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July 10, 1975 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-07-10

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Thursday, July 10, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

Thursday, July 10, 1975 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Five

Mental health legislation
restricting patient release
awaits Milliken's approval

(Continued from Page 3)
procedures controlling the re-
lease of mental patients.
Steven Schwartz, an assist-
ant defender for the State Apr-
pellate Defender's office in De-
troit, and the attorney who ar-
gued the McQuillan case last
year before the state supreme
court, thinks the bills are nei-
ther constitutional nor socially
productive.
S C H W A R T Z feels the
new "guilty but mentally ill
plea" will do little more than
give juries the illusion that they
are acting in a humane, pro-
gressive manner, when in fact
the bill is nothing but an avoid-
ance of the real problems fac-
ing the care of the mentally
ill.
In a report he wrote for the
House, analysing the two bills,
Schwartz noted that the ex-
pansion of involuntary commit-
ment criteria "cannot withstand
scrutiny under either recent
constitutional cases . . . or
u n d e r Fourteenth Amend-
ment 'void for vagueness'
tests."
Schwartz described the mea-
sure as "fatally defective bec-
ause it requires no finding of
dangerousness to self or others
in order to deprive an individ-
ual of his or her freedom."
HE concluded that the mea-
sure was "inconsistent with
both this state's goal encourag-
ing voluntary mental health
treatment and expansion of
community facilities as with
the similar national trend, fed-
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erally and locally."
Rep. Paul Rosenbaum (D-
Battle Creek), Chairman of the
House Judiciary Committee,
and co-sponsor of the bills, yes-
terday called the libertarian
argument "all wet" and the Mc-
Quillan decision "a travesty in
terms of the present situation
in this state." He claims that
the bills have sufficient consti-
tutional safeguards, and will
eliminate abuse of the NGRI
plea.
"It (opposition to the bill) is
totally nonsensical in the face
of the horrendous crimes that
have been committed in this
state."
STATE Senator Gilbert Burs-
ley (R-Ann Arbor), who voted
for both bills admitted that
their constitutionally is "a very
genuine question" but felt that
in balancing the public safety
with the civil liberties of those
in state institutions, the bills
were in the public interest.
Rep. Perry Bullard (D-Ann
Arbor(, one of only ten House
members who opposed the bills,
said in a statement issued by
his office yesterday that the
laws amount to "support for
making eccentric behavior a
crime."
"The courts have held that
mentally ill people have the
same constitutional rights as
the rest of us, including the
right not to be deprived of
liberty or property without due
process of law," said Bullard.
DR. Paul C. Uslan
OPTOMETRIST
Full Contact Lens Service
Visual Examinations
548 CHURCH ST.
663-2476

Weather
Traveler:'
By KURT HARJU
Electronic jazz has been per-
fectly respectable ever since
M i i e s Davis' groundbreaking
work in the field, but it's re-
mained largely up to a newer
generation raised on and by him
(as sidemen in his ever-chang-
ing backup groun) to make it
popularly accepted. Such fa-
mous artists as John Mclaugh-
lin, Chick Corea and Herbie
Hancock began with Davis and
then went on to head their own
top-drawing acts.
But the off-shoot that has had
the most effect and impact on
the direction of this complex
music is Weather Report which
was founded by keyboardist Jo-
sef Zawinul and saxophonist
Wayne Shorter.
WITH THE release of their
fifth album Tale Spinnin' (Col.
33417), they've proven that elec-
tronics can provide limitless
ways of improving and enhanc-
ing regular jazz structures -

especially (and surprisingly) in
melody and harmony - by pro-
ducing six new pieces that ex-
pand upon even the group's ori-
ginal scope and previous work.
As they define it now, their
music is an effort (and a unique-
ly successful one) to achieve
"the musical point" - where
the rhythm, the melody and the
harmony co-exist and come to-
gether in "exquisite moments."
Tale Spinnin' is such a testa-
ment to faith - a setting that
deliberately evokes the music of
other cultures to show how uni-
versal the belief in it is.
IT'S AN exotic mixture of
dynamic Afro-Latin rhythms
played electronically against a
backdrop of traditionally Amer-
ican jazz.
Two features stand out in the
group's process of realizing this
vision - the strength of Zawin-
ul's compositions and the beauty
of Shorters' saxophone that
emerges as the chief solo in-

Report's 'Mysterious
Exotic summer jazz

strument on this LP. "Between
the Thighs" and "Bedia" are
probably the best cuts set in
the spirit of the work's objec-
tives - they swing in a manner
that reveals a story or suggests
a place. As Zawinul proposes,
"Out music is a reflection of the
state where you arrive as a hu-
man being."
That reflection is essentially
joyful - a colorful festival of
sounds complete with fireworks
on the record jacket and an ar-
ray of tasteful photographs on
the cover. While the group re-
mains as tight as they were on
their last outing Mysterious
Traveler, they gain by return-
ing a bit to the richly-melodic
rhythms that highlighted Sweet-
nighter. And like that earlier
album, this is cool summer jazz
-easy to take and easier to like
once you let it get under your
skin.

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by
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& Tam Jones
' jjAT THE
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phone: 769-2200, 65-8221

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