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June 04, 1975 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-06-04

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Wednesday, June 4, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

President approves new sex Milliken appoints Flint tax
discrimination requirements attorney as new Regent

(Continued from Page 1)
ball and basketball or other
contact sports separately if
there is sufficient interest
among women to warrant it,"
said HEW secretary Caspar
Weinberger.
The new rules indicate that
where men are afforded oppor- .
tunitIes for athletic scholar-
ships, women also should be
given the same opportunities.
Donald Canham, director of
the Athletic Department is out
of town and a department
spokesman said no one else
could comment on the new
regulations.
THE National Collegiate Ath-
letic Association (NCAA) tried
without success to exempt to-
tally the major men's revenue
producing sports like football
and basketball, claiming that
equal application of the new
guidelines in these sports would
place an inordinate drain on
school resources.
Immediately after Weinber-
ger's announcement, Michael
Scott, representing the NCAA,
read a statement in which he
said the Ford administration
continues to ignore the need to
permit income generation by
revenue producing sports to be
used in maintaining the oper-
ation of those sports by our
member institutions rather
than be diffused over the entire
athletic program.
"We believe the refusal of the
administration to afford such
treatment to revenue-producing
sports, particularly at a time
of severe economic difficulty
for all educational institutions
may well signal the end of the
intercollegiate programs as we
have known them in recent
decades," he said.
THE ONLY CHANGE which
the Admissions Office antici-
pates is the elimination of a
question concerning marital
status on admission forms.
Clifford Sjogren, director of
admissions, said "We do not
have quotas for sex, though we
do practice affirmative action
for women in Engineering and
for men in Nursing."
He added that the changes
made in the admission applica-
tion could make the University
the only school in Michigan this
year which complies with the
new rules.
THOMAS BUTTS, director of
the Office of Financial Aid, said
that the University is currently
in compliance with the new
rules in his area. He anticipates
"no rmajor impact" from them.
The rules will become effec-
tive July 21 unless Congress
rejects them. Michigan Rep-
resentative James O'Hara, a
Democrat has indicated that
his House Labor and Education
subcommittee on Higher Educa-
tion will hold hearings on the
re'lations beginning Junt 23.
Congress has to decide whe-
ther the rules are incompli-
ance with the law. The rules
A little luck,
A little skill,
gets you a
FREE GAME
UNION LANES

were prepared under Title IX of
the Education Amendments of
1972, which bars discrimination
by sex in federally financed
school programs.
B E S I D E S SPORTS
and classroom assignments, the
regulations cover virtually ev-
ery activity of schools and col-
leges, including employment
and promotions, admissions to
colleges and graduate schools,
health benefits, pensions and
disgrimination in dress codes
and hair styles.
The rules will apply to virtu-
ally all public school systems,
as well as most public and pri-
vate colleges receiving federal
funds of any kind. Private ele-
mentary schools and high
schools will be exempt, unless
they receive federal funds.
Under a draft sent to Ford
Feb. 28 by Weinberger, the
schools would have to treat
males and females equally in
athletics, housing, dress codes
and financial assistance.
UNDER THE DRAFT, ele-
mentary and secondary schools
would be forbidden from sepa-
rating boys and girls into shop
and home economics classes or
from maintaining sexually sepa-
rate vocational schools.
At both the school and col-
lege level, coed physical educa-
tion classes would be required,
although the draft would per-
mit separating the sexes in
contact sports and when sex
education is provided.
The National Organization of
Women, joined by 12 other
groups, has criticized the draft
for failing to prohibit sexism in
elementary and secondary text-
books, biased fringe benefits for
school employes and discrimina-
tory admissions policies in pri-
vate colleges.
THE PROPOSED rules are

