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June 16, 1978 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-06-16

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%L

Vol. LXXXVII, No. 32-S
Friday, June 16, 1978
c.se iTwenty Pages
Ann Arbor, Michigan Ten Cents
OUST ED BY SCANDAL
Italy's Leone resigns
T .-_ wak nfta the midp f kidnind fnrm r Premier Aldn

1

ROME (AP)-Giovanni Leone, under fire for alleged tax
evasion and other financial improperties, resigned last
night as president of Italy just hours after the powerful
Communist Party called for him to step down.
In a nationally televised address, the 69-year-old Leone
described the allegations as groundless and told his fellow
Italians:
"AT A TIME WHEN the libelous campaign seems to have
undermined the confidence of political forces, I had no
other choice.. .
"For 6 12 years you had as president of the republic an
honest man who believes he has served the country with
constitutional correctness and moral dignity."
He had only six months to go on this seven-year term in
the mainly ceremonial post. He handed in his resignation to
the presidents of the two houses of Parliament and to
Premier Giulio Andreoitti, government television said.
THE SHOCK OF Leone's sudden fall came just five

weeks ai er ne muruer vi mnappeu r i u tim
Moro in a reign of urban terrorism that had seemed to draw
Italy's clashing political elements together. Moro had been
slated to succeed Leone in the presidency.
It was not immediately clear whether the departure of
the Christian Democrat president would open a new round
of political warfare between the Christian Democrats and
the Communists, Italy's two strongest parties.
Amintore Fanfani, president of the Italian Senate,
automatically becomes president on a temporary basis.
Under the constitution, Parliament must elect a new
national president within three weeks.
THE RESIGNATION call by the Communists, who are
crucial to the survival of the Christian Democrat minority
government, added a powerful voice to a chorus of deman-
ds from the left and right that Leone step down or im-
mediately offer a public defense to the charges.
See LEONE, Page8

;iovanni Leone

Documents
link 'U'
with CIA
By RENE BECKER
The Central Intelligence Agency's 25-
year search for a means to control the
human mind sparked Agency interest
in the faculty and facilities of the
University in the early 1950's.
Although most CIA documents con-
cerning their mind-control projects
were destroyed by the Agency in 1973,
several documents have surfaced
which show the CIA had an eye on the
University.
The CIA released to the University
last December the minutes of an AR-
TICHOKE (the CIA code name for one
of their first mind-control projects)
conference held February 19,1953.
IN THE document, Dr. Sidney Got-
tlieb, a CIA pharmacologist, stated that
the University was one of "five major
points where chemicals were being
tested and ARTICHOKE work is being
carried out."
University Vice President for
Research Charles Overberger
See NEW, Page 15

Can't wait
Crowds tug at the rail as they wait to get into see Foreigner perform at Pine Knob. See story, Page 7.

Dam work must halt,

WASHINGTON (AP) - The Supreme,
Court ruled yesterday that work on a
$116 million Tennessee dam must stop
because the Endangered Species Act
expressly protects the river home of a,
3-inch-long fish.
However, the decision involving the
Tellico Dam may represent only a tem-
porary reprieve for the snail darter, a
rare species of perch whose only known
natural habitat is a 17-mile stretch of
the Little Tennessee River.
Congressional supporters of the dam
said they would move hastily to change
the law.
THE SNAIL DARTER has been the
focal point of a classic battle between
environmentalists and comm.ercial in-,
terests.
Sa concerned was the Carter ad-'

ministration that it had Attorney
General Griffin Bell make a personal
appeal to the Supreme Court.
In his only appearance to date before
the high court, Bell, displaying a vial
containing a snail darter, said, in ef-
fect, that it was ridiculous that such a
small fish could cause so much trouble.
The court's decision climaxed a
three-year court fight over the question
of whether the law protecting en-
dangered species justified abandon-
ment of the nearly completed Ten-
nessee Valley Authority dam.
ENVIRONMENTALISTS seeking to
protect the fish had lost out in a federal
trial court, but won when the case was
taken to the Sixth U.S. Circuit Court of
Appeals. The Supreme Court's .6-3
decision upheld the appellate court

for fish
ruling.
"The plain intent of
Congress ... was to halt and reverse
the trend toward species extinction,
whatever the cost," Chief Justice
Warren Burger declared for the court's
majority.
Justices Lewis Powell Jr., Harry
Blackmun and William Rehnquist
dissented.
"I HAVE little doubt that Congress
will amend the Endangered Species Act
to prevent the grave consequences
made possible by today's decision,"
Powell wrote, adding:
"There will be little sentiment to
leave this dam standing before an em-
pty reservoi serving no purpose other
tah a ctctyvrsaito piece' for.in-'
cedtulous Idis.'''

fletrqit's Eastern Market on display,
seepages is-11.

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