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June 10, 1975 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-06-10

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Tuesday, June 10, 1975 THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Conservatives win school board seats

Page Five
Nedzi will not

I

(Continued from Page1)
John Heald, who called for a
return to basic educational pro-
grams in his campaign, came
in second with 6,850 votes. "I'm
very pleased and honored to be
selected," Heald said last night
when the final elections returns
were posted at Pioneer High
School. "We all worked very
hard."
Heald had supported the mill-
age increase request, but said
he was "ready to go to work"
on the school budget without
the additional funds.
A six-year veteran of the
school board, Warner picked up
a third term with 6,521 votes.
Warner said he spent more
time as head of the district's
millage drive than he did on
his own campaign. "My prime
concern was the millage," he
said.
WARNER ALSO said
he would recommend that the
board return to the city's voters
in August with another millage
hike request. He said the re-
quest, however,;should be con-
oled with a list of proposed cot-
backs which would show the
community exactly what would
be lost if they defeated the mea-
sure-.
If cutbacks are ultimately
necessary, Warner said, "they
should be across-the-board. Ev-
erybody has to take their share
of the cuts." Hut Warner added
that he felt so cuts should come
from school reading programs.
Dukes, Warner and Heald ap-
peared in joint newspaper ad-
vertisements and topped the
polls in Ward 3, 4 and 5.

IN THE First and Second
W a r d s, however, Charles
Moody, Sr., was the top vote-
getter. Liberal candidate D.
Stephen McCargar and Jerome
Epstein came in after Moody
in the student - dominated Sec-
ond Ward, which also approved
all three millage proposals.
Voter turnout was lightest in
Ward 2.
Moody came in fourth, with
4,781 votes, citywide. Trailing
him were: Epstein, 3,673; Mc-
Cargar, 2,949; George Wright,
1,275; Maxine Henson, 1,160;
Shelley Ettinger, 825 and Ber-
nice Sobin, 592.
McCargar, who pokingly re-
ferred to the election results
as "a sweep by the creeps,"
said earlier organization of his
campaign might have improved
his chances of election. He
stressed wasteful areas of the
school board budget and advo-
cated greater equity in the
salaries of school administra-
tors and other employes during
his bid for a board seat.
McCARGAR said last night he
does not intend to run for a
board seat next year.
Henson, however, said she
would try again for a seat on
the nine-member board.
Wright, who arrived in time
to see the earliest election re-
turns posted, said the results
were "the way I would have
guessed it would turn out"
Commenting on the defeat of
Proposition A, Wright said
"the times are just not right for
a tax increase."
Human Rights Candidate
Shelley Ettinger, the only hope-

ful with formal political-party
backing in the traditionally non-
partisan race, made her best
showing in the First Ward,
where she came in seventh.
She finished ninth in the Sec-
ond Ward. Ettinger called for
a "community control board"
to be established in every
school during her campaign.
E T T I N G E R was the on-
ly candidate who opposed all
three millage requests.
Proposition B, a 3 mill re-
newal for the school system,
was passed 9,282 votes to 4,235.
It. was easily approved in all
five wards and in nearly every
city precinct. Passage of the
millage request does not in-
crease property taxes but sim-
ply renews a levy already in
effect.
Voters also gave the nod to
Proposition C-a 1 mill renew-
al for the public library system
- 9,501 to 4,062.
PR O P O S IT I ON A
was approved only in Wards
2 and 3.
The most controversial issues
in the school board race gener-
ally involved money - where
it should come from and how it
should be spent. Backers of the
millage increase proposal cit-
ed a multi - million dollar loss
in state aid, inflation and the
added costs of government-
mandated programs andspecial
education programs as the rea-
sons the school district needed
additionalsfunds.
Superintendent of Schools
Harry Howard said last night
he was "very disappointed"
that the proposed tax hike
failed. He said that he hopes the
school board will return the
question to the voters this fall.
Assistant to the Superinten-
dent LeRoy Cappaert said the
margin of support for Proposi-
tion A - more than 47 per cent
-was "very favorable in light
of (current) economic circum-
stances."
G"T
YOU will look
casual and feel
comfortable.
UM STYLISTS
at the UNION

