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July 28, 1978 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-07-28

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Page 8-Friday, July 28, 1978-The Michigan Daily
RANK-AND-FILE MUST NOW VOTE

A WA
tatives
ted a p
left it t
whethe
head of
Natit
Postal'
remain
ship w
cord di

Postal officials reject contract
SHINGTON (AP) - Represen- and retain a guarantee against layoffs. inadequate and that work rules remain to 9 to let Andrews send the pa
of 280,000 postal workers rejec- too rigid, such as mandatory overtime. rank-and-file.
roposed contract yesterday, but POSTAL workers in New Jersey and Andrews estimated that the contract However, one committeer
up to the rank-and-file to decide California staged illegal walkouts in would increase the average wage $3,100 John Richards, president of
r to accept the settlement and protest after the settlement wasforged over three years. About half of that tsburgh area local, charged
ff the possibility of a mail strike. last Friday, but most of the workers would derive from cost-of-living boosts. committee's second vote viol
onal officials of the American have returned. The average annual wage now is almost union's constitution. He threa
Workers Union (APWU) said they Some union locals rejected the con- $16,000 seek a federal court injunction
ed optimistic that the member- tract in informal votes. The New York $FTER eek Andrews from sending the ctont
ould approve the three-year ac- Area Postal Union, the nation's largest AFTERdVOTING to reject the con- tAndrewsifromtsendingrtheycond
esnite the 29-15 rejection vote hy and most militant local, has scheduled tract, the advisory committee voted 30 th -ied

ct to the
member,
the Pit-
that the
ated the
tened to
to block
ract into

the union's national bargaining ad-
visory committee.
BUT THE leaders of some locals said
the committee's vote would influence
some members to vote against the con-
tract. Ballots will be mailed, probably
within a week.
The 2-1 margin of the committee's
vote came as a surprise to APWU
President Emmet Andrews, who had
said the committee's sentiment was
running "50-50."
The contract would providea 19.5 per '
cent wage increase - including cost-of-
living adjustments - over three years

a strike vote for next Monday, and
some other locals have indicated they
would follow the New York local's
decision.
Postal strikes are prohibited by
federal law, which calls for fines and
jail terms for violators. But in 1970,the
New York local led a walkout that
spread to 200,000 workers across the
country.
THOSE strikers were not punished.
This time, the Postal Service vows to
enforce the law.
Those objecting to the proposed con-
tract say that the wage increase is

Wine oods, and smoke
subject of private library
(Continued fromPage3)
her life now, Longone admits "I wasn't friends and business acquaintances.
a very good cook when I was married." "When a town is an active food and
She said her "eyes were opened up" to wine town, you learn from people
the joys of cooking when she began around you," explained Longone, ad-
scrutinizing cookbooks for traditional ding Ann Arbor seems to breed good
American recipes to please some cooks.
visiting foreign friends.
An interest in food and wine is in- A CHAMPION of the "rebellion"
stilled in many gastronomists from against junk food, Longone said many
childhood, Longone theorizes. Happy of today's undiscriminating eaters
times, such as holidays, are always ac- "really have their values all wrong -
companied by a large family feast. But quality no longer counts." Her own
even those who are not exposed to theory for cooking is "use the freshest
culinary pleasures at an early age can ingredients, cook it with love and use
easily become food enthusiasts while your imagination."
traveling, she said. Since World War II, Also denouncing the space-age con-
when European culture began to in- cept of "breakfast bars" and eat-and-
fluence the United States more than run meals, Longone said she likes to
ever before, a worldwide array of vic- relax at mealtime and think about the
tuals has entered American kitchens. history of what she is eating, thereby
Also, novice cooks gain practice when making meals a "rich experience."
they are expected to make dinners for Longone devotes much of her time to
gasroom .4-sue mnang cue situ c

SECN D WEEK
Sat-Sun-Wed 1:30-3:30-5:30-7:30-9:30
Mon-Tues-Thurs-Fri 7:30-9:30

i
r
r
T

L1L U of N F pAN1 HER

Mon-Tues-Thurs-Fri 7:30-9:45
Sat-Sun-Wed 1:15-3:20-5:30-7:35-9:50

HUMPHREY BOGART in
The Maltese Falcon
1941
Bogart as Dashiell Hammett's hard-
boiled cynical Sam Spade adds new
dicnrnsions to the detective genre
in John Huston's directioral debut.
With MARY ASTOR, SYDNEY GREEN-
STREET, and PETER LORRE. Twelve
stars, at least.
Sat: Wertmuller's
SEVEN BEAUTIES
Cinema Guild
TONIGHT at 7:30 & 9:30
.OLD ARCH AUD
$1.50

gastronomy. Besides managing the sno
and teaching classes, she hosts a radio
program on WUOM called "Adventures
in Gastronomy," which she said has at-
tracted many new clients.
The Wine and Food Library's wares
are available to purchasers "by mail or
appointment only." Longone issues
about two catalogues a year, and if a
customer's request is not in the shop,
she will conduct a worldwide search for
the elusive volume.
"Finding books is the most difficult
thing," Longone said, explaining she is
led on quite a few "wild goose chases"
while searching for additions to her
collection.
Of her clientele, Longone said, "It is
not a large, large number, but it's
enough to keep me busy - It's always
changing."

STARTS TODAY
Mon-Tues-Thurs-Fri 7:30-9:45
Sat-Sun-Wed 1:30-3:30-5:30-7:30-9:45

The Ann Arbor Film Cooperstive
presents at MLB 3
FRIDAY, JULY 28
MONKEY BUSINESS
(Howard Hawks, 1952) 7 only-MLB 3
A monkey owned by research chemist CARY GRANT accidentally concocts
the elixir of youth, allowing Grant and company to throw age to the winds.
Admirably scripted by Ben Hecht, I.A.L. Diamond, and Charles Lederer,
uproariously funny comedy by veteran Hawks who manages to combine
some sharp insight into the contemporary mania for youth with outrageous
slapstick. With GINGER ROGERS and a memorable MARILYN MONROE. Plus
Short: SAMBI MEETS GODZILLA (Marv Newland, 1969) A spoof on film
credits.
I WAS A MALE WAR BRIDE
(Howard Hawks, 1949) 9 only-MLB3
One of Hawks' and Grant's funniest movies-so funny, in fact, that co-star
Ann Sheridan had trouble keeping a straight face herself.-After victory in
Europe, a French soldier (Grant) in love with a WAC (Sheridan) is denied
entrance to the United States. However, all brides of soldiers are allowed
in, so, amid hilarious circumstances (including a memorable drag scene),

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