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June 14, 1978 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-06-14

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Page 6-Wednesday, June 14, 1978-

The Michigan Daily
U.S. ENCOURAGED BY SOVIE T OFFER

Europe troop reduction possible
WASHINGTON (AP) - Soviet flexibility that will be needed" they will the proposed ceiling of 700,000 the
proposals to place equal ceilings on be welcomed by the United States. Soviets are proposing a withdrawl of sure that this was the case before.
Eastern and Western military forces in But an "essential first step" is the 105,000 while the West is calling for a - ACCORDING TO sources who he
central Europe may demonstrate the two sides agreeing how many Warsaw pullback of at least 250,000 Warsaw Brown at the commission's cos
sort of flexibility needed for agreement Pact troops actually are in central Pact troops. meeting, the defense secretary said t
on a mutual reduction of troops in the Europe now, he said. Most significant is that Moscow for Soviet proposal is not "necessarily a
area, the Carter administration said Western intelligence estimates there the first time has accepted the principle ceptable."
yesterday. are more than 950,000 Warsaw Pact of equal ceilings on Eastern and Brown reportedly told the meet
A State Department spokesman, troops in central Europe. The Soviets Western military forces in central that the Russians are "not quite
Thomas Reston, said that if the claim there are 805,000. Europe. rigid" as they were previously in t
proposals are "an indication of the THIS WOULD MEAN that to reach The Russians, making their negotiations and that he sees mo

rd
ed
he
ac-
ing
so
he
re

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, " Ia£ .1G1
proposals last week in Vienna, also said
they are willing to negotiate on the
basis of U.S. withdrawal of 1,000
nuclear weapons and 90 missiles and
planes instead of insisting that troops
pulling out take all their equipment
with them,
Defense Secretary Harold Brown told
a luncheon of the Trilateral Com-
mission that the Soviet proposal "shows
they are serious," while he is was not

chance of agreement than he thought
possible six months ago.
Marshall Shulman, special adviser to
the State Department on Soviet Affairs,
said it was "quite possible" the dif-
ferences with the Russians on numbers
can be worked out.
Shulman, in an interview with
National Public Radio, said any
agreement would be subject to obser-
vation and not based on trust,

Pentagon reconsiders
supersize submarines

JILL CLAYB
ALAN BATE
Uwoma

BURGH
:S

10:30
12:45
3:45
7:15
9:45
R

WASHINGTON (AP) - Pentagon
officials are studying the possibility of
sharply curtailing construction of ex-
pensive supersize Trident missile-firing
submarines, which President Carter
has called "our most important
strategic program."
Because of the record $1.1 billion cost
of Trident submarines, they are con-
sidering whether to develop a smaller
sub to carry the long-range Trident
missiles in the late 1980s and beyond.
Pentagon sources said Defense
Secretary Harold Brown is not convin-
ced that smaller submarines, about the
size of today's 425-foot Poseidon craft,
would cost much less than 560-foot
Trident boats in terms of their relative
missile power.
THE TRIDENTS will carry 24
missiles each, compared with 16
weapons aboard a Poseidon-size sub-
marine. Thus, fewer Trident subs
would be required as launch platforms
for an equivalent number of missiles.

"House
Calls"

10:15
1:15
4:00
6:45

WALTER MATTHAU j
GLENDA JACKSON
ART CARNEY
RICHARD BENJAMIN 0-0

i

There is no dispute that the present
fleet of 41 missile-firing submarines,
commissioned in the 1960s, should be
replaced in the 1980s, although Brown is
known to believe their useful lives can
be extended.
There is also general agreement that
a modernized missile-firing submarine
force will be even more important in
the future as U.S. land-based missiles
become vulnerable to a possible Soviet
surprise attack.
IN HIS STATE of the Union message
last January, Carter said he was asking
for money in the fiscal 1979 budget "for
continued increase in our Trident sub-
marine force, which is our most impor-
tant strategic program because sub-
marines are so hard for an enemy to
destroy."
The administration's approved
program calls for construction of 13 of
the 18,700-ton Trident subs and defense
officials have projected an eventual
fleet of 20.
But members of Congress have
become increasingly concerned about
high costs and about shipyard delays of
up to 19 months on the first five sub-
marines under construction. Two ad-
ditional Trident subs are under con-
tract, Navy officials said.
SOME OF THE Trident sub's advan-
ced features-including new and
quieter machinery, higher speeds,
longer endurance and improved
sonar-might be incorporated in the
smaller new submarien. That could cut
down any time loss.
The Trident missile, with a range
about 1,700 miles longer than present
Poseidon missiles, is to become com-
bat-ready in late 1979. At that time, it
wil be placed in 10 of the present
Poseidon boats.
The Russians already have deployed
submarine-launched weapons with
ranges equal to and longer than the
Trident missile. The Soviets also are
reported working on a new Typhoon-
class submarine.
Correction
The Daily Arts staff wishes to
apologize for a mistake in yesterday's
paper. The Ark review and the accom-
panying photograph were of Bob Schet-
ter, not Leo Kretzner. We rgret the
error, nd hope that this sets a te story

J T$ I AtS NEVE
To, 5Ay yoU'R IN 10E:40

EXTRA TONITE ONLY!
HOLLYWOOD
MAJOR STUDIO
ATURE
TONIT
AT
9:00
A vance ow ng
of a new-feature
prior to its regu-
lr release.
"A SAFE
PLACE"
starring
JACK NICHOLSON

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