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June 12, 1975 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-06-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

?a§e Ten THE MIC-4IGAN DAILY

Page Teri

THE MICHIGAN DA1X14'

Court of appeals
state to buy 150

LANSING (UPI) - The state
of Michigan has been ordered
to submit a plan for the
'speedy acquisition" of 150
school buses to be used in the
Detroit school integration pro-
gram.
The order issued yesterday
by the U.S. 6th Circuit Court of
Appeals in Cincinnati may have
improved chances that the
busing program will be started
this fall.

THE ATTORNEY GENER-
AL'S office must submit the pur-
chasing plan to the court next
Tuesday.
For the time being, however,
the question of who will pick up,
the. $2.4 million tab for the
buses remains unanswered.
Although . the state h a d
initially been ordered to pay for
the buses D e p u t y Attorney
General Stanley Steinborn said
it may now be possible to work
out an arrangement under
which the Detroit School
District could borrow the mon-
ey from the state.
THE APPEALS COURT order
handed down yesterday did not
specify where the money would
come from.
Attorney General Frank
Kelley said the court order
stipulated simply "that the pro-
cedure be consistent with state
and local fiscal procedures
while not financially disrupting

orders
buses
the Detroit school system."
U. S. District Judge Robert
DeMascia of Detroit had order-
ed the state, which is a defen-
dant in the desegregation case,
to pay for the buses. The ap-
peals court stayed that order
May 27.
KELLEY HAS CONTENDED
that the state should not be re-
quired to buy the buses because
it has not committed any acts
of segregation and that it could
not make such a purchase with-
out legislative approval.
The Detroit School Board has
claimed it cannot afford to buy
the buses.
DeMascio has been holding
hearings on various plans for
integrating the Detroit schools.
The U. S. Supreme Court sent
the case back to district court
after rejecting a plan that
would have involved cross-dis-
tricting busing with the sub-
urbs.

MORNING PAPER
IS WORTH
MORE THAN
5c,
(Our Subscribers Think So, Too)
THEY ASK US TO DELIVER TO
THEIR DOOR EACH DAY...
* Latest National and Local News from AP and UPI Wires
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" Critical Analysis of Local and National Issues
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The Most Interesting Classified Pages
Outside The Berkeley News
* And More-Five Mornings a Week!
IT'S ALL IN THE
Latest Deadline In The State:
CALL 764-0558 FOR DELIVERY

Floor show
Former dance student Betty Ford returned yesterday to her
ballet alma mater, the Martha Graham School in New York,
to chat with the veteran choreographer (right). A performer
rehearsing for an upcoming school concert is reflected in the
studio mirror behind them.
Unit votes to restore
citizenship of Lee

W A S H I N G T O N (UPI)
-A House judiciary subcom-
mittee voted 3-1 today to re-
store the citizenship of Confed-
erate Gen. Robert E. Lee.
The bill was sent to the full
Judiciary Committee after the
lone dissenter, Rep. Elizabeth
Holtzman (D-N.Y.) lost an at-
tempt to attach a general am-
nesty for all those who renoun-
ced citizenship to protest the
Vietnam War.
ON OCT. 2, 1865, six months
after lie surrendered the Army
of Northern Virginia, Lee swore
an oath of allegiance to the
United States before a notary
George will talk
to you.
He can be a
friend.
Union Bowling

public and mailed the oath to
Washington. The oath was
required of Confederate offic-
ers before their citizenshilp
would be restored.
L~ee died five years laier
without ever getting his citizen-
ship back, although the rest of
his relatives who fought for the
South had received theirs. Pres-
ident Andrew Johnson apparent-
ly never received the doci-
mett.
The Senate passed the citize-
ship restoration bill on April 1
Only approval by two-thirds o
the House stands in the way at
Lee's posthumous citizenship
dassif~ed

Theatre Company of Inn Arbor, Inc.
PRESENTS
BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND
AA
MAQNNAS
an original production celebrating the
forward and positive movement of women
fri., June 13 Schorling Aud.
n e (in the School of Ed.
Sat, June14 elda on Est u.)
DONATION $2.00 . CWTAIN AT 6:00 P.M.

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