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July 11, 1978 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-07-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Two crime
prevention
proposals
unveiled
,By R. J. SMITH
With Wire Reports
A pair of announcements handed
down in Washington yesterday may
have sizable impact soon on the ways
crime is battled on the streets of Ann
Arbor and surrounding areas.
In an early-morning briefing, White
House domestic policy aide Stuart
Eizenstat unveiled plans for a massive
restructuring of the Law Enforcement
Assistance Administration (LEAA).
LEAA is responsible for giving
criminal justice grants to states, which
then allocate the money to various
cities, townships and counties.
LATER YESTERDAY morning,
President Carter echoed Eizenstat's
declaration, and spoke of a plan to
allocate over $200 million of already-
existing federal funds to 50 or 60 of the
nation's most crime-infested public
housing projects. "Instead of blasting
them down, we're trying to renovate
some of them," said one spokesman
from the Department of Housing and
Urban Development (HUD).
The proposals were immediately en-
dorsed by key members of Congress.
Carter has long been a foe of LEAA,
promising changes when he was cam-
See CARTER, Page 11

Ride 'em cowbo !
Our podner here looks downright frustrated after his trusty steed has decided to take a rest. The monkey and dog are part
of a rodeo clown act appearing at the Calgary Stampede in Canada this past week.

Vandals paint racial slurs at Trotter House

-AM-

By MITCH CANTOR
Tensions between inhabitants of the
William Monroe Trotter House and
members of the Phi Delta Theta frater-
nity next door are said to be the cause of
racial slurs which were spray-painted
on Trotter House property early Sun-
day morning.
Members of both groups claim that
disputes between the fraternity and the
black cultural center probably spurred
someone to paint messages such as
"warning nigger crossing", as well as
swastikas and "KKK" on sidewalks
and garbage cans. The word "nigger"
was also written on the car of one of
four blacks now living in Trotter house..
r-today

BEULAH SANDERS, director of
Trotter House, said she didn't know
who was responsible for the vandalism,
but said, "I have an idea," adding that
she felt the people in the fraternity may
have something to do with it.
Sanders said racial friction between
the two houses has taken the form of
several verbal assaults by members of
Phi Delta Theta in early morning
hours. "You know, they yell nigger,
things like that," she said.
Though Myke Buck, summer
manager of the Phi Delta Theta house,
could not account for the vandalism,
one of the other fraternity brothers said
his "friends might have done it." The
stgdent, who asked not to be identified,
said the major problem between the

two houses stems from the large num-
ber of non-students who attend Trotter
House parties.
"THE MAIN thing that we're pissed
off about is that the people who come
there (Trotter House) aren't University
students." The student added that
guests at Trotter House parties often
park illegally in the street and in the
Phi Delta Theta parking lot.
Buck and one of the guests from such
a party began fighting last spring shor-
tly after Buck asked the man to move
his car from the Phi Delta Theta
parking lot.
"Our cars have gotten scratched, and
we've had bricks thrown at our house.
We've got to pay for our house out of our

own pockets, and the University takes
care of their (Trotter House's) stuff,"
the student said.
ANOTHER POINT of dispute bet-
ween the two houses centers around Phi
Delta Theta's dalmation.
"I've heard any number of students
tell me that this dog is trained to dislike
black people," Sanders said.
Buck said any problems with the dog
is just coincidental. "Michelob of
Bavaria (the dog) doesn't like blacks,
but he wasn't trained that way."
Sanders said she also felt the recent
Bakke decision, along with the Nazi
march "may have had something to do
with this."
Ann Arbor Police Chief Walter
Krasny said he was not aware of dif-
ficulties between the two groups.

Singing their praises
Here's some news to sing about: The University's
Men's Glee Club captured first place among men's
choirs this weekend in the Llangollen (Wales) In-
ternational Musical Eisteddfod, billed as the
world's largest international musical contest. First
prize was a plaque and 200 English pounds (of
what?). The group is currently performing
throughout Europe.
The story behind the story
Television reporter Jack McCarthy and a ehannel 7
film r wlled into townvesterdav to do a story

He cleverly had his crew filma red toy bus pulled by
a string along the sidewalk on State St. The
cameraman, crouched over and peering at the curb,
attracted a crowd of aout 20 curious onlookers at
noon. Now that's stooping pretty low to get a story.
Happenings ...
... aren't happening today. At least nobody has
bothered t6 tellus about anything. Take the day off.
They've been bugged
Residents of several Maine communities have a
problem that's really bugging them. "Zillions and
zillions" of clinging, crawling beetles bred in deep

driven people from their homes. "It's like an Alfred
Hitchcock movie," said state entomologist Richard
Dearborn. "People are desperate. They're
sweeping out quarts-full of the bugs every night
before they go to bed." What's more, the pesky bugs
have hard shells and don't squash easily. "This has
been a chronic problem for several years, but it only
seems to have reached explosive levels this year,"
said Conservation Commissioner Richard
Barringer.
On the outside.. .
Expect a high of 74 under sunny skies today, but
don't hold your breath. The weather people also told
us we'd have showers last weekend and we saw
nary a dron of rain. They're going to have to work

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