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June 03, 1975 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-06-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

#age Ten

THE M-ICHi N DAILY

Tuesday, June 3, ; 975

~oge Ten THE MICHIGAN £~A4LY Tuesday, June 3, 1915

Few jobs for graduates

'U' prof. to bargain
release of hostages'

(Ceu tin sed froim Page 3)
P E OP LE still "in demand
include majors in pure science
and math jobs not related to
teaching. Since last year, bach-
elors in technical fields have
seen only a 7 per cent drop,
while business bachelors slump-
ed 28 per cent.
Local and state governments
hired 18 per cent more degree
holders over last year, and pe-
troleum industry hiring prose 4
per cent. Predictably, the moat
severe drop was in the automo-
tive and construction industries,
with a 60 per cent slump for
each.

The general 18 per coast drop
since last year is the most se-
vere decline since 19701-71 when
a 27 per cent slump confronted
grads,.
"IT'S A little easier for a
well-trained minority member
or woman to find a job," says
Ardis, although he is not as
hopeful as ther placement sur-
vey.
"I would guess we are not
going to experience quite the
pain other placement offices are
experiencing," A r d i s says
hopefully, "since our students
are mobile enough to go where
the jobs are."
Another factor in Michigan's.

relative success is that a large
number of its grads continue
ingrad school, possibly 70 per
cent from some departments.
"This year the U-M is the larg-
est producer of med school stu-
dents in the world," Ardis
claims with pride.

(Continsued from rage 1)
parents. According to Morgan,
"they wanted somebody who
wasn't part of the State Depart-
cent for obvious reasons. They
were looking for a lawyer.'
Morgan added that although
Steiner has no law degree he
does teach at the law school,
"and I can't think of anybody
I'd rather trust." under the cir-
cumstances.
Lansing when contacted about
the proposed mission refused to
if
you
see
news
happen
-call
16-DAILY

A Capsule Report by thle
MichiganF'harmaceutical
Association
a5a
'ps
0"
Pinnng dwn fcts boutPharacy act
Pin in 4 fatsabutPharmacy FactsPamc
Pharmacists and consumer groups championed this law which :Facts wiill rxainie anid e.x-
was designed to aid you, the consumer. As a public service, the ; ise ie issues ulircI yi (:i as-
Michigan Pharmaceutical Association presents this information. s isi Vogl as a ituiisttrr of
Q"What's a generic drug? P;t'I ies ilit On i.illiartiacy
Its a drug or medicaiion that is produced by Thle genetric (Ia-nec-ik)
more hdug latu, eiecive Muarcht
moethan one manufacturer, such as penicillin :.iis atpitrilyle
or aspirin. Most often these generic drugs of :MicihIigan Pitarmtiairutial
identical chemical composition are distributed I Asic~ialiititi a rotisuiter
under a multitude ot difterent brand names. : coialit iton. Phlarmttacy as lirst
to, tiiil it as a puicb and
___ What does this law mean to you? : a ti-tlessioitul issue in 1971).
- Ilitte e. sts counttless
IIhr e i a cost difference between "brd : b randi s othe ailte siic-ang tug
nae'rgs. the law permits your pharmacist to :is iitilittit lsc.hitil ii t. s
seetaddispense the '"lower cost, quality }'c i tinflse, iiiiiy saryting
bad'(nless your physician insists on a par- liii elyou canntot kitisw
tiua rnd). Savings trom this service by your ill oi I le rla ilitifertit
phrait are passed on to you. lIi 'tis and tutlaifaturir
"ol-meichia tis - and in
O Does this mean you will NOT get the ; tititi>essc-nitet' tait 'tiiu
,," ;do~ilt--tnt- ie tatryintg
medicine your doctor prescribes? ;1pictes tallthle ttecapruiuc
/') i ta. This, is your
C" f N. Te law still requires the pharmacist to dis- pht lime istit tile.
pneonly a qual ity medication as prescribed. Nowii' y rittiiaimraeist's spe
Youtgt the prescription your doctor specities. ;ii it kiiotnlre ge can wiork lr
*You in stelectinig tine rxac~t
"cirt ig it est t lrd rud, for i/ie
Q"Will all prescriptions be cheaper? ifirt ifl ittleitqutality braid
~( Not always._Many prescription drugs are onlyip tl
G made by one manufacturer, and the pharmacist ; Future issues &r Topics
1 " has no control over the manutacturer's price. EFuttrie Pharmacy Facts-
editionts wsiil deal with othe-r
fl*Do'brand'drugs and generic drugs look alike?: tics wi cha are very y o r
K : tart to you. MI'fA asks your
hiel - itc yous hrvei -etnsi
in. pperance may be noted. Your pharmacist * 1'he state assresiationr, mork-
'aa witcusel you eccordingly. The best pharmacy "drig in cooperatioin with fbc-
J > taeibased on communications, contidence lit And regioneals, has coos-
an oplete intormation about your medicer- "tuittees to ainisser your qtes-
"Send tlsat question to,:
How here's fhow to takce advantage of lis law. PAnt, 11112 in rhigei N -
Consult your pharmacist who is most qualified to malea rational Them tiMlCst
'drug product selection" decisions for you.
And remember, continued "shopping around" when it comes to FIk Ac avatage of the
preacciption services can be hazardous to your health. "eect a4:nosi readily accessible
'lull seicePharmacy .. its the best investment in your good nirsmi e'i 'tof the health care
health. .tearei neyourpharmacist.
"A /i/ai-macy is rel diy avail'a-
Asa arff I' ACrsIst...fo e p in /'/r lein al mtsevrery city,.aend
usually oeneemore hours thee
tray aier- nea by facility. dAd -
hard to be/ievse is thin d ay and
ag 'e01 aicfi/iit evies-
many sillI eakre house calls ini
'f/ce.1/ormoitf realiseeldiveries
an/remergency presrphio,*
*dehict iits amy hoer, day er
nrig/i/

comsment, terming it "highly
political' and "dynamic."
THE GUERRILLAS as still
holding Carire Jane Hunter, 21,
and Kenneth Smith, 22, both
students at Stanford University
and Emilie Van Bergman of the
Netherlands.
They have threatened to kill
the hostages if the demands for
$5000001 ransom, guns, ammu-
nition and the release of guer-
rilla leaders held in Tanzania
are not met by mid-July.
A LATE STARTER
GREENSBORO, N. C. t
Boh Avellini of New Hyde
Park, N.Y., paced football play-
ers in the Atlantic Coast Con-
ference in 1974 in total offense
with 1,689 yards. He averaged
7.4 yards per play and didn't
become a starter for the Mary-
land team until the season's
third game. Avellini gained
most of his yardage by com-
pleting 112 of 189 forward
passes.
North Carolina's Stn Fritt
led the league in rushing while
Jimmy Jerome of North Caro-
lina paced receivers. Roland
Hooks of North Carolina State
led scorers with 82 point.
Sun.-Sun. ort 1-3-5-7-9 p m.
Open at 12:45
Tues ot 7 & 9 .m. ony
Open at 6:45
MONDAY is a
GUEST NIGHT!
Yeu and a ques-only $2.0
Sentenced to 21 ears in
prison fr a crime he nee
committed. Only twa thins
can et him ut. A lot oi
money and Chrles Bronson
> 1 1I \.
HURRY!
ENDS SOON!
Sat-Sun-Wed. at
1-2-5-7-9 .m.
Mn-Tues. at 7 & 9 p.m. Only
MONDAY is a
GUEST NIGHT!
You and a ques--onv $2.50
CHILD UINDER A LEAF
is an absorbitsg experieice
that had people arouind mse
treepitug aloud"'
DYAN CNNON
CIIJLD UNDER
b 1EAF
AM PH C,HIPANHILb.
A PndtiaraPat'tt.ain mrium s' Hc
SEtPrcmeatibCtit.A'it'ii'itltti4iS' ft/
COMING SOON!

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