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June 19, 1975 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-06-19

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Thursday, June 19, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page five

Wallace apparently plans race College graduates face
in '76; appeals to middle class limited 'ob opportunities

(Continued from Page 1)
fully express their viewpoint,"
the Governor told the cheering
audience as he wrapped up a
45-minute speech.
Although Wallace indicated
he will make "a more formal
announcement" at a later date
regarding his presidential
plans, his remarks yesterday
were the strongest thus far on
the subject.
Wallace has run for President
twice before. Campaigning on
the American Independent par-
ty ticket in 1968, the three time
governor received about 10 mil-
lion votes.
THREE YEARS AGO, Wal-
lace sought the Democratic
party nomination, but his drive
fell apart in May 1972 after a
gunman's assassination attempt
left him paralyzed from the
waist down.
Wallace did not say whether

he would again run as a third
party candidate, if he cannot
win the Democratic nod.
A number of leading Demo-
crats have already said they
will not support a presidential
ticket that includes the Ala-
bama governor.
WITH A good deal of brava-
do, Wallace yesterday attacked
"the permissive courts," stress-
ed the need for more law and
order, and called for a revamp-
ed tax structure - all favorite
topics of his.
"We (the working class) have
to support the ultra-rich on the
one hand, and those who refuse
to work on the other," Wallace
said to a round of spontaneous
applause. "Taxes have almost
carried under the people who
have made this country what
she is."
Wallace devoted only a few
minutes of the anecdote - laden
speech to his presidential bid.

IN PART, he said that he
will be involved in the 1976
race "to carry the message"
that the middle class will not
allow itself to be crushed by
the elites.
"Your day is coming - 1976
is the year to get this country
turned around," Wallace told
the audience of several thous-
and small businessmen from
across the country.
Earlier in the speech, Wallace
chastised Congress and the
President for failing to fulfill
promises to aid the middle class
and added: "If I were here
I'd do the best I could and
wouldn't just give lip service to
you."
SIMILAR REFERENCES to
what the governor would do if
he held elective office in fed-
eral government were sprink-
led throughout the extempor-
aneous remarks.
But Wallace continually stop-
ped short of flatly stating he
would run for President.
The field of declared presi-
dential candidates in the Dem-
ocratic party lacks a clear front
runner, and none of the hope-
fuls has yet demonstrated a
broad base of supprt among
his colleagues or the American
people.
That factor coupled with a
well-oiled Wallace campaign
could make the governor a very
powerful figure at next year's
Democratic convention.

Ford's campaign
committee formed

CHICAGO (P) - This year's "I CAN'T remember w h e n
950,004 college graduates a r e there was such a large cutback
facing a much tighter job mar- in so short a period," he said.
ket than expected, but most will "By the middle of January,
find some kind of work, a na- . or certainly after the first quar-
tional survey reported yester- ter's earning reports, m a n y
day. companies realized things were
The report indicates that the worse than expected and they
nation's largest businesses a r e had to cut back on costs," he
seeking one-third fewer graduat- said. "Hiring new graduates
as than they expected to only was one of those costs."
six months ago. "A great num-
ber of firms seriously underesti- Endicott said, however, that
mated the force of the economic salaries a pear to be 5 to 8
decline," said Frank Endicott, per cent higher than last year
and said there will be work for
retired director of placement at most graduates if they 1 o o k
Northwestern University. long and hard enough
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11 i

(Continued from Page 1)
lug campaign funds and or-
ganizing a campaign headquar-
ters office.
But the decision also catches
the crest of Ford's rising
popularity. Polls taken since the
Mayaguez crisis have shown
Ford - something of an also-
ran in earlier surveys - is now
running ahead of such figures
as Sen. Edward Kennedy, (D-
Mass.) and Gov. George Wal-
lace of Alabama.
Asked howbdeeply involved
Ford would become in cam-
paign activities, Nessen told
reporters:
"MANY OF the details sim-
ply haven't been decided yet
and that's one of them."
Responding to another ques-
tion, Nessen saidathe name of
the Ford campaign committee
would not include any refer-
ence to Vice President Nelson
Rockefeller. Speaking for Ford,
the press secretary had said
earlier in the week that Ford
wants Rockefeller as his 1976
running mate - but is leaving
that decision to the Republican
nominating convention.
He said Ford would file
papers giving official status to
his campaign committee with
the new federal election cam-
paign commission by tomorrow
-a technical step required by
law - and would name his
campaign finance chairman
and treasurer by the same day
WHITE HOUSE SOURCES
said California industrialist Da-
vid Packard will be named fi-
nance chairman.
Nessen said Dean Burch, who
h e a d s the informal Ford
campaign advisory committee
set up a month ago, will over-
see the formal new campaign
committee until Callaway re-
signs the Pentagon post he has
held since 1971 in early July.
Callaway and Ford are old
personal and political friends.
They served together in
Congress in 1965 through 1967,
SHORT or LONG
HAIRSTYLES TO PLEASE
DASCOLA
BARBERS
ARBORLAND--971-9975
MAPLE VILLAGE-761-2733
E. LIBERTY-668-9329
E. UNIVERSITY-662-0354

when Callaway represented the
Columbus, Ga., congressional
district..
Callaway ran for governor
of Georgia on the Republican
ticket in 1966.

m
t
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