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August 04, 1978 - Image 12

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-08-04

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Page 12-Friday, August 4, 1978--The Michigan Daily
Hopefuls seek Bursley's seat

By MICHAEL ARKUSH
This summer's race for the 18th
district State Senate seat features
seven candidates who sport completely-
different campaign styles.
Some of the hopefuls have waged
flashy and expensive advertising
schemes while others have kept a low
profile, relying on wide name
recognition to garner support at the
polls.
THE REPUBLICAN and Democratic
primaries, scheduled for August 8, are
expected to be close political battles, in
which each of the candidates has a
reasonable chance for success. a
All of the candidates vying to replace
retiring Sen. Gilbert Bursley have
focused mainly on the tax reform
amendments and proposals to curb
unemployment.
While the candidates recognize the
important of the state's tax crisis, they
disagree on which of the two tax reform
proposals, Tisch or Headlee, will more
effectively benefit citizens.
Some of them even oppose both
amendments and have developed their
own programs to cure the state's tax
ills.
Pieree
Dr. Ed Pierce, the Democratic loser
of Congressional contests in 1974 and
1976, is running a very low-key cam-
paign-a complete turnaround from his
last two races. He believes, however,
that his name and policies are so widely
known in Washtenaw County that vic-
tory next Tuesday is almost certain.
"People know who Ed Pierce is and
what he stands for," said the 48-year-
old candidate.
PIERCE SAID many state-run
programs are very inefficient and must
be cut immediately from the state
budget.
"There has got to be some
mechanism to get rid of all the incom-
petency (sic) in the state
bureaucracy," he said.
Pierce said he opposed both tax
amendments, but believes the state
should institute a graduate income tax.
The late, late show
is here, til 1 am
tonight
BILLIARDS,
PINBALL, and
BOWLING
at the UNION

Seven split on tax
reform propositions

The 40-year-old Republican said his
experience in city government has
prepared him well for the state
legislature.
"We have to deal every week with the
state legislature and I think I have a
fundamental knowledge about state
government I believe I know more

He claims it would be more equitable
and would avoid a deep cut in state ser-
vices which he said would be the
probable consequence of the Tisch
proposal.
"BY CUTTING ineffective programs
gradually, we can cut the amount of
total spending in Lansing. But unlike
California, this state does not have a $5
million surplus," he said. ,
Pierce said he fears people are
rapidly losing faith in the state gover-
nment. He said he believes it must be
restored, or the democratic system
may soon collapse.
Goodman
George Goodman, Democratic
Mayor of Ypsilanti, agrees with Pierce
that leadership is sorely lacking in Lan-
sing and said he feels his experience in
city government will allow him to
restore public trust.
GOODMAN, 37, also opposes both tax
reform proposals and thinks the
legislature should revise the property
assessment program.
"I believe a ceiling on property tax
could encourage more economic ex-
pansion and improve the tax struc-
ture," he said. He did not specify the
type of revisions he could support.
Contrary to Pierce, the Ypsilanti
mayor has had to operate a much more
vigorous and wide open campaign. He
has worked since early May to establish
the name recognition which the Ann
Arbor doctor has achieved.
GOODMAN REGARDS the environ-
ment as one of the state's serious
crises. He said he believes the waters"
need to be improved and cleansed.
"I have worked before to improve the
environment and I think too many
people brush it off as just a minor
problem," he said.
Goodman opposes the legislature's
seniority system whereby committee
chairmanships are given to represen-
tatives with the most years in office.
"I WANT THE best quality people to
get the leadership of the important
committees. If Iam elected to Lansing,
I will try to change the committee
structure," said the Ypsilanti mayor.
Moon
Democrat Harold Moon, a 46-year-old
bail bondsman, has announced that he

wil not accept any campaign con- about it than any of the other can-
tributions. Moon, who made an unsuc- didates," he said.
cessful bid for the office in 1974, said he Trowbridge argues the Tisch amen-
does not "want to owe anything to dment would only transfer citizens'
anybody. burden of property taxes to the in-
"I'm trying to show people how Ido creases in income taxes.
things. I prove by my actions and not by "The Headlee amendment is a good
my written words what my abilities measure because there is no reason
are," said Moon. that government spending should ex-
Moon said he believes that those ceed what people can pay," said
seeking a divorce should pay a Trowbridge
specified fee to fund court proceedings.
He argues that lawyers are not serving
citizens because they demand such high
fees. Jerry Klein, president of the Ann
It is about time that people started Arbor Board of Realtors, said he
getting a fair deal with the law," he believes he knows the attitudes of the
said, citizens better than any of the other
MOON IS THE only candidate who candidates.
strongly supports capital punishment. "I've been a salesman all my life and
He says he has seen studies whichshow I think that's what you have to do in
capital punishment acts as a deterrent politics. I've knocked on the doors of so
to potential hard criminals. many of this county's voters and I know
"If somebody murders somebody what they want," said Klein.
else, then he should pay his obligation Klein, a 43-year-old Republican, said
to society. He had received a warning he favors the Headlee plan but opposes
(possible execution) and he did not the Tisch proposal. He strongly suppor-
abide by it," said the bail bondsman. ts a tax break to encourage new
Moon complains that government businesses to settle in the area.
continues to grow rapidly, said he The real estate broker said he
would propose legislation requiring believes government is too big. He said
citizen approval before any tax in- he would attempt to reduce its role and
creases could be levied. He said he does stimulate free enterprise.
not support either tax proposal as they
stand, but he could favor Tisch's if it
was revised to freeze taxes at a later
date. Stimpson
o rMichael Stimpson, a 30-year-old
Republican also said he thinks he
knows the moods of the county's
William Colburn, a 39-year-old residents.
Republican, insists he is "different" Stimpson, who is a budget analyst for
from the rest of the candidates. Washtenew County, said his experience
Colburn, who is a University with the budget will make it easier for
associate professor, said he wants to him to "tackle big financial problems in
develop a program to improve citizen Lansing."
involvement in the state government. Stimpson opposes the Tisch amen-
"I would like to let anyone who wants dment but favors the Headlee plan. He
to, come up to Lansing and sit on the said he would like to freeze the current
Senate floor with me. I think too many level of taxes.
people don't know what is going on in
their government,"hensaid.
Colburn, a former Ann Arbor City
Councilman and Mayor Pro Tem, said
he detests the state's unemployment
com pensation laws which he said grant a efs n i m d,
funds to anyone who is unemployed.
Colburn insists the compensation
should only be given to those forcibly
removed from their jobs.
"Twenty-two per cent of the unem- O NI
ployment compensation goes to volun-
tary quitters, money which could be h
saved for other uses," he said.
He opposes both tax reform amen-
dments, maintaining there are serious b u s
problems with each one.
"We don't have enough of a surplus to But as a volunteer
support Tisch's proposal and I think the you'll get to help America
Headlee amendment would limit the stand a little taller. And you'll
growth of the state's economy," said stand a little taller yourself.
Colburn. America needs your help or
we wouldn't be asking Your
Trowbridge community needs your help.
People 18 or 80: we don't care
City Councilman Ronald Trowbridge as long as you do. VISTA is
(R-Fourth Ward), a strong advocate of coming alive again. Come alive
free enterprise, said the economic with us. VISTA. Call toll free:
climate in Michigan needs to be 800-424-8580,UC
stimulated. He said his first priority W
would be to create more jobs and to A s
r vise t e unemployment compen

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