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August 02, 1978 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-08-02

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The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, August 2, 1978-Page 3
TISCH, HEADL E E, FERENCY MEET

ta
He
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al
on
by
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tin
Fi
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Tax reform proposals debated
WARREN - There are three kinds of proposal, taxes could only be increased missioner, stated.
x proposals in Michigan this year: the same period. by a recommendation from the gover- "I think we ought to ha
eadlee tax limitation amendment, the HEADLEE explained that his nor, two-thirds passage by the state between the people becausc
sch property tax cut amendment, and proposal would limit the amount by legislature, or voter approval. a belly-full of politicians," h
plan for progressive tax reform based which taxes could be raised. He Headlee was quick to point out that Zolton Ferency deliver
a graduated tax structure called for stressed that in the last ten years per- his proposal covers all forms of winded attack onthe federal
Zolton Ferency, Democratic guber- sonal income tax has increased 730 per taxation. before addressing the issu
torial candidate. cent and his amendment would limit THE TISCH amendment, on the other state tax reform. Ferency
The three met head-on for the first the increase in any given year to the hand, would cut property taxes by 50 pointing out that he agrees
me last night in a debate at Warren's percentage that personal income in- per cent. Property taxes are currently Tisch and Headlee on two m
tzgerald High School. Richard creases. assessed at 50 per cent of estimated "Michigan taxpayers are
eadlee, chairman of Taxpayers "The average American works 42 per market value. they have a right to be."
nited, spoke first, and let a polished cent of the time, that is 42 per cent of "People's money ought to be working agrees with the other
de show present his case. He stressed every dollar goes to taxes. Clearly for them and not people working for something ought to be don
at growth in state spending has in- government is out of control," Headlee their money," Tisch, a drain com- See FERENCY, Pa
' _- .. . frlri ho la~nuuexin 0 of O uiiusuy.,irom

ye dialogue
e we'vc had
e added.
ed a long-
J tax system
ie at hand:
y began by
d with both
ajor points.
irate" and
He said he
two that
e about the

creased 235 per cent in the last ten
years, while personal income has in-
creased a mere 104 per cent over the

togd the audience of 250, mostly fro
this working class Detroit suburb.
He further explained that under his

Housing Office to run
Mediation Service

By R. J. SMITH
The University's Mediation Service,
which has helped students settle
disputes with off-campus landlords and
tenants for over 15 years, has been shif-
ted from the Office of Student Services
to the Housing Office. The move
became official July 1 and is designed
to save the University money and in-
crease the availability of aid to studen-
ts.
The mediator service aids students in
a variety of disputes with tenants and
landlords. By conferring with both
sides in a dispute, the service has
solved problems with damage deposits,
lease clarity, maintenance, non-
payment of rent and noisy tenants.
"WE KEEP those kind of disputes out
of the courts," explained John Finn,
director of housing information.
Although in the past students having
problems with University housing of-
ficials have occasionally been helped
by the service, that will no longer hap-
pen now that the service has been in-
corporated into the Housing Office.
r- toda

"We can't have us (the Housing Of-
fice) mediating disputes between the
tenants and the people above us," ex-
plained Finn.
THE MEDIATION service is staffed
by two or three people during the fall
and winter terms, although right now
Director Elizabeth Leslie is the only
worker. The service aids about 2,000
students and settles close to 750 cases
annually.
Each year the staff also assists
students -in about 500 "over-the-
counter" cases, which do not involve
any mediation.
"We handle everything, including a
lot of things like people dropping can
openers in their garbage disposals,"
added Finn.
BECAUSE THE service receives
funds directly through the University, it
is able to help all students who ask for
aid, Leslie said. She added that the ser-
vice "has never been where it should
be" in terms of budget size.
According to Director of Off-Campus
See HOUSING, Page 14

Sign of the times
Coyle Hudson, a Detroit sanitation worker, stands a picket line in front of idle gar-
bage trucks in downtown Detroit yesterday after workers staged a wildcat strike
when negotiations over forced overtime broke down. Bus mechanics and election
workers joined the walkout.

Happenings-...
... are sparse on this first Wednesday of the
month. Start at noon with the weekly brown bag
picnic on the lawn at the Wesley Foundation, 602 E.
Huron ... or be introduced to Transcendental
Meditation by the Student's International
Meditation Society at noon or at 8 in 4111 Michigan
Union ... take the rest of the afternoon off before
attending a 7:30 discussion of Asian-American
problems led by Dr. William Liu, director of the
Asian-American Mental Health Research Center in
Chicago. The meeting will be held in the Pendleton
Room of the Union.
Bare-ing down on cootchy-cootchy
Alice Hinton charges that she is being unwillingly
taught the birds and the bees every time she steps out
on her veranda. Hinton, from Healdsburg, California,
said nude bathers at the city's Fitch MountainlBeach of-
ten engage in public sex acts. "It's like Sodom and
Gomorrah in Sonoma County. It's not just copulation.
We see oral sex, too. On Broadway in San Francisco,
You pay admission to see these things. That's your
choice. ButIwhenwalkoutonmy deck, Ihavetoseeit.
I don't have a choice." Some of the activity has oc-
curred on land belonging to Fred MacMurray, who
raises cattle on his ranch and uses it for vacations.
Althgugh thereispresently.a state law against illegal

exposure, it does not define exactly what is indecent.
One pornography writer said his canoe trips down the
river have provided him with the raw material for his
new book.
Lady in the Sky with wrinkles
If you happen to be pulling the weeds or trimming
the bushes and a little old lady suddenly drops in on
you it's probably not your fairy godmother, but
more likely Ardath Evitt. The 74-year-old resident
of Paris, Illinois will be making her first parachute
jump Sunday. "Four years ago when I was driving
home after cooking at the grade school, I looked up
in the shy and saw three parachutists. They were
floating down, so easily, so beautifully. That's for
me, I thought, and I've had a bee in my bonnet ever
since." Though two parachute-jumping schools
turned her down because of her age, she found a
third school which accepted her, teaching her to
fall, and how to handle emergencies. Rumor has it
that Evitt is negotiating with CBS to be the stunt
woman for Grandma Walton.

eight hours. "I was upside down screaming for help
but no one heard," Griffin said. Early Monday mor-
ning a neighbor heard Griffin's screaming and spot-
ted her feet and ankles sticking out of the hole.
Police later remover her from the pit. Griffin suf-
fered minor injury, and the dog was unharmed. A
lady who had been involved in a similar accident
last year reported the incident to be a "very deep
experience."
A sound investment
The family of Jerry Carver better learn to swim
in key. The inhabitants of Davis, California recently
bought a swimming pool in the shape of a violin. The
75-foot-longconcrete pool, copied from a violin in
Mrs. Carver's collection, fits well in the long,
narrow backyard which couldn't accommodate a
traditional-shaped pool. One neighbor said the new
addition may mean friends will forever be stringing
along with the Carvers.

2

*On the outside . .
Stuck in a rut Pull the shades and go back to sleep. It will be
Hattie Griffin sank to a personal low Sunday mostly cloudy today with a high in the mid 80s.
night. The 58-year-old Chicago resident, trying to Later on those clouds will rumble and flash as they
rescue her puppy, dove head-firstito aWfite-foot pour showers upon us. The low tonight will be in the
hole where both she and her dog were stuck for

Md

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