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July 16, 1975 - Image 24

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-07-16

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, July 16, 1975

Page Twelve

A2 museums: Intrigul g, iverse

By JEFF RISTINE-
Some people invariably at-
tach a derogatorv stereotyne to
all museums. They think in
terms of dusty, dimly-tit dis-
plays of bring and pretentwiis
art and pin "hirhbrow" char-
,acterizations onto culture-lov-
ers. Things of the past, in their
minds, are considered stuffy
and best left 'nasproached.
But for the kind of person at-
tracted to an urt fair, the Uni-
versity's three camos a tnu-
seums - the Museum of Art,
the Kelsey Museum of Ancient
and Medieval Archaeology a a d
the Exhibits Miesesm - are de-
lightfully intriging, diver-e and
positively educational. Better
yet, they're free.
THE MUSEUM of art, locat-
ed at the corner of State St. and
S. University, will probably be
of most interest to those 'w h o
came for the fair.
Besides many colorful contem-
porary paintings and prigs from
American artists, the museums

offers Japanese and Chinese
drawings, sculptures, ceramics
and temporary exhibitions or
loan from other art institutes.
Their collections include ma-
terial - remarkably well p r e-
served - from as far back as
the sixth Century A.D. But the
Museum of Art is not all "tradi-
tional" material. Climb t h e
toll, winding staircase to t h e
second floor of surrealis'ic
sketches, a wood, formica and
plastic sculpture, an Andy War-
hol screenprint called "Electric
Chair" and many examples of
the latest in oil-on-canvas.
EVEN FOR the cyiic, U stroll
through this diverse museum
should prove that art is no'. sim-
ply sunsets, mountains and
landscapes.
But if mummies and marble
urns are more your style, check
out the Kelsey Museum on State
St. near William which special-
izes in University excavations
from the Near Eastern and Med-
iterranean areas. The Richard-

sonian Romanesque structure is
one of the oldest buildings on
campus but surprisingly few lo-
cal persons ever go inside.
Actually, Kelsey is most cn-
cersed with teaching and re-
search, but it leaves 's door;
open to the public for several
hours every .day. Its tir.,-floor
galleries exhibit centucies-old
collections of pottery, panyri
and glassware from ancient
Rome and Dynastic Egypt. A
well-preserved mummy casn is
one of the museum's more pop-
ilar items.
OTHER GALLERIES n t h e
museum rotate their materials:
artifacts from Etruscan Italy,
ancient Greece, -Roman sod Is-
lamic Egypt or. Seluca-on-the-
Tigris might be featured dir:ng
any given week.
Thewide-ranging Ekhibits Mu-
seum, located on North Univer-
sity near the large Dental
Building, has two black, watch-
See MSUEUMS, Page 16

PARTHENON GYROS
It's worth the walk to the
Parthenon Restaura nt on 226 0
S . ai. .fit
".Try our delicious
GYROS and SHISH-KA-BOB
SANDWICHES Q
GYROS SANDWICH - A DELICIOUS CONTINENTAL SPECIALTY 4V
Gyros is a lean blend of specially selected portions of beef and lamb. 4a
It is lightly seasoned and cooked to sear the outside so that the juice and
( flavor are sealed inside. The meat is cooked to order on the Autodoner, i
- which gives it that "charcoal like" flavor.
Served with Raw Onions, Tomatoes on Greek Pita Bread.
G3 SHISH-KA-BOB SANDWICH Succulent, marinated Greek "Ka-Bobs"
#i broiled to perfection and nestled between thick wedges. of our own '
t special Greek Pita Bread.
Served with Onions and Tomatoes.
Featuring, also on our menu:
GYROS PLATE A fine meal in itself, served on a plate with a generous
portion of meat, Raw Onions and Tomatoes.
D MOUSAKA Sauteed egg plant and potatoes covered with a generous
layer of pure ground beef and our special seasoning, then topped with
special cream sauce.
PASTITSIO A hefty portion of pure ground beef and tender macaroni,
slowly baked with a delicate cream sauce topping.
DOLMADES-"STUFFED GRAPE LEAVES" Made with ground beef
mixel with rice, wrapped in grape leaves and topped with a special lem-
on sauce.
SPINACH PIE Fresh spinach mixed with Greek cheese,
COMBINATION PLATE Pastitsio, Mousaka, Dolmades, Spinach Pie,
and Gyros.
0 GREEK SALAD " SOFT DRINKS
" GREEK PASTRIES * COFFEE
* HOMEMADE YOGURT * RICE PUDDING
Come in for an enjoyable Greek Meal orQ
-Take One Home With You -
t 994-1012 226 S. MAIN
MON.-THURS.: 11 a.m.-l 2 midnight; FRI.-SAT.: 11 a.m-3 a.m.;
SUN.: 12-12

The University's museums, including the Museum of Art pic-
tured above, offer perspectives on beauty and form not avail-
able elsewhere and are bound to destroy a few misconceptions
people hold toward museums in general.
Artist strives for excellence

(continued from Page 9)
residents have had a chance to
check it out at the annual Free
Arts Festivals. This year he'll
be on E. University St in-booth
N-4.
Being totally absorbed in hs
work, it is both a hobby and a
vocation for him, While talking
about it, he rarely sat tor sore
than five minutes at once. He
would rise from the living-room
sofa to find a book on a turn-of-
the-century art noveau architect
or stained-glass craftsman to il-
lustrate a point he is making.
Then it would be out to the
workshop to look at his major
interest of the moment nerklac-
es made of colorful vitrified
stone, a material he is experi-

menting with. Other times the
point will be illustrated with a
porcelain cup, blown-glass vase
or table lamp which he has
made.
SINGLING a parti ular 1940's
luke-box out of his collection to
point out the difference between
art noveau and art deco, Jef-
ferson patted a se :'on of its
wood veneer.
"I bought this because I thiink
it epitomizes art deco. Look at
the simple lines, its design .. .
this wood is real walnut, not
plastic." And, glancing in at
the turntable: "Just think, there
are more than 800 moving parts
in this thing."

A - SQUARE
TOBACCONIST
1233 South University
Ann Arbor, Michigan
662-8191
CHARA TAN SECONDS
$12.50
Come and browse through our selection of aged
briars, and fill your pipe at our tobacco bar.

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