called the Title IX rules be-
cause they interpret that part
of a 1972 education law.
Title IX provides that, "No
person in the United States
shall on the basis of sex, be
excluded from participation in,
be denied the benefits of, or
be subjected to discrimination
under any education program
or activity receiving federal
financial assistance."
Congress has exempted from
the law all military schools and
colleges, including the service
academies, and any practices in
religious schools or colleges
based on religious tenets.
IN LANSING, the State Board
of Education says it does not
foresee any major problems in
complying with the new regu-
lations.
"It may take as long as three
years to comply fully," a
spokesman said, "but that is
because of the time needed to
complete the transition and not
because we intend to drag our
heels."
The spokesman said integra-
tion of physical education class-
es in Michigan will start in the
fall in lower grades and possi-
bly in mid-elementary school
classes.
BUT HIGHER grades, high
school and college class inte-
gration will take a bit longer, he
said. because of curriculum and
chiefly educational questions.
"Maybe some coaches won't
like it," he added, "but that's
the way the ball is going to
bounce."
Michigan State's 1974 football
team compiled a 7-3-1 record,
its best since the Spartans won
the Big Ten and national cham-
pionships with a 9-0-1 mark in
1966.

(Continued from Page 1)
The commission is a quasi-judi-
cial body empowered to hear
complaints filed by state ele-
mentary and secondary teach-
ers regarding tenure proced-
ures. Laro resigned as commis-
sion chairman yesterday.
Phillip Kearney, an associate
superintendent of the MSDE,
described Laro as "a good com-
mission member." He added
that Laro "will make a fine
Regent."
HIS PREDECESSOR on the
Board, State Justice Lindemer,
was "very pleased" with Laro's
appointment.
"There were several excel-
lent candidates for the posi-
tion," said Lindemer, "and
Larry certainly has to be rated
as one of them."
University President Robben
Fleming, learning of Laro's ap-
pointment yesterday, said he
did not know him, but that he
had "heard good things about
him."

"HE SEEMED very anxious
to learn about the Regents,"
commented Fleming.
Reflecting on his years as a
student at the University, Laro,
who was a political science ma-
jor, said he was interested in
many kinds of political activi-
ties. The Flint native was a
member of the University de-
bating team and president of
Zeta Beta Tau, a fraternity
which folded in 1967.
Laro described the height of
his forensics career as a match
with the Oxford debating team
held in Rackham Auditorium.
"WE DEBATED on the topic
of whether or not the United
States should convert to the
British system of broadcasting,"
said Laro.
"The campus was not as ac-
tive politically as it became in
subsequent years," he said. "I
did do a bit of work for George
Romney when he was running
for governor."

TONIGHT
THE KING OF HEARTS
Popular Anti-war comedy starring Alan Bates
and Genevieve Bujold.
7 & 9 p.m. Aud. A, Angell Hall $1.25
THURSDAY
THE RULING CLASS
1972
Peter O'Toole is the star of this black comedy
satirizing the British upper class.
7 & 9:45 p.m. Aud. A, Angell Hall $1.25
SHIRLEY CLARKE'S 1967
PORTRAIT OF JASON
A Cinema-verite portrait of a 33-year-old homo-
sexual black male prostitute. Shot in a 12 hour
period and edited. Jason bares himsefl before
the camera. From hysterical female impersona-
tions and tales of his sexual adventures to the
despair beneath his laughter.
FRI.: Yarda's LES CREATURES
Cinema Guild O'D ARCH. AUD.
M.ONLY $1

603' east 'fiby
.0A
Please call theatre for
special showtimes!
DYAN CANNON
CII oI) UNDER
IEAF
Wed. a 13 5-7-9 p.m,
Onesn 12:45
WEDNESDAY IS
tt BARGAIN DAY!
Until 5 p.m-all seats $1.00
i~t~tttiiii'li itt~zrx~stsi rsv.s Thursday at 7 & 9 p.m.
NAitONsL WARD F0[555 w Open 6:45
HURRY! ENDS.SOON!
STARTS TODAY
Shows Wed. at
1-3 -10-5:15-7:20-9:30
T Wed, is Baraini Day-
All seats $1.00 ti 5
Thurs.-Fri. at 7-9:10 only
Open 6:45
Expect allfhat theotion icture screen y
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