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June 30, 1978 - Image 9

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-06-30

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, June 30,;1978-Page 9
E. Europe moves in on Africa

BERLIN (AP) - Communist East
European countries are joiningthe
Soviet drive for more influence in
Africa and are pouring money,
technology, weapons and military
training into the area, an Associated
Press survey shows.
Some experts say East European
nations are used as surrogates in areas
where the Soviets don't want to become
directly involved.
In other areas of Africa, East
European aid projects seem to stem
from self-interest rather than an at-
tempt to boost Soviet fortunes.
THE SURVEY, on two continents,
found East European involvement in
aid to both Marxist-leaning and non-
Communist countries, and to guerrilla
movements of the Third World.
" East Germany is reported setting
up security police organizations in
Sov iet Su
UNISIA
TUNISIA
LIBYA
NIGERIA
AFR
BENIN
CENT. AFR. EMPIRE
KENYA NIGERIA
ANGO
ZAMBIA, SUDAN, LBYA
EGYPT, ANGOLA
MOfAMBIQUE, BENIN.
ANGOLA, LIBYA
SOUTH YEMEN.
ETIOPIAJ

0

Angola, Mozambique, Benin and South
Yemen and is training glider pilots,
maintaining military vehicles and
providing youth organizations with
"premilitary" training.
" Poland is building a Libyan power
station andhas promised Nigeria some
300 geologists and technicians.
e Czechoslovakia is lending Ethiopia
$46.5 million to modernize and expand a
variety of industries.
* Hungary is loaning Tunisia $35
million mostly for agricultural
development and is exporting whole
factories to "lessen dependence on
former colonial powers. "
" Bulgaria is expanding Mozam-
bique's Limpopo Valley irrigation area
from 75,000 to 785,000 acres and is
building a hydroelectric dam at
Massingir.
Western experts say East Germany
apparently is taking care of Africa's
arr ogat es ?
I . a0WNwI
LIBYA, NIGERIA e
ETHIOPIA, EGYPT, SUDAN
A EG~
SOUT H
YEMEN
SUOAN
ENT, E THIOPIA
ICAN EMPIRE
KENYA
LA
ZAMBIA MOZAMBIQUE
MOZAMBIQUE

badly wounded, just as it once provided
hospital space for wounded North Viet-
namese.
"IF THEY want to keep it a secret,
they should quit taking them on tours of
the Soviet War Memorial," says one
diplomat, who reports that groups of
African amputees and cripples are
being shepherded around East Berlin.
Some Western analysts see strong
signs that staunchly pro-Soviet East
Germany is becoming Russia's main
helper in a long-range move to build in-
fluence in Africa through satellite
surrogates.
There is adequate evidence, one West
German Africa-watcher says, that
Moscow and East Germany are
teaming up "so that East Germany
becomes active in areas where the
Soviets don't want to burn their
fingers."
East Germans provide military aid to
Ethiopia, he said, partly because the
Russians can't do it themselves without
helping defeat at least one Eritrean
rebel movement they once supported.
Ethiopia, with heavy support from
Cuba and the Soviet Union, recently put
down a campaign by ethnic Somali
rebels to seize eastern Ethiopia's
Ogaden region.
ETHIOPIA NOW'is fighting Eritrean
rebels, who have stepped up their 16-
year-old war for independence.
Not all the projects promote the
Soviet Union. Romania has the most in-
dependent foreign policy in the Soviet
bloc and many of its aid projects serve
its own interests.
Yugoslavia, whose Communist
government has been independent sin-
ce it broke with the Soviet Union in 1948,
also aids African countries. It is
reopening Angola's richest iron mine,
closed since the Portuguese left in 1975,
and has loaned Egypt $10 million for
rural electrification.
Yugoslavia also provides arms to
developing nations and is active in of-
ficer training in Libya, Zambia and
Sudan, Western sources said.
WESTERN ANALYSTS agree that
even East German motives in Africa
include a dash of self-interest, including
efforts to counter West German
cultural and political influence.
East Berlin's first African contacts
included rebel movements in Angola
and Mozambique. In both cases, the
rebels took over and now are fighting
anti-government forces themselves.
Bonn sources say East Germany
prints propoganda magazines and other
items for rebels in Rhodesia, South
Africa and South-West Africa.
Some West German watchers of East
Germany discount a report that East
Berlin planned the recent rebel in-

vasion ofZaire's Shaba province. East
Germany's defense minister, Gen.
Heinz Hoffman, was making a high-
level African tour when the invasion
started.
EGYPT AND Sudan have both sent
home Russian advisers in recent years,
but the early 70s, when Soviet aid was
available, was also a time of substan-
tial aid from East Europe. Tpe
Stockholm International Peace
Research Institute says Czechoslovakia
exported $87 million worth of arms in
1970-1976, and 18 per cent went to Egypt
and Sudan.
Yugoslavia, the institute says, sent 70
per cent of its $24 million in arms expor-
ts to Egypt. Another 13 per cent went to
Tanzania.
. African leaders have become
regulars on the East European circuit
of state banquets and factory visits.
IN ROMANIA LAST Monday, Moroc-
can Foreign Affairs Minister M'hamed
Boucetta and Algerian Energy Minister
Sid Ahmed Ghozoli were arriving while
President Nicolae Ceaucescu was
receiving Ivory Coast Foreign Minister
Simeon Ake and a deputy premier was
receiving Gabon education leader Dr.
Julian Mezu.
That same day, Libyan leader Col.
Moammar Khadafy arrived in East
Berlin after an East European swing on
a tour that included Bulgaria,
Czechoslovakia, Hungary and Poland.
Soviet bloc leaders are secretive
about their foreign aid programs. But
they are free with promises like the
recent vow of Czech Premier Lubomir
Strougal: "We will fulfill our inter-
national duty wherever the national
liberation struggle with neocolonialism
and racism is currently being waged to
its conclusion."
GEORGE LUCAS' 1968
THX 1138
The first film by the director of AMER-
ICAN GRAFFITI and STAR WARS, this
is a chilling tale of a man who tries
to rebel in a future society that
lives beneath the surface of the earth
and is dominated by computers. With
Robert Duvall and Donald Pleasance.
Sat: Swept Away
Sun: M (Free at 7:30)
CINEMA GUILD
Tonight at 7:30 & 9:30
Old Arch. Aud.
$1.50

I
C
!
M
r

Hunter still rocking
(Continuedfrom Page5)
some kind of an award. The co- vocals are full and well-arranged, and
ordination between members the music exudes a subtle joy which is
of the band is astonishing, unexpected and delightful.
considering the complexity
of the song and the demand- MANY OF Hunter's songs work
ing shifts in tempo. The within a delicate framework consisting
listener's focus of attention is inten- of hard-rock instrumentation set at a
tionally drawn from Hunter's searingly slower pace than the average Steve
direct vocals to Dennis Elliott's driving Miller pop-schlock. This creates a
drum rhythms and on to equally stab- uniquely modified musical genre which
bing guitar and piano performances. fits somewhere between blasting rock
The group cooks immaculately on what and roll and the typified rock ballad.
is one of Hunter's finest compositions. "Broadway" is just such a song; Hun-
Hunter's talent as a lyricist is most ter etches a tragic portrait of a would-
evident on "To Love A Woman," a be starlet and places it in a musical set-
meaningful tune which closes out side ting which alternates between
two. The music is light and well- hopefulness and moodiness.
tempered, pleasantly accentuating the It's unfortunate that this album is
tender lyric. Although all the band only available as an import, con-
members perform on this tune, the sidering the narrowed audience it will
piano and rhythm guitar are most reach as a result. Ian Hunter is a
striking. The song is atypical of Hunter, classic force in the field of rock music,
although he's certainly performed and Overnight Angels deserves the ap-
beautiful ballads before: the backing preciation of any devoted rocker.

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