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June 03, 1978 - Image 16

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-06-03

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Page 16-Saturday June 3, 1978-The Michigan Daily
Sporting Views
USC's Trojans . .
Dedeaux's diamond dynasty
By JAMIE TURNER OMAHA
ROD DEDEAUX'S heart bleeds Trojan red. For
37 years Dedeaux has cajoled, pleaded, pushed
and manufactured a Southern California baseball
legend that is the envy of every coach. Dedeaux is the
winningest coach in the country, the only man to have
over 1000 wins. Eleven times he has brought USC
teams to Omaha and ten times they have emerged vic-
torious.
This year is no different. Southern Cal is loaded and
enter the College World Series as the number one
rated team in the country. The Trojans have a team
batting average of .313 and average five more runs
than they give up.
"My philosophy is to get better players every year,"
said Dedeaux hours before the Trojans were to meet
Miami of Florida in a first round game. "And then to
get out of the way and let their natural talents
develop."
As usual, every player on the Trojan team is from
California, and every one was sought after by several
other teams. But in the end, it's the sweet talking
Dedeaux and the lure of USC tradition that had the high
school seniors lining up to enter.
"With the background and tradition that USC has, it
would only be natural for a boy to want to attend
Southern Cal," added Dedeaux. "We have a great
athletic and academic heritage, and it no doubt helps
our recruiting."
The "natural talent" has included major league
standouts Tom Seaver, Fred Lynn, Bill Lee, Ron
Fairly and Steve Kemp. However, team success is not
the only goal for the 64 year old coach.
"I would like to see all of them be a success in life,"
said Dedeaux. "This year we had a reunion of the
NCAA Championship teams of 1948, 1958, and 1968. Of
the '48 team, 20 showed up and are prominent in their
chosen profession. I think that shows a lot of class."
TOURNAMENT TIDBITS
If USC has won more NCAA Baseball Championship
than any other team, who comes in second? It's
Arizona State with four titles.
The Sun Devils have three of the four tournament
players who are batting over .400. Hubie Brooks (.436),
Bob Horner (.425), and Chris Bando (.416) join
Michigan's Rick Leach (.410) in that select group. ASU
has the highest team batting average with a .352 mark,
while the Wolverines' .265 is the lowest.
Michigan's 2.84 team ERA is third best behind
Miami and USC while Arizona State carries an inflated
4.16 mark.
While Arizona State is the defending champion, the
prevailing opinion is that Southern Cal is the team to
beat. ASU was awesome in the regionals, scoring 82
runs in five games, but USC has won five straight one
run decisions to get this far-a mark of a champion.
Of the other six teams, Michigan and Miami are
given the best chance of upsetting the western clubs,
with Oral Roberts and North Carolina dark horse
possibilities. St. John's and Baylor appear to be also
rans.
Finally, no coach wants to get the Sun Devils upset.
In the first game of the NCAA Districts, Nevada-Las
Vegas ran all over ASU, winning 17-10. Arizona State
won the rematch ... 30-5.
Daily sportswriter Jamie Turner is with the Michigan base-
ball team in Omaha, Nebraska, reporting on the Wolverines'
drive for the national championship. This is the first of his
special reports.
MICHIGAN BAYLOR
ab r h bi abr h bi
Anderson 2 ....... 4 0 0 0 Crosby s .......... 3 0 0 0
Chapman 3b ....... 4 1 1 0 Connally 3b ........ 4 0 0 0
Leachf ........... 4 0 1 0 Nolen rf .......... 4 0 0 0
Parker rf .......... 3 0 2 1 Kilkho st c ........ 4 0 0 0
Foussanes dh ..... 4 1 0 0 Ordones 2b ........ 2 0 0 0
Capoeric ......... 4 0 0 0 JohansonIf ........ 3 0 1 0
Wasilewskilb..... 3 1 0 0 Prestridge b...... 3 0 0 0
Berrass........... 4 0 0 0 Lumus dh ......... 2 0 0 0
Ray If ............. 3 1 1 3 W ells cf . ......... 3 0 0 0
Totals ............. 33 4 6 4 Totals............ 2 0 0 .
E-Wells. DP-None. LOB-Baylor 4. Michigan 4. 2B-Chpman.o3B-None.
HR-Ray ).
MICHIGAN..........000 031 000-4
Baylor...........000 000 000-0
Michigan ip h r er bb so
Howe W(11-2)....... 9 1 0 0 2 6
Baylor
PearlmanL(5-3).- ........- . 0 .4 1 2 0
Roberto- - - - - - --...... ...... 00 0"01

