100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 04, 1978 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-05-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Vol . XXXV111, No. 2-S
ThursdayCMay4,1978
ni..I Twenty Pages
Ann Arbor, Michigan Ten Cents Plus Supplement
Carter proposes
increased funds

for solar
GOLDEN, Colo. (AP) - President
Carter, in a "Sun Day" address cut
short by rain yesterday, proposed in-
creased spending for solar projects and
promised to develop a new "national
solar strategy."
Making his first stop on a planned
three-day Western trip, Carter visited
the future site of the federally funded
Solar Energy Research Institute near
Golden, Colo., and spoke to a crowd of
about 300 persons.
. IN A SURPRISE announcement,
Carter said he would order the Energy
Department to shift $100 million to solar
and other renewable-resource energy
projects in next year's proposed
budget.
"This is an appropriate day to con-
centrate government efforts on solar
energy," he said. The announcement
drew applause and cheers from the
audience.
The 9-month-old Solar Energy
Research Institute now operates in
temporary offices in Golden. Carter
said ground would be broken for the in-
stitute's permanent home next year.
REFERRING TO the president's
pledge to shift more money to solar
energy, press secretary Jody Powell
told reporters aboard Air Force One
that Carter and Energy Secretary

energy
James Schlesinger had been "cooking
up" the idea for some time but that Car-
ter had wanted to save the announ-
cement as a surprise.
As originally drafted, the president's
speech mentioned no precise figures on
new spending goals for renewable
energy projects.
Carter had noted in the prepared text,
however, that his proposed spending for
fiscal 1979 contains a 64 percent in-
crease in money for development of
solar power.
THE PRESIDENT also had planned
to announce a new $14 million loan to
the city of Lamar, Colo., for a project to
convert livestock excrement into
methane gas. But after the original
draft of the speech was distributed to
reporters, the president discovered that
Sen. Floyd Haskell (D-Colo.) had an-
nounced the project Tuesday.
In his Golden speech, Carter announ-
ced he is ordering a new Cabinet-level
study to develop a national solar
strategy and praised solar energy as a
potential counterweight to rising oil
prices.
"Nobody can embargo sunlight," the
president told his audience at the Solar
Energy Research Institute, a federally
financed project operated for the
See CARTER, Page 15

Doily Photo by JOHN KNOX
MEMBERS OF THE University's track team generate their own energy as
they practice behind the old IM Building.
Sun Day sheds light
Ql state's power needs

Police apprehend
eseaped rapist

LANSING (UPI) - On a day
made to order for the occasion,
Michigan's capital rang yesterday
with variations on one theme - that
we cannot continue to depend so
lavishly on fossil fuels.
Sun Day devotees began the day
by watching the sun rise from the
steps of the State Capitol.
THE SUN BEAMED down
strongly on a variety of alternative
energy exhibits on the Capitol lawn
marking an observance of the
ultimate, but neglected, energy
source.
Several speeches were made
citing a need for closer attention to
energy problems. They were broad-
cast with electricity provided by
volunteers pumping a bicycle-driven.
generator.

Gov. William Milliken, who
opened the Sun Day celebration, told
a handful of onlookers on the Capitol
grounds that solar energy "is a
resource for tomorrow, but it is also
a resource for today.
"A RECENT REPORT by the
President's Council on Environmen-
tal Quality stated that solar energy
could meet 25 per cent of this
nation's energy demand by the year
2000 and 50 per cent by the year
2020," said Milliken.
Shortly afterwards, William Ralls,
a┬░Democratic candidate for gover-
nor who served on the Michigan
Public Service Commission for six
. years, said the state's energy needs
could best be met if that agency
were abolished.
See SUN, Page 13 -

By TOM O'CONNELL
A convicted rapist who had been the
object of an intense manhunt since he
escaped from jail last Sunday has been
taken into custody.
Anthony Wooten, 21, was taken into
custody by Ann Arbor police at about
7:30 p.m. yesterday at a house at 902
Packard. Wooten broke out of
Washtenaw County Jail by scaling a 15-
foot wall during a morning exercise
period.
POLICE AUTHORITIES say they ac-
ted on information from an outside
source in capturin Wooten. However,
two witnesses to the incident say that
Wooten turned himself in.
Wooten arrived at the house on
Packard around 3 p.m. according to
resident Dwayne Hight. Hight's lan-
dlord, Curlee Edwards, was there at the
time doing repair work. Wooten was
apparently looking for Edward's son,
an acquaintance of his who had moved
out the previous day.
Edwards said Wooten expressed a
desire to turn himself in, but was afraid
the bolice would shoot him if they saw
him on the street.

"WHAT CAN YOU do when
somebody comes to you?"Edwards
asked. "It leaves you in a spot. So I told
him, 'There's a phone in there if you
want to call the police. The line's
open'."
Edwards said Wooten claimed he had
not received justice from the law.
Wooten wrote a letter explaining his
problem and expressing his desire to
surrender, which Edwards then mailed
to the Poverty Law Center in Mon-
tgomery, Alabama. Edwards is a
member of the center.
Edwards and Hight were outside the
house when police arrived. Hight, said
10-12 heavily armed officers surroun-
ded the residence.
Edwards then asked one of the of-
ficers if Wooten had called them. Both
Edwards and Hight say the officer's
reply was affirmative.
Police authorities deny that Wooten
made the call.
EDWARDS SAID HE then told the of-
ficers, "The guy is there. He's unar-
med. I'll bring him out."
See POLICE, Page 10

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan