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May 30, 1975 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-05-30

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Friday, May 30, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Frda, My3,17 TEMCIA.AIYPg ee

State Senate passes Sorry, says judge, but that
consumer protection ain't no way to pay a bill
ST. PAUL, Minn. (P) - A out in trade." He suggested she he could not give full fait
...gin judge has ruled that a woman engage in sexual intercourse the defendant's assertion"
who paid a bill for electrical which, the judge said, "she the whole deal was to bew
urk by Pn ins in spyiml in- d r~p to di nd which t h e nit with one exnerience

h to
"that
sped
with

LANSING (UPI) - The state
Senate has approved a sweep-
ing consumer protection bill
aimed at putting a halt to de-
ceptive trade practices which
cost consumers millions of dol-
lars a year.
On a historic 23-8 vote yester-
day, the upper chamber adopted
a compromise version of the
long-sought measure and sent
it to the House where it faced
a major rewrite. The House is
expected to strengthen the bill
by restoring provisions deleted
in Senate committee.
THE AUTHORITY empower-
ed to dispense up to $12 million
a year in low-interest loans to
an estimated 10,000 needy col-
lege students. That measure
passed on a 30-2 vote.
The consumer protection bill
specifically outlaws 26 trade
practices including advertising
goods or services without intent
to sell them as advertised, mak-
ing false statements about price
reductions, saying repair serv-
ices are needed when they are
not and others.
It also would give the attor-
ney general and all 83 county
prosecutorsbroad powers to use
injunctions to halt deceptive
practices, to seek subpoenas to
obtain merchants' business re-
cords and to file class action
suits.
THE MEASURE, in several
different versions, has been
pending before the legislature
for nine years. Although the
House approved it twice, the
Senate Judiciary Committee
killed it on both occasions.
The Senate Judiciary Com-
mittee this year adopted a
series of weakening amend-

ments that have been assailed
by consumner groups and Attor-
ney General Frank Kelley.
The measure does not apply
to banks, savings and loans,
credit unions, insurance com-
panies, utilties or franchise
firms such as fast food estab-
lishments. These industries
sought exemptions, saying
their trade practices already
are regulated by other state and
federal agencies. Opponents of
the measure said it would un-
leash the attorney general and
prosecuting attorneys on hon-
est merchants unaccustomed to
time-consuming and costly legal
practices.
BUT SEN. Thomas Guastello,
(D-Sterling Heights), the bill's
sponsor, said it was needed to
put a halt to swindles and
schemes which are costing con-
sumers "millions of dollars a
year."
"t'm confident that this is a
bill that business can live
with," Guastello said.
The legislation, which would
take effect Jan. 1, 1976, permits
duped consumers to bring court
action to recover the actual
damages.
GETS A TOP RATING
SARATOGA SPRINGS, N. Y.
(P) - Saratoga Raceway has
been officially declared the
fastest half-mile harness racing
track in North America. The
U. S. Trotting Assn., which as-
signs ratingsbased on average
race times, has set Saratoga's
speed assessment at 2:03.2 for
the mile.
The Spa oval thus moves
ahead of Yonkers, N.Y., race-
way (2:04) and the Delaware,
Ohio, Fairgrounds (2:04.3).

worx y engagin g exal
tercourse still owes $377 be-
cause the arrangement w a s
"performed for the enjoyment
of both parties."
Judge Ronald Hachey of
Ramsey County District Court
ruled on Wednesday in the case
of the amorous installment plan.
COURT PAPERS showed a
suburban contractor agreed to
do electrical work for the wo-
man as a gesture of friendship
to her husband. Upon learning
the couple was divorced, Hach-
ey's memorandum said, the con-
tractor submitted a bill to the
woman for $625. The contractor
suggested the woman "take it

agreeu to uanuWIW liC
parties performed."
The contractor's wife, who
does her husband's bookkeeping,
sent two more bills to the wo-
man but she threw them away.
The lawsuit followed. Hachey
was to decide whether the en-
tire bill, including profit, was
to be paid or a smaller one for
labor and materials.
"Unfortunately, there was no
testimony to help the c o u r t
with respect to the going rate
charged by those engaged in one
of the oldest professions known
to mankind," the judge's me-
morandum said.
THE JUDGE concluded that

sex." He decided that the
agreement was to do the work
at cost "and that the extracur-
ricular activity, if any, was a
side issue to be performed for
the enjoyment of both narties
and not necessarily for hire."
Hachey said the defendant,
by appearing in court dressed
in overalls and a man's ,hirt,
"made little or no attempt to
convince the court of the value
of her personal services if they
were to be considered part of
the evidence." Hachey said the
woman's garb "covered her to
such an extent that her assets,
if any, were substantially hid-
den."

-DOUBLE
FEATURE-
MIKE NICHOL'S 1971
CARNAL KNOWLEDGE
Mike Nichol's great film with screenplay by satirist Jules Feiffer-a wither-
ing look at America's sexual mores. Starring Jack Nicholson, Art Garfunkel,
Candice Bergen, Ann-Margaret.
In MLB 3 at 7 & 9 p.m.
WAIT UNTIL DARK dir. T 1ER6ENCE 17
dr.TRNEYOUNG
Audrey Hepburn, Alan Arkin, and Efrem Zimbalist Jr. in a skillfully exe-
cuted thriller about a blind housewife terrorized by criminals who believe
she is hiding a musical doll stuffed with heroin. Electrifying!
In MLB 4 at 7:15 & 9:15
TONIGHT-in the MOD. LANG. BLDG. $1.25

Oyster Bar &
The Spaghetti Machine
Tuesday thru Sunday-5 to 10 p.m.
301 WEST HURON 663-2403 ANN ARBOR
MENU
Fresh Blue Point oysters on half shell . . 1.95
Dinners below include salad bar, bread, butter, coffee
Spagletti:
1. Tomato ..:...... 2.70 7. Meat Balls ...... 2.95
2. Mushrooms ...... 2.75 8. Sicilian ......... 3.25
3. Meat ............2.95 9. Marinara . 3.25
4. Meat & Mushrooms 2.95 10. Carabonara .. 3.75
5. \Nhite Clam ...... 2.95 11. Butter, Garlic, Basil 2.75
6. Red Clam . ..... 3.25 12. Chicken Livers 3.75
13. Potpuri (Meat, Tomato, Clam Sicilian) ... 3.25
Veal :
Marsala ............3.25 Francaise...........3.25
Noodles :
Green .............3.50 Whole Wheat . 3.50
Daily Specials of Shrimp,
Lobster, Veal, Crabmeat
All spaghetti for children under 10 .... 1.25 less
Dessert :
Cannolii .. . . 75 cents
All noodles are made right in front of your eyes
by our unique "spaghetti machine"
Cocklils-Wite-Beer

L~Jo

I

J.,

DOS SANTOS' 1971
HOWw TASTY WAS MY
LITTLE FRENCHMAN
A Brazilian black comedy about a French trader who is caought by
Brazilian Indians in the 16th century and sentenced to be eaten on the
18th moon. An Ann Arbor premiere. Short: CLOSED MONDAYS-1974
Academy Award tor best animation.

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