately liberates 350 hood of cattle
into downtown Los Angeles, in a rinotic climax of the film.
See this superb silent Keaton comedy, vintage 1925.
TONIGHT at 7, 8:45 & 10:30 p.m.
AUD. A, ANGELL HALL $1.25
TUESDAY: MIDNIGHT COWBOY ,
WEDNESDAY: KING OF HEARTS
THURSDAY: BLOW-UP

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan