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May 04, 1978 - Image 15

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-05-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Doily-Thwrsdy, May 4, 1978-Pege 15
MORE PROTEST EXPECTED OVER 'U'INVESTMENTS:

South African debate continues

(Contnued fromPage3) .
year.
CORPORATE GIFTS and grants to
the Unviersity in the fiscal year 1976
totalled $6 million. According to the
report if -in 1976 the University had not
invested in corporations operating in
South Africa it would not be able to ac-
cept gifts or grants from those same
corporations. The University weld
tehn have accepted $1.6 millien less in
corporate gifts.
Although all voting Regents favor
maintaining ties with South Africa, one
Regent emeritus, Allen Sorenson who
served on the Board in the 60s, wrote a
letter to University President Robben
Fleming expressing his disappointment
with the decision not to divest.
In his letter, Sorenson wrote that the
Regents now serving place too much
faith in American corporations' ability
and willigness to change the political
system of South Africa. According to
Sorenson, to end apartheid, "radical
measures will be needed, measures
which severely affect the South African
economy."
SORENSON WROTE that while
divestiture is only a symbol, it is the
most the University can do and he
urged the Regents "to proceed ex-
peditiously with divestiture."
At the April Regents meeting,
Michigan Student Assembly (MSA)
member Kate Rubin reported to the
Board that a large majority of students
favor divestment.
In the recent MSA election, 72.7 per
cent of the voters approved a~referen-
dum which states that University
students oppose financial ties to South
Africa and therefore urge the Regents
to withdraw investments in those cor-
Carter backs
(Continued from Page i)
Department of Energy by the private,
non-profit Midwest Research Institute
of Kansas City.
"NO CARTEL controls the sun," Car-
ter said inan apparent reference to the
Arab oil embargo of 1973-74. "Its
energy will not run out. It will not
pollute our air or poison our waters. It

porations conducting business there,
she said.
RUBIN ALSOK presented the Regen-
ts with a MSA resolution calling for the
establishment of a permanent "In-
vestments Advisory Committee"
charged with investigating cor-
porations doing business in South
Africa and in which the University has
investments.
Besides Detwyler there were seven
other speakers at the meeting who
favored divestiture and, if need be, the
establishment of the MSA-suggested
oversight committee. Detwyler urged
the Regents to accept their "social
responsibility."
As directed by the Regents in their
March meeting, James Brinkerhoff,
University chief financial advisor, sent
letters to all corporations which do
business in South Africa and in which
the University owns stock.
ACTING AS the Regents' represen-
tative, Brinkerhoff stated in the letters:
"We are strongly opposed to apartheid
and racial injustice." In the letters he
asks the corporations to:
* Affirm the Sullivan principles; (a
corporate policy which provides equial
treatment of blacks and whites within
the corporate facilities.)
* Endorse political, economic and
social rights for all corporate em-
ployees in South Africa;
" Make regular reports to publicly
disclose corporate progress in these
matters.
However in his letter to Fleming,
Sorenson wrote: "The assumption that
improved working conditions ina given
factory will affect the government's
policy against equal pay or against
blacks in supervisory positions over
solar energy
is free from stench and smog. The sun's
power needs only to be collected, stored
and used.
"The question is no longer whether
solar energy works," he added.
"We know it works. The only question
is how to cut costs so that solar power
can be used more widely and set a cap
on rising oil prices."

whites is naive." table, but the racial inequalities will not
According to Sorenson, the result of be changed."
the Regents' action is that, "some "At that time, the next step in the
years will pass in which attempts are Regents' program, divestiture, may be
made to exert influence which is taken, and the intervening time in
assumed feasible, and after that time, which the more effective course might
some corporations' facilities for black have been in effect, will be lest," he
employees will be made mere comfor- said.
MichiganDoGily-Clasifieds
Bring Results I -Call 764-0557

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