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July 16, 1975 - Image 28

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-07-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Sixteen

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

VMednesda y, July 15, 197!

Page Sixteen THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, July 16, 1 9T

Tro~lley car will
make its 'debut
during Art Fair
(Continued from Page 14) The figure, Slater adds, could
street feasibility study of the be slashed furthers if a $50,000
project. state-approved grant for a simi-
"The major cost of the project lar shuttle that the city consid-
would be the street," explains ered is applied to the trolley
Slater, "But we should be able project.
to get our car running on it for
under fifty thousand dollars." ALTHOUGH Slater empha-

sizes the cars installation, "is a
simple operation - economical
to run," she admits that pitfalls
do exist: "You're going to run
into some flaws and then try
to iron them out."
John Robbins, director of
streets, traffic, and planning,
said, "Running it down the side
of the street is a real engineer-
ing problem. So the only way I
see it would be feasible would
be to pull all the parking off
Liberty and run it down the
center of the street."
Vince Akaimie, city planner,
questioned the project's practi-
cal value, claiming, "We don't
see it as a viable means of
transportation but as an attrac-

tion to the downtown. But we're
(city planning commission) go-
ing to accept what Mrs's Sla-
ter's group proposes if they can
work it out and Council ap-
proves it"
AKAIMIE ADDED, "The idea
has been bounced back and
forth so much that if it does
happen it's going to be a sur-
prise to a number of people -
some days it looks like it's all
set to go and other days we
don't know."
Although the tracks may pose
problems, the $7,000 car is it-.
self in top working order, ac-
cording to Slater. Built of steel,
oak and walnut, "The car has

mahogany etched designs in th
woodwork-and everything fron
the screws to the window frame
are brass," she said.
After operating regularly
Portugal for 7S years, it is ns,
awaiting its fate in a local ware
house. City fire fighters have
volunteered to refurbish it ir
time for its planned display at
the upcoming Ann Arbor Art
Fair.
"We're trying to do this as
inexpensively as possible by
making it a community support-
ed project," explains Slater,
adding that the car was paid
for through private donations
and loans.

Museums: Intriguing, diverse

Continued fromn Page 11)
ful "lions" (they are actually
pumas) at its entrance to greet
more than 131,000 persons every
year. The inside offers four im-
pressive floors of natural s;i-
ense displays.
One of the most fascinating
exhibits at the museum is jis
second-floor "Hall of Evolution"
where the huge skeleton of a
mastadon stands majestically
over awed spectators.
A VARIETY of birds, rvpt es,
amphibians, fish and plants oc-

cupy the museums third?flo o r
"Hall of Michigan Wildlife." The
accompanying notes supply in-
formative background material.
The "Hall of Life" on the up-
permost floor houses more ani-
mal and plant life, geologs' dis-
plays, and an astronomcal al-
cove which offers enjoyable
weekend planetarum sessions.
A few hours of strolling through
the building on a dreary after-
noon, especially for visito-s to
the city, can be highly erter-
taining.
In fact, all three museums are
bound to destroy a few mniscom-

ceptions some people hold to-
ward museums in general. They
are so accustomed to motiofi-
images on television, fast cars
and quick-paced sports even's -
that something which simply
sits there and lets you look at
it automatically seems deadly
dull. For them, the museums
can offer perspectives they pro-
bably cannot get elsewhere. The
atmospherea is a museum --
quiet appreciation of true art, a
reverence for the past - is a
welcome contrast to the money-
seekers and mass production
outside their doors.

Check out-
MARKET PLACE
A year-round
Arts and Crafts Showplace
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
Inside
215 S. State .769-3581

I.

We welcome you to
Ann Arbor's only cafe
and house of games:
RICHARD'S FOLLY
Featuring:
* CHESS .aSOUPS
* SANDWICHES * BRIDGE
* PINBALL * SALADS
and one of her majesty's finest, THE GUVE RNOR
EVERY TUES. EVENING: Free Backgammon lessons
by Bob Bemish, chef and World Speed Chess Mara-
thon Record Holder
OPEN 'TILL MIDNIGHT DAILY

TEss TWO wu MENtae an ice-cream breaka Irum toe rig"
of deciidng what to buy at last year's Art Fair. It is esti-
mated that over 200,000 people will visit this year's Fair from
now until Saturday.
Why not join the DAILY?
THE DAILY ISA AGREAT PLACE TO:
" meet other goad people
" drink 5c Cokes
* learn the operations of a newspaper
" write storms
" see your name in print
* earn a little money
Come on down to 420 Maynard anytime and
join the business, news, sports or photography
staffs!
BARGAIN DAYS
AT
MAST'S SHOES
Wednesday thru Saturday
FRYE BOOTS (Guys & Girls)
15%/ OFF Reg Price
Women's SANDALS & CLOGS
SALE $10 to $20
Men's DEXTER SHOES
$18.90
Men's & Women's
# ,CLARK TREKS -
\~ s $ - ikk S
AL L18.90FNAL
ALL SALES FINAL Wenhr.
MA5TThrs.

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