give ,up
WASHINGTON (1) - Rep Lu-
cien Nedzi (D-Mich.) refused to
resign yesterday as chairman of
the House committee investigat-
ing U. S. intelligence agencies
but agreed to the compromise
creation of a new subcommit-
tee to take over investigation of
the Central Intelligence Agency.
"It's the hope that in that
manner, we can put to rest any
concerns about allegations that
my functioning as the commit-
tee chairman represent some
kind of conflict of interest,"
Nedzi said.
THE COMPROMISE w a s
workeh out in a meeting be-
tween Nedzi, House leaders
and the five committee Demo-
crats who gave up an effort to
oust him as part of the com-
promise.
The drive to dump Nedzi had
erupted last week on grounds
the CIA told him more than a
year ago about past discussions
of political assassinations plots
and spying on U. S. antiwar
protesters and that he did noth-

Mchai~r
ing about it.
Nedzi told newsmen after the
meeting that the subcommit-
tee taking over the CIA investi-
gation will have its own sepa-
rate staff.
HE SAID the compromise
was not unanimously approved
but that no vote was taken to
measure how much opposition
there was to it.
"One the most important
things in my mind is to have a
thorough and fair investiga-
tion," Nedzi said in announcing
the compromise.
The five committee Demo-
crats tried and failed to get
Speaker Carl Albert's support
for the move at a meeting yes-
terday afternoon.
The drive to oust Nedzi broke
out Thursday when the commit-
tee Democrats charged that the
CIA told him more than a year
ago about discussions of politi-
cal assassinations and about ag-
ency spying on U.S. antiwar
protesters and he did nothing
about it.

Ford to release
CIA report today

(ontinued from Page 1)
but quickly added "there is no
possibility of any cover-up" be-
cause the information is being
given to the Attorney General.
The President also said he
would not "become a Monday
m o r n i n g quarterback" and
stand in judgement of how pre-
vious administrations used the
CIA-a task he claimed be-
longed to the historians.
Furthermore, Ford declared
the CIA has not been irrepar-
ably damaged by recent allega-
tions about its activities and
that the Rockefeller report will
play an important part in re-
storing the Agency's battered
image.
ON OTHER topics brought up
during the half hour question
and answer session, Ford said
he foresees an upturn in the
economy "because it has bot-
tomed out and we are now get-
ting a lot more good news than

bad."
While the recent announce-
ment that unemployment has
hit 9.2 per cent-the highest
level since World War II-is dis-
couraging; the President noted
the number of people employed
has actually risen, which he
considers a positive sign.
"The country is making head-
way in the battle against infla-
tion," Ford added, predicting
that the economic picture for
1976 looks even brighter.
Ford also said:
-he tentatively plans to meet
with Soviet leader Leonid Brezh-
nev in a major summit confer-
ence sometime this fall;
-the United States must
maintain a military force in
South Korea to keep peace
there; and
-"there can be no doubt
about my intentions" regarding
the Presidency in 1976, but re-
fused -to say when he would for-
mally announce his candidacy.

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-TONIGHT-
ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S 1951
STRANGERS ON A TRAIN
Two men meet on a train, and one suggests they kil each other's trouble-
some relatives. Raymond Chandler worked on this screenplay of Pauline
Koel's favorite of Hitchcock's American films. Great performances by
Robert Walker and Marion Lorne. AUD. B, ANGELL HALL, 7 & 9 p.m.
$1.25
PLUS
THE KING OF HEARTS
Always worth seeing again. This popular anti-war comedy stars Genvieve
Bujold and Alan Bates. AUD. A, ANGELL HALL, 7 & 9 p.m. $1.25
WED.: THE KING OF HEARTS
THURS.: Dustin Hoffman in ALFREDO, ALFREDO
-- FRI.: TRACY HEPBURN DOUBLE FEATURE

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