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May 26, 1978 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-05-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 14--Friday, May 26, 1978-The Michigan Daily
Atlantic City
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) - The
Boardwalk is damp, the surf is chilly
and Miss America isn't in town, but
nobody cares because the nation's only T
legal gambling casino outside Nevada
is expected to open here this morning.
Barring a last minute legal snag, the
dice will roll and the wheels will turn at
10 a.m. in the former Chalfonte-Haddon
Hall Hotel, now Resorts International
Hotel Casino, which has undergone a
$40 million renovation.
AFTER MONTHS of writing
regulations on everything from black-
jack to showgirl's pasties, the New Jer-
sey Casino Control Commission was
meeting in Trenton yesterday to clear
away the final legal hurdles to grant the
hotel a certificate of operation to open
its casino.
One of the questions facing the com-
mission was whether to approve the
casino's request for $5 minimums on
gaming tables or its staff recommen-
dations for a large number of $2 tables.
The hotel's casino, which is about half
the size of a football field, will open with
893 slot machines, 60 blackjack tables,
10 craps tables, 10 roulette wheels,
three baccarat tables and three wheels
of fortune. A 50 percent expansion of the
gaming area is planned within three
months.
ON THE STREETS, local and state
police fear that 400,000 cars may A "ROOKIE" dealers
converge on this small island for the which is all set for toda
first casino weekend and the

casino ready to roll

7'p1I, flg! I

New Jersey voters approved gam-
bling for Atlantic City in November 1976
after turning down a proposal two years
earlier to allow casinos anywhere in the
state.
THE FLORIDA-BASED conglomer-
ate, which owns two hotels and operates
two casinos in the Bahamas, was given
a temporary casino permit last week.
The permit is good for up to nine
months as state authorities continue an
investigation into the firm on its ap-
plication for a permanent license.
Resorts International casino is ex-
pected to gross more than $100 million
in its first year, whith 8 percent going to
the state for senior citizens and the
disabled.
Several other serious casino develop-
ers, including Playboy, Penthouse and
Caesar's Palace, are waiting to see Re-
sorts International's profits before
building their own casino hotels on the
Boardwalk. So far, no one has secured
the long-term financing needed to build
the $50 million to $115 million casino
palaces proposed.
Five nights of "test runs" last week
jammed the casino with thousands of
excited sightseers carelessly betting
$100 bills in play money on tables and
real nickels, quarters and dollar coins
in the slot machines, which could not
accept slugs.
The play nights were designed to ease
the nervousness of 495 rookie dealers
and scores of state gaming inspectors.

AP Photo
stands by the Big Six wheel at the Atlantic City casino
y's scheduled opening.

traditionally hectic Memorial Day
holiday. Gov. Brendan Byrne said state
troopers might seal off the city if traffic
stalled.
Although the Boardwalk might not

see its second casino for more than
year, it is hoped that gambling w
revitalize this once-fashionable reso
where the likes of Diamond Jim Brad
and John Philip Sousa have long sinc

a
ill
rt
ly

given way to bankrupt hotels, burned-
out neighborhoods and 20 percent
unemployment.

What d'ya say there,
Watson ol boy?
Think you could sell a few Daily subscrip-
tions during freshman orientation?
The pay is good ... $3.65 /hour.
You can work full or part time.
And with your . . . um . . . winning per-
sonality, it should be a breeze.
What d'ya say, Watson?
Give 'em a ring at the Daily, 764-0560
WORK/STUDY ONLY

e
Georgia prosecutor: Flynt
shooting was a conspiracy
LAWRENCEVILLE, Ga. (AP) - A "We believe there was more than one
prosecutor said yesterday he believes trigger man," Huff said.
"there are several persons involved" in The prosecutor, holding his first news
the shooting of Hustler magazine owner conference since the ambush of Flynt,
Larry Flynt - and that they may be 35, and a local lawyer, said he believes
linked to Flynt's own Ohio-based Lawrenceville was selected by the con-
publishing empire or to organized spirators so the crime could be blamed
crime. on "some redneck from Georgia," ob-
He said the possible motives involve scuring the real motive.
"internal business problems within his
company, business problems cross the HUFF SAID investigators have
country and the role of organized crime narrowed the investigation to "four
in pornography." avenues" and that "specific individuals
. perhaps in Ohio" are under in-
DISTRICT ATTORNEY Bryant Huff vestigation.
of Gwinnett County, Ga., where Flynt The prosecutor said Flynt's interview
was gunned down and left paralyzed with two Gwinnett County detectives
March 6 during a recess in his obscenity earlier this week "confirmed the truth
trial, said none of those believed to be of a lot of stories we had heard which
involved are local people. were possible motives."

r

WONDERING What
to eat tonight?
BELL'S hasgreat
pizza & grinders!
S. State & Packard-995-0232
open from 11 a.m. to Ia. m.
FREE DELIVERIES from 4:30 p.m.

14

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