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May 25, 1978 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-05-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

?oily-Thursday, May 25, 1978-Page 3
Green
cheese
and other
exoticas
By DOUGLAS HELLER
Leah Dunham is constantly surroun-
ded by exotic wines and cheeses, but
she is not always being wined and
dined.
Dunham runs a Kerrytown specialty
food shop filled with candies, jams,
pasta, breads, spices and teas as well
as spirits and cheddars.
"I LIKE anything to do with food,"
she said, explaining her reasons for
opening Dunham-Wells, Inc. with her
nephew insided the Fifth Ave. market.
"I was raised on cheddar, but there
were not so many cheeses available
then, the market has really grown sin-
ce."
Dunham still nurtures a penchant for
cheese, and while she admits to eating
her fair share of the stuff, she says she
has no favorite variety. She can sym-
pathize with customers who struggle to
See CHEESE, Page 11

A CUSTOMER GAZES hungrily at the array of cheeses at a Kerrytown specialty shop. With a menu sporting everything
from good old Swiss to a wine-tinged grape, she might well be there all day trying to make up her mind.

Detroit allows unrelated pairs to cohabitate

By JUDY RAKOWSKY
Unwed cohabitants in Detroit can
stop hiding from their neighbors and
dodging the police since City Council
approved an ordinance yesterday per-
mitting unrelated persons to live
together in residential neighborhoods.
The legislation not only restricts the
allowance to two persons, but those
persons cannot be served by separate
kitchen facilities. The separate kitchen
rule was added in response to citizen
concern that such dwelling situations
encourage neighborhoods full of
rooming houses. Prior to this action, it
was illegal for two unrelated persons of
the same or opposite sex to share a
home.
No such regulations exist in Ann Ar-
bor because discrimination dn the basis
r-today

of marital status is outlawed by the
Human Rights ordinance. In Warren,
Michigan, up to five unrelated persons
are permitted to live together, and
some other Detroit suburbs permit up
to three unrelated individuals to
cohabitate.
THE LAW against this situation was
only enforced when complaints alerted
the authorities, according to Coun-
cilman Clyde Cleveland
The new ordinance emerged as a
result of complaints by a group of
Palmer Park residents who were con-
cerned about a house on their block in
which 18-unrelated persons were living
together. The issue was ultimately
brought before Council by home owner
Rene Amaya who was taken to court by
the Palmer Park group for living with
Robert Johnson.

Cleveland said, "We couldn't say it's
alright for two (to live together) but not
'Lifestyles have changed,
family life is different ...
and Ithk the lw should
reflect th is.'
-Detroit Councilman
David Eberhard
for 18. We couldn't have selective en-
forcement," regarding the past ap-

plication of the cohabitation law.
Councilman David Eberhard said
Tuesday, "Lifestyles have changed,
family life is different . .. and I think
the law should reflect this," according
to United Press International.
Opponents of the law - no Council
members spoke against it - expressed
concern that encouraging unrelated
persons to live together would result in
many living situations that resemble
rooming houses. Their concern prom-
pted the conditions for the law such as
the separate kitchen rule.
Cleveland said, "I don't think it (the
new law) will turn neighborhoods into
rooming houses." He added that the
impact of the legislation upon neigh-
borhoods will be closely watched.

V

Shortening our stripes
Those yellow and white lane-marking stripes on
the highway will be shorter and further apart this.
year. The Federal Highway Administration just
decided to let the state save money by using less
paint on the road, about $100,000 less. The question
is: will the lines on the road still look like dots?
Happenings.. .
... begin for the young at heart at 10 when the
Ann Arbor Public Library sponsors an hour of story
telling for kindergartners ... bigger kids then head
for the East Alcove Room of the Rackham
Building where the Rackham Student Government
holds a meeting at 11 . . at noon Hillel sponsors a
Diag brown bag Lag B'omer celebration . takea
walk and then at 5:30 the Organizing Committee for
Clericals will hold a 7:30 meeting in the Lord of
Light Lutheran Church at 801 S. Forest ... at 7:30,°
the Washtenaw County Comprehensive Health

Planing Council invites everyone to a discussion on
"School Health in Washtenaw County" at the Coun-
ty Road Commission, 555 N. Zeeb Road ... at 8 en-
joy a Brahms concert by the International String
Quartet. The chamber Music celebration is in the
Michigan Ballroom in the Union ... also at 8, a
friend from OSU, chemist Perry Sefray explains
"Stereochemical Aspects of Enzyme Action" in 1300
Chemistry . .. and finally, at the same time, can-
didates for the School Board will debate at the city
Democratic Party meeting in the downstairs
meeting room of the city library,
Bar none
The Food and Drug Administration put the finger
on those breakfast bars some people call "a meal."
The organization announced yesterday the recall of
14 million Carnation Breakfast Bars and Slender
Diet Meal Bars that may contain "varying lengths
of wire." They come in various flavors and have

made their way to England, Germany, Bermuda,
and U.S. military posts around the world. Try oat-
meal instead.
See you ... in court?
He asked her out. She said yes, but then couldn't
make it. Now the 30-year-old accountant has sued
the waitress for $38, saying he won't take being
stood up lying down. Because Alyn Chesselt, also 30,
broke an "oral contract" to have dinner and see the
musical "The Whiz" with Tom Harsley, the San
Fransican is suing her. "He's blown everything out
of proportion and he's just doing this to bug me,"
said Chesselet. Ain't love grand?
On the outside ...
Both temperature and humidity are on the rise
today. It'll be mostly sunny and close to 80 by the af-
ternoon.

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