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June 05, 1975 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-06-05

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Pooe Si

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

T hur sdoy, June 5, 1975

PoneSxTEMCIA ALYTusaJn ,17

Senate
(Continued from Page 1)
Chairman John Stennis (D-
Miss.) of the Senate Armed
Services Committee said his
committee, in an item by item
study, already had trimmed the
"fat" from the procurement
program proposed by the Penta-
gon.
T H E B I L L recommended
by the committee would auth-
orize $25 billion in spending for
weapons in the fiscal year of
1976 and $5.3 billion for the
three-month transitional period
to the new federal fiscal year
beginning Oct. 1, 1976. The
Pentagon had requested $29.8
billion for the 12-month fiscal
year and $5.9 billion for the
transitional period.
President F o r d's appeal
against cuts in the defense bud-
get was made in a commence-
ment address at the U. S.
Military Academy in West
Point, N.Y.
Just back from talks with
European leaders, Ford said
that resisting defense cuts was
one of two ways Congress could
demonstrate to allies and po-

rejects arms cut

Senator Ervin blasts
Defense spy system

tential foes "that Americans
have lost neither their nerve
nor their national will." The
other, he said, is passing a 10-
year domestic energy develop-
ment program.
"IT IS my firm conviction
that we cannot afford further
erosion in our bedrock defense
budget," the President said
amid applause. "I will fight
hard to prevent it."
He said he believes Ameri-
cans in 1975 are willing to pay
for the protection of their lawful
interests and that is why he con-
tinues to push for the program
aimed at making the United
States independent of foreign
oil.
"This could be another con-
vincing demonstration to our
allies and to our adversaries
that Americans have lost nei-
ther their nerve nor their na-
tional will," he said.
HE S A I D he was most
encouraged to find "a new
sense of unity and a confidence
in the United States," at the
NATO meeting in Brussels.
Ford, a former Navy man,

was the first president to ad-
dress the West Point graduates
since John Kennedy in 1962.
At West Point he sat through
the entire graduation ceremony
on a pleasant day and present-
ed diplomas to the first 43
graduates, who represented the
too five per cent of their class
of 849 students.
He also handed a diploma to
the cadet ranked last, Eugene
Emmett Shaw, Jr., Danville,
Ill., known in West Point tra-
dition as "the goat."
Before he left West Point,
Ford granted the cadets remis-
sion of "all ordinary punish-
ment immediately and without
delay." The underclassmen,
several hundred of whom have
such punishments pending,
laughed and applauded with
white-gloved hands. Such re-
mission of punishment is a tra-
dition when a head of state vis-
its the academy.
Rudy May compiled an 8 and
4 record with the New York
Yankees last season after being
obtained in mid-June from the
California Angels.

(OM A NT 0
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OR.. . .
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we sent you for THE DAIL.Y?
W E'D LIK E T O T RY T O ST RAIGH T -/\ l4
EN OUT T HAT PROBLEM, BUT WE
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(Continued from Page 1)
a free society. You have to take
some of these things with a
grain of salt."
NBC News correspondent Ford
Rowan said on Monday night's
"NBC Nightly News" program
that the Defense Department
had used a national scientific
computer network to transfer
the secret files to 20 colleges
and private institutions, as well
as the FBI and Central Intelli-
gence Agency (CIA).
Rowan claimed the files
were established in the late '60s
on orders of then-President
Lyndon Johnson, who asked the
CIA, FBI, and the Army to
organize a comprehensive sur-
veillance program of anti-war
protest groups.
ERVIN yesterday strongly re-
iterated his 1970 argument that
Johnson had no authority to
start such a sweeping intelli-
gence probe. "I think it was a
usurnation of authority. I think
the President acted contrary to
law when he used the Army in-
telligence agents as a national
detection force," he stated.
"The excuse they gave were
the riots they had in some of
the cities. They claimed that
justified them putting civilians
under surveillance so they could
prophesize when there was go-
ing to be a civil disturbance,"
Ervin continued.
"But they even infiltrated
churches where there was no
civil disturbance, college cam-
puses where there also was
none, and a whole lot of other
civilians."
ERVIN indicated groups other
t h a n anti-war organizations
were eventually included in the
military intelligence investiga-
tions.
"They were in some respects
sort of impartial," he noted.
"They spied on the John Birch
Society as well as on more left-
wing organizations - anything
that was off color and didn't
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agree with the administration's
policies on Vietnam or the
draft. But most of the folks they
collected information on were
young people."
Much of the information was
gathered in an informal, hap-
hazard fashion, Ervin said.
"Mostly they would go out and
take nictres in rallies and then
trv and identify individuals and
start collecting information on
them. Some of what they got
was ahosut their nolitical views,
in some cases about their finan.
cial standing, and sometimes
even about some of their kin-
folk." he exolained in his fam-
o'is slow Southern drawl.
"THEY NOT only collected
information on editors who de-
fended the right to dissent and
the war orotesters, but they
ex'en collected information on
clerevmen who expressed some
svnnathv with the right to dis-
sent - olthoiugh they destroyed
all that."
Ervin commented that new
f e d e r a I legislation imnosing
tighter controls on surveillance
activities of government agen-
cies may prohibit future at-
tempts at establishing a broad
domestic intelligence network.
He cautioned, however, that
the major intelligence gather-
ing organizations were not sub-
ject to the new statute. "It does
exempt the law enforcement
agencies, like the FBI and
CIA," he said.
"But they still have to make
a report every year as to what
computers or other data col-
lecting systems they have, and
generally who is included in
them-although not by name."
If
see
news
happen
call
76-DAILY

Ass Arbor-- 197!
Greek Festival
1 Friday, June 6, Saturday, June 7, and Sunday, June 8
GREEK FOOD BAKE SALE
1 '00 Midnsu Entertainment 'to id"i"ht
Live Bouzouki Band
Evening Admission:
$100
St Nichohis Greek Orthodox Church
Anal Y

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