100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 04, 1978 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-05-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily-Thursday, May 4, 1978-Page 3

MORE PROTEST EXPECTED OVER 'U' INVESTMENTS:

A
mot
sell
por
sidi
in
gro
pre
the
V
con

South African debate continues
By RENE BECKER 1978 gave about 30 protesters the oppor- crowd of about 15,000 booed the As a result of a Freedom of I
ADailyNews Analyis tunity to bring national attention to protesters and loudly applauded Mon- mation Act (FOIA) request, Unive
unani-stheir cause. The demonstrators disrup- dale. geography professor Thomas Dets
lthough the Regents voted unani- ted Mondale four times with shouts of The protesters' goal was to draw at- obtained a copy of a University re
usly at their March meeting not to "U of M-USA out of South Africa right tention to their cause, and on that score which shows the financial implica
1 University investments in cor- they were successful. The story about of divestiture.
ations with South African sub- ACKNOWLEDGING the protest over protest during Mondale's commen- The report - giventoDetm
aries, the isssue is far from resolved American corporate involvement in cement address at the University was after the Regents vetoed d
the eyes of a growing number of South Africa, Mondale told the carried by the United Press Inter- titure - reveals that besides
ups and individuals who continue to protesters: "If the plea is for social naional, the Associated Press, the New "significant transaction cost in ch
ss the issue before the Regents and justice and human rights, there could York Times,. the Detroit newspapers, the portfolio composition," divest
University community. be no more decent plea than that." and ABC network news. could mean the loss of several m
ice President Walter Mondale's Audience response to the demon- PROFESSORS ALSO are involved in dollars in gifts to the Universitye
nmencement address to the class of stration was not encouraging-the the protests over investments. See SOUTH, Page 15

nfor-
rsity
wyler
eport
tions
wyler
lives-
the
aning
iture
illion
every

GEO's future could
hinge on hearings

{
J
1
1
c
r
1

By TOM O'CONNELL to represent teaching assistants in
A series of hearings will begin next collective bargaining could be ham-
Monday which could determine the pered.
future of the embattled Graduate Em- GEO plans to have a large number of
ployees Organization (GEO). teaching assistants testify, proving that
The hearings, which will be held in they all perform similar functions.
the Michigan Union, were ordered by "We'll present evidence demon-
the Michigan Employment Relations strating that definite duties are
Commission (MERC), in order to assigned," said GEO Treasurer Bob
determine the crucial question of Milbrath. "There are definite times and
whether Graduate Student Assistants definite responsibilities."
(GSAs) are primarily students or em- "We're going to rely on repetition,"
ployees of the University. Milbrath added. "We'll show the same
TAt things over and over again in each
THE UNIVERSITY contends that category."
GSAs are students and that their
teaching positions are a form of finan- ADMINISTRATION spokesman
cial aid. Joseph Katulic feels equally confident
GEO asserts that the amount of time the hearings will show GSAs are not
and work which the GSAs must put into covered by Michigan's Public Em-
their work proves they are primarily ployment Relations Act, and therefore
employees. not entitled to bring the ULP "charge
Administrative Law Judge Shlomo before MERC. -
Sperka has been chosen by MERC to "MERC doesn't have jurisdiction to
preside over the sessions and make the make a ruling because they (GSAs)
student-employee ruling. Should aren't employees under the meaning of
Sperka decide in favor of GEO, a path the act," Katulic said.
would be opened for the organization to The charge stems from a refusal by
press an unfair labor practices (ULP) the University to sign an agreed-upon
charge against the University in front contract with GEO in November 1976.
of MERC. The charge stems from a 1/2- The administration declined to sign
year-old contract dispute. that pact until two unsettled grievances
left over from a previous contract were
IF SPERKA RULES in favor of the resolved.x
University administration, GEO efforts See GEO, Page 5 Singer John Denver op
to d aday before a noon-hour
fiti and will give $200 to the student who submits the
Subscribe to the Daily best sample. The only requirements are that the
scribblings be original and found on bathroom
We may not look quite the same, but the Daily is walls. You can send those choice tidbits to him at
back for spring and summer, publishing five days a P.O. Box 13411, Sacramento, CA 95813.
wecis:,- fi-: n tauuiuTi n ramern 4"2 CAu a lidil-Le

High on sunshine AP Photo
ens Sun Day festivities in Detroit's Kennedy Square yester-
rcrowd of :3,000. See story, Page One.

weeK in tabioid form. For a mere $3.5o a nailf-term
($4 by mail outside of Ann Arbor) the Daily will
greet you every Tuesday through Saturday mor-
ning. Order for the whole summer and it's an even
better bargain-just $6.50, $7 outside the city. Sub-
scriptions outside of Ann Arbor must be prepaid. To
order, call our circulation department at 764-0558 or
stop by our offices at 420 Maynard, upstairs.
Writing on the wall
So that all of those hours spent in Angell Hall
won't have been for naught, a California writer is
offering you a chance to cash in on what you've
learned within those hallowed halls. But he's not in-
terested in your psych t.a.'s pearls of wisdom. Nor
does he care about your poli sci prof's writings on
the blackboard. He's looking for other writingon the
wall - graffiti to be exact. Steve Young of
Sacramento is compiling a book on collegiate graf-

Happenings ...
... are somewhat scarce today. At 3:45, Sampel
Gershon of New York University's Medical CXenter
talks about "Psychopharmacologic Specificity of
the Lithium Ion" in 1057 MHRI .. the Sailing Club
holds an open meeting at 7:45 in room 170 of the
Physics and Astronomy Building featuring a slide
show. All persons interested in learning to sail are
invited ... at 8:15, Prof. Thomas Sebeok of Indiana
University discusses "Prefigurements of Art" in
Rackham Lecture Hall. Better luck tomorrow.
Re-covered
A former Utah State University student finally
owned up to a 30-year old crime: he admitted he

stole an army blanket from the school. Utah State
President Glen Taggert got a letter and a check
from the remorseful alum who lifted the blanket
when he enrolled at the school just after World War
II. At the time, furnishings were about as sparse as
they are here at the 'U' today. Each student
received an army cot, sheets and two blankets. But,
the Utah student explained, "The first night was too
cold for the two blankets issued, and the person
issuing was not available, so I took another blanket.
All of that might have been all right, except that I
did not return that blanket when I turned in the
other two." Instead of returning the worn-out cover,
he prices surplus army blankets and found the goilg
rate to be around $7.50. So just to be fair, he sent
Taggert a check for $10. You might say he found
himself blanketed in guilt.
On the outside ...
Our optimistic weather source says it will be
partly sunny today. Our pessimistic source says it
will be partly cloudy. Take your pick. The high
should be about 60' with an overnight low in the up-
per 30s

I -I II -. -- I- - . . . - V 1 A - 1 3 W '
. -I, 1 , &I- 1 4V W- 1 9 K 9 5K Or

[ i f f
I
yE j J }
'F t1 Ib i} q b " 1
a s r'aYa " a r* a
.r , +.. v.r-t r z s" r r s s s v f s" f"" e s 1

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan