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May 20, 1978 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-05-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 6-Saturday, May 20, 1978-The Michigan Daily
TWO-CENT JUMP:
Postage rates rise
the National Association of Greeting MOST OF THE meeting was held
Card Publishers challenged it in the behind closed doors, and the votes
U. S. Court of Appeals in were not conducted until a few
Washington. The greeting card minutesafter reporters were ad-
group had supported the citizens' vised they should go to lunch. They
rate. had been waiting for a decision for
Under government rate-setting several hours.
procedures, the Postal Service Postal Service officials and others
recommends rate changes to the at the meeting said they also were
Postal Rates Commission, an in- confused by an apparent about-face
dependent agency. After the com- on whether to make a final attempt
mission acts, its proposed rates are to save a proposal for a "citizens'
forwarded to the board of governors rate" cheaper than the charge for
for final approval. business.
Yesterday's board meeting was The higher rates are expected to
cloaked in secrecy and was con- bring in an additional $1.9 billion a
fusing to spectators, including postal year to the deficity-plagued mail
officials present. agency.

Report advises that
new 'U' hospital be
built on existing site

I

,: Wng i t I L'.KAAl5LILA!nuAIE~I 101CPEM5

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DAILY EARLY BIRO MATINEES -- Adulits $1.2S
DISCOUNT IS FOR SHOWS STARTING BEFORE 1:30
MON. thru SAT. 10 A.M. tit 1:3b P.M. SUN. & HOLS. 12 Noon til 1:30 P.M.

EVENING ADMISSIONS AFTER 5:00, $3.50 ADULTS
Monday-Saturday 1:30-5:00, Admission $2.50 Adult and Students
Sundays and Holidays 1:30 to Close, $3.50 Adults, $2.50 Students
Sunday-Thursday Evenings Student & Senior Citizen Discounts
Children 12 And Under, Admissions $1.25
TICKET SALES
1. Tickets sold no sooner than 30 minutes
prior to showtilne. ,
2. No tickets sold later than 15 minutes
after showtime.
"Hooray for Jill Clayburgh! She makes
the jump to star in this marvelous film."
12:45
3:45
7:15
up. 9:45
R
.u
:15
4:00
6:45
9:15
WALTER MATTHAU ART CARNEY
GLENDA JACKSON RICHARD BENJAMIN 0
NEIL SIMON'S 1:00
4:15
THE GOODBYE GIRL 7
Richard Dreyfuss Marsha Mason PG

According to the panel of hospital
administrators who addressed the
Regents, the building now called
University Hospital would not be
destroyed but also would not serve as a
hospital facility.
In the report, the Regents are asked
to consider the type of service the new
facility would provide. This was done
by rendering four theoretical models
which illustrate types of basic patient
care.
Model A consists of 80 percent ter-
tialry, or specialied care, and 20 per-
cent primary and secondary service
(more general care), with a total of 647
beds.
Model B: 75 percent tertiary care, 24
percent primary or secondary, 617 beds
total.
Model C: 66 percent tertiary care, 34
percent primary or secondary, with 572
beds.
Model D: 60 percent tertiary care, 40
percent primary or secondary and 522
beds.
REGENT THOMAS Roach (D-
Detroit) pointed out that Southeastern
Michigan was an area considered to
have an over-abundance of hospital
beds. He questioned the need for a new
hospital with more beds.
The Executive Board's answer was
contained in the report, which states
that although both occupancy and
length of stay in hospitals have been
going down, the population is aging.
According to the report this means
"that the incidence of health problems
and hospitalization is almost certain to
rise.''
The board also defended its position
by pointing out projected demographic
changes in southeastern Michigan,
where the greater majority of the
hospital's patients come from. The
projections indicate a future population
increase.
THE FINAL decision the Regents
make on the hospital's size will be
based on financial criteria. Another
important factor in the decision will be
the University's motive for operating a
hospital.
The University currently maintains
the hospital primarily as a training
ground for health science students, with
emphasis on education and research.
However, the hospital must also per-
form services beyond mere training in
orer to remain solvent.
Regent David Laro (R-Flint) asked
the Hoard if the new hospital would be
an "international or national leader in
certainareas of medicine."
John Gronvall, dean of the Medical

School, said that is "a desire of the
medical school." He said the hospital is
already developing specialty in
cardiology and cancer research and is
recruiting new staff members with the
idea of bringing the University to the
top.
RECOMMENDATIONS concerning
bed size and the character of patient
service will be presented to the Regents
in 60 days, according to the report. But
as Fleming emphasized to the Board
yesterday, all future planning will be
based on the assumptions in the report.
In other action considered publicly by
the Regents yesterday, the annual
faculty promotions were approved. The
promotions will not be released until
Monday in order to allow those
promoted to be notified first.
But figures released yesterday by the
University show that the University is
paying greater attention to women and
minorities in granting promotions.
THE FIGURES indicate that of the
147 faculty members promoted to
assistant, associate or full professors,
more women and minority members
were recommended than last year.
Women represent 21.8 percent of those
promoted as opposed to 16.9 percent
promoted last year. With minorities,
this year 11.6 percent were promoted in
comparison to 6.2 percent last year.
In regards to affirmative action, the
Regents decided to postpone discussion
of Gwen Baker's (Director of Affir-
mative Action . Programs)
replacement.
Baker, whose resignation becomes
effective July 1, 1978, is leaving the
University to take a position with the
National Institute of Education in
Washington, D.C. The postponement on
choosing Baker's replacement was due
to lack of time, and the issue will be
placed on the Regents' June meeting
agenda.
STABILE
NEIGHBORHOOD
KANSAS CITY, 'Mo. (AP) - A
mammoth stabile sculpture by artist
Alexander Calder has been installed
in the middle of the modern $350-
million Crown Center development
here.
The museum-quality piece, 18 feet
high, 22 feet long and 16 feet wide, is
named Shiva, after the Hindu god of
reproduction and destruction.
In the near future Shiva will be
joined by additional art works, all of
which will be placed on a 10-acre,
landscaped square in the new devel-
opment,

LOUIS XULLE'S
I
rm.
FMPP-Ipmuk

1:00
3:30
6:30
9:00

CINEMA I
ZABRISKIE POINT
40 Director-MICHELANGELO ANTONIONI-1970 'P
In his first American film, Antonioni paints a disturbing and
somewhat vicious picture of the U.S. His portrait of a young
revolutionary delineates the radical and straight cultures
that coexist in the U.S., and is one of the few serious cine-
matic attempts to deal with the turbulent 1960's. With music
by Pink Floyd, Jerry Garcia, and Kaleidescope. Starring ROD
TAYLOR, DARIA HELPRINMARK FRECHETTE.
$1.50 7:30 & 9:30 Aud. A, Angell Hall
Thursday: PERFORMANCE, Roeg,,1968

s ,KEITH CARRADINE
SUSAN SARANDON
BROOKE SHIELDS

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