Howe about that!
'M' one-hits Baylor

By JAMIE TURNER
SpecialtoThe Daly
OMAHA - There are now three
things assured oflin life. Death,
taxes, and a Michigan win with
Steve Howe on the mound.
For the third time in as many
efforts, sophomore Howe breezed
through nine innings with a good
hitting team - this time the
Baylor Bears - as Michigan took
one step en route to a collegiate
World Series Championship with
a 4-0 victory last night in Omaha.
Except for a scratch infield hit
by left fielder Mike Johhanson in
the second inning, Howe befud-
dled the Bears with a sinking
fastball and an effective
change!up. Fellow sophomore
Vic Ray provided the winning
margin with a two-out fifth inning
three-run homer over the leftfield
wall, his first of the season and
Michigan's first hit of the game.
"HE HAD just thrown me a
fastball, and I thought he'd come
back with a slider," said the san-
dy-haired left fielder, "but it was
another fastball and I hit it real
-well."
Michigan set the table for
Ray's home run when George
Foussianes reached second on
center fielder Mike Wells' muff of
an easy flyball. With one out, Bob
Wasilewski walked, and both
runners moved up one base on
Jim Berra's infield out.
An insurance run scored in the
sixth when Dave Chapman
doubled down the leftfield line.
After taking third on a passed
ball, the Wolverines' third sacker
came home on Mike Parker's

single up the middle.
UNTIL RAY'S blast, Howe and
Baylor starter and loser John
Pearlman matched goose eggs,
Pearlman striking out four of the
first eight Wolverines he faced.

along. That's the way it went."
THERE WERE only seven hits
in the well-pitched ball game,
perhaps due to the week-long
layoff or opening game jitters.
"We didn't know anything
about Baylor other than that it
was a good-hitting team," said
Michigan coach Moby Benedict.
"When you come into a tour-
nament such as this you have to
do what you do best. For us, it
was throw strikes and fielding the
ball."
The Howe one-hitter was the
seventh in College World Series
history and the Clarkson native's
ninth shutout in his brief two-year
career. Howe has given up just
six earned runs in the last 631/3
innings, lowering his season ERA
to 1.57.
"I wasn't nervous," said Howe.
"When we get a lead it gets my
adrenalin going and I seem to
throw harder."
BENEDICT WAS non-
committal on when Howe could
pitch again. Noting that his
hurler had thrown only slightly
more than 120 pitches, Benedict
left the door open for a relief
showing Sunday afternoon.
"Howe didn't exert himself out
there - it was a perfect day to
pitch."
Michigan now will face the
winner of the Miami-USC Friday
night game Sunday afternoon at 6
p.m. EDT. Steve Perry (3-1) or
Tom Owens (5-3) will start for the
Wolverines and, hope to put
Michigan well on its way to the
championship.

Vie Ray
However, despite the one-hitter,
Howe didn't feel fully confident
with his pitches.
"As a matter of fact, I didn't
have good stuff," stated Howe, "I
had no slider and I just tried to
throw strikes. I think they were
playing a bit of a guessing game
with my slider, and I was able to
get the fastball by them."
."We just had too much Steve
Howe," said Baylor coach
Mickey Sullivan. "The kid pit-
ched a great ball game. We knew
we had to get to him early,
because all reports had said that
he got stronger as the game went

AP Photo
Attempting to read the speed of the 17th green, Arnold Palmer confers with his Timex after hitting the
ball. The big hand was just a little slow as Palmer missed his birdie try but remained the leader of the
Kemper Open Golf Tournament. Arnie's seven-under total of 137 after two rounds is good for a one-shot lead
over Tom Weiskopf and Craig Stadler.

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