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July 21, 1978 - Image 7

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-07-21

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, July 21, 1978-Page 7

Harvard
(Continued from Page 34
student's political views, financial
situation and social habits. Records
were typically kept without the
student's knowledge or consent.
These CIA files were often retained
by the agency whether or not the
student was approached with a job of-
fer. Foreign students are known to be
frequent subjects of CIA covert
recruiting. And the information on the
student has often been used to pressure
the individual into spying for the CIA on
his countrymen both in the U.S. and at
home.
A SET OF guidelines for relations
between the University of Michigan and
U.S. intelligence agencies will be
proposed at the September faculty
Senate Assembly meeting.
Boksupported the prohibition of such
covert recruitment in the Harvard
guidelines by citing the need for "trust
and candor to promote the free and
open exchange of ideas and information
essential to inquiry and learning."
The prohibition on "participation and

pres. criticizes CIA activities
operational activities of intelligence chance to set its own rules. However, he T HE THIlRD wit
agencies" refers to the publicized criticized the proposed charter for not Abrams, testifying in
policy by the CIA of encouraging banning covert recruitment and also chairman of the State
,professors doing research abroad to recommended that "intelligence agen- on Academic Freedom
provide the CIA with sensitive infor- cies be prohibited from using as sour- sity of California, sup
mation. In addition, some professors ces of operational assistance in foreign witnesses advocating<
have had contracts, unknown to their - countries, all academics travelling relationships.
colleges or sometimes to the ad- abroad." But, Abrams, whos
ministration, with the CIA In which He supported this complete ban by recently completed a s
they used their academic cover to ob- arguing the need to remove any reason between California an
tain particular information desired by for suspicion among foreign gover- ce agencies, sugge
the intelligence agency. nments that an American professor is cultivate academic re
THE HARVARD president was motivated by reason other than his "freely open basis."
-highly critical of the CIA's attitude that purely professional interest.
it did.not have to abide by Harvard's
rules. He argued that "the CIA is har- -
dly the appropriate arbiter to weigh
(national security) needs against the DAILY EARLY BIRD MATINEES - Adults $1.25
legitimate concerns of academic DISCOUNT IS FOR SHOWS STARTING BEFORE 1:3C
freedom." MON. thru SAT. 10 A.M. ti 1:311 P.M. SUN. & HOLS.12}_Moon ti
Also giving testimony was Morton
Baratz, former General Secretary of EVENING ADMISSIONS AFTER 5:00, $3.50 ADULTS
the American Association of University Monday-Saturday 1:30-5:00, Admission $2.50 Adult and
Professors and now vice chancellor for Sundays and Holidays 1:30 to Close, $3.50 Adults, $2.54
academic affairs at the University of Sunday-Thursday Evenings Student & Senior Citizen Di
Baratz stressed the importance of Children 12 And Under, Admissions $1.25
guidelines in giving each university the

ness, Richard
his capacity as
wide Committee
for the Univer-
ported the other
an end to covert
e committee has
tudy of relations
d U.S. intelligen-
sted the CIA
lationships on a

0
it 1;30 P.M.
rs
d Students
0 Students
liscounts

DAILY EARLY BIRD MATINEES -- Adults $1.25
DISCOUNT IS FOR SHOWS STARTING BEFORE 1:30
MON. thrOu SAT. 10 A.M. tul 1:36P.M. SUN. & HOLS.12 Noon til 1;30 P.M.
EVENING ADMISSIONS AFTER 5:00, $3.50 ADULTS
Monday-Saturday 1:30-5:00, Admission $2.50 Adult and Students
Sundays and Holidays 1:30 to Close, $3.50 Adults, $2.50 Students
Sunday-Thursday Evenings Student & Senior Citizen Discounts
Children 12 And Under, Admissions $1.25
TICKET SALES
1. Tickets sold no sooner than 30 minutes
prior to showtigne.
2. No tickets sold later than 15 minutes
after showtime.

TICKET SALES
1. Tickets sold no sooner than 30 minutes
prior to showtipne.
2. No tickets sold later than 15 minutes
after showtime.
10:30
1:00
3:30
JOHN TRAVOLTA 6:30
OLIVIA NEWTON-JOHN 9:00
,Gi

STARRIN
GOLDIE HAN
CHEVY CHASE

10:40
1:15
3:45
7:00
9:30

10:15
12:45
4:15
7:15
9:45

W~ho
Neil Simon's
"THE CHEA.

6.A
9:

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