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May 24, 1978 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-05-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Camping on campus?
By JUDY RAKOWSKY popular? Perhaps the graduates regard
It's not the Rivieria, and it hardly such outings as an opportunity to
compares with the Bahaman or Palm become nostalgic about their carefree
Beach, but the college campus may college days, or to show the children
someday replace the cross-country where mommy and daddy attained
vacation trek that many equate with their vast wisdom. But it just may be
family holidays, the price, cheaper than commercial
Thousands of alumni families resort respite, is the true attraction.
migrate to at least 100 college cam- Until this year the University offered
puses each summer for a family cam- an on-campus offshoot to its
ping experience. Such camps are geographically dispersed program for
sprinkled across the country from Cor- three summers. The local version was
nell to Stanford, including four off- concelled this year due to waning in-
campus sites in the University Alum- terest. Who could resist the opportunity
ni Association's family camping to play in the University's wind tunnel,
program. "camp out" in the dorms, or gawk atall
the real live academics strolling the
SOME LOCATIONS, like American campus?
University in Washington, D.C. try to THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION offers
combine education with relaxation with camping opportunities in the Sierras of
visits to historic sites. Others, like Cor- California, the Alps of Switzerland, the
nell, are situated in natural vacation Adirondacks of New York, and the
atmospheres with scenic mountains serene environs of northern Michigan's
and crystal lakes. Walloon Lake.
What makes the college camps so Families keep busy with sports
New security guard
company to protect 'U

The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, May 24, 1978-Page 9
Some families like it
during the day and faculty-directed ts, but just imagine what it would be
discussions at night. The food is catered like ten years from now to gather with
and the rustic wilderness is endured in balding, bare-bellied classmates to
all-electric cabins. trade tales of toddlers and reminisce
Admittedly, the attraction of the about those "carefree" college
camps may escape present-day studen- days ...
'Ill I

DAILY EARLY BIRD MATINEES -- Adults $1 .25
E DISCOUNT IS FOR SHOWS STARTING BEFORE 1:30
MON. thru SAT. 10 A.M. tit i:3b P.M. SUN. & HOLS.12 Noon til 1:30 P.M.

.dl

EVENING ADMISSIONS AFTER 5:00, $3.50 ADULTS
Monday-Saturday 1:30-5:00, Admission $2.50 Adult and Students
Sundays and Holidays 1:30 to Close, $3.50 Adults, $2.50 Students
Sunday-Thursday Evenings Student & Senior Citjzen Discounts
Children 12 And Under, Admissions $1.25

By THOMAS O'CONNELL
The University will begin receiving
security guard protection from a new
company July 1.
Burns Security will be replaced by
State Security. According to Frederick
Davids, director of the Department of
Safety at the University, the change
will not result in significant job losses
among current guards, since ap-
proximately 90 per cent of them will
switch over to the new company.
THE UNIVERSITY employs about 40
security guards, who patrol buildings
and campus grounds after dark.
Davids said the contract was awar-
ded to State Security because it presen-
ted the best overall package in recent
contract bidding. He added that the
Univesity considered a number of
criteria in awarding the contract.
"We took the one that offered the best

package across the board," said
Davids, "including employee benefits."
DAVIDS POINTED OUT that State
Security guards "will not be supporting
a big corporation," and therefore a
smaller percentage of the security fun-
ds will be spent on administrative costs.
Davids also said the University will
benefit in a number of ways from the
new contract. He cited improved
training for guards as well as an
upgraded communications system in
which all guards will be equipped with
two-way radios.
An added benefit, according to
Davids, is that State Security has no
other contracts in the area. This will
lessen the chances that a guard will be
transferred to another site, leaving the
University shorthanded.
State Security will probably have its
offices located on campus, possible in
the old St. Joseph Hospital building.

TICKET SALES
1. Tickets sold no sooner than 30 minutes
prior to showtilne.
2. No tickets sold later than 15 minutes
after showtime.
"Hooray for Jill Clayburghl She makes
the jump to star in this marvelous film."
12:45
3:45
7:15
9:45
R
1:15
4:00
6:45
9:15
WALTER MATTHAU ART CARNEY
GLENDA JACKSON RICHARD BENJAMIN
OFPDNTH
IN THE FACE
GOPL

UEA -o- - :111 I
DAILY EARLY BIRD MATINEES -- Adults $1 .25
DISCOUNT IS FOR SHOWS STARTING BEFORt -30
MON. ttwu SAT.t10 A.M. tit 1:30 P.M. SUN. & HOLS.12 Noon tii :30 P.M.
EVENING ADMISSIONS AFTER 5:00, $3.50 ADULTS
Monday-Saturday 1:30-5:00, Admission $2.50 Adult and Students
Sundays and Holidays 1:30 to Close, $3.50 Adults, $2.50 Students
Sunday-Thursday Evenings Student & Senior Citizen Discounts
Children 12 And Under, Admissions $1.25
TICKET SALES
1. Tickets sold no sooner than 30 minutes
prior to showtirne.
2. No tickets sold later than 15 minutes

"THE E
A comnedy for you andyo
IN
BURT REYNOLDS
DOM DeLUISE
SALLY FIELD
u STROTHER MARTIN
v DAVID STEINBERG

1:00
4:15
7:00
9:30

_ , ,. ,

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