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May 18, 1978 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-05-18

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, May 18, 1978-Page 3

City
focuses on
alcohol
awareness
By JUDY RAKOWSKY
An occasional drink at the end of
the day or during the holidays is the
association most people have with
alcohol. But the perils of alcohol abuse
were what Mayor Louis Belcher had in
mind when he declared this week
Alcohol Awareness Week.
"We want to make people more
aware of the dangers of alcohol abuse
and of the fact that it is a treatable
disease," said Myra Breakey of the
Washtenaw Council on Alcoholism.
THE COUNCIL sponsors programs
on alcoholism education, therapy,
family counseling and drunk driving. It
also has an information-education
program to speak to interested
organizations.
The group's major objective is to
rehabilitate chronic and problem
drinkers, of which there are over 6,000
in Washtenaw County, and alert them
to the fact that alcohol is a dangerous
drug.
Breakey pointed out that many
students are problem drinkers. "They
may be out partying and then go to
drive home and that's bad news," she
said.

BE CAUTIOUS WHEN reaching for that bottle-this is Alcohol Awareness Week,
Regents may raise parking fees

By RENE BECKER
The Regents, meeting today at the
University's Dearborn campus, will
discuss a proposed increase in staff
parking permit fees in Ann Arbor and
giving a Uniyersity-owned
astronomical observatory dome to
Case-Western Reserve University.
As part of their monthly meeting the
Regents will hold a one-day session in
the Fair Lane Conference Center in
Dearborn. The Regents will hear repor-
ts and discuss matters related to the
Dearborn Campus including a research
and development report.
JAMES BRINKERHOFF, University
vice-president for financial affairs, will
ask the Regents to approve a plan to in-
crease staff paid parking permit fees.
The plan, if accepted by the Regents,
would raise the present fee of $50 to $60
effective September 1, 1978. The
parking fee would jump $10 every year
until 1980 when it would level at $80 per
year.

The Regents will also decide the fate
of the Peach Mountain astronomical
observatory dome. The observatory is
located 10 miles west of campus and
was built in 1949 to house the Univer-
sity's Curtis Schmidt telescope.
BUT, IN 1967 the telescope was noved
to the Cerro Tolodo Inter-American Ob-
servatory in Chile. Another Curtis
Schmidt telescope owned by Case-
Western Reserve University in
Cleveland, is currently being moved to
Kitt Peak, Arizona.
Case-Western has asked the Univer-
sity to donate its dome to the new Kitt
Peak facility. University astronomers
would have access to the facilities in
Arizona and Chile - both strategic ob-
servation points, according to
Astronomy department faculty.
Donation of the University's dome is
contingent upon Case-Western's
payment for removal, shipping, in-
stallation and replacement of the Peach
Mountain building roof.

Besides other minor construction
proposals and reports, the Regents will
also discuss faculty appointments in-
cluding reappointing Albert
Keneworker three-year term as chair-
man of the Center for Chinese Studies.

See CITY, Page 8
ATA studies shelters

By JUDY RAKOWSKY
The Ann Arbor Transit Authority
(AATA) board voted last night to move
ahead on plans for an indoor bus shelter
to be built at the corner of Fourth and
William.
Last night's unanimous resolution
calls for an investigation into the
feasibility of a structure which would
be built using part of an existing
parking structure on the corner.
THE BOARD must now hire an ar-
chitect to develop plans and attain city

permission to use part of the parking
structure for the building.
The board is also considering a plan
which would create a shelter at the cor-
ner of Fourth and Washington. An ar-
chitect presented plans for a $16,000
structure at last night's board meeting.
However, the buses would still stop at
the corner of Fourth and William and
passengers would have to walk almost
two blocks to catch their bus.
BOARD MEMBER Joyce
See AATA, Page 7

--today-
No hurry
We said last week that Robben Fleming would
resign his post as University president by 1980.
During an unrelated interview yesterday, however,
the president mentioned that since he is only 61, he
won't be of retirement age until 1981. Fleming
reiterated yesterday his plans to leave before that.
time. Apologies are in order. We didn't mean to be
hasty.
Happenings ...
... you'll have to go to great lengths -
literally - to find anything happening today. The
Regents hold their public meeting at 2 at the
University's Dearborn campus' Fairlane Conferen-
ce Center. The public comments session will follow
at 4:30 ... meanwhile, back on the home front, the
Interfaith Council for Peace meets at King of Kings
Church, 2685 Packard, to discuss "Hunger in
Washtenaw County." There will be a film at 5:45 en-
titled "The Poisioning of Michigan," followed by a
vegetarian potluck supper at 6:30. At 7:30, there will
be a talk by Linda King, Food Stamp outreach coor-
dinator for Washtenaw County and Marcia

Barrabee, field representative from the WIC
Nutritional Supplement Program ... there's more
to satiate your hunger at 8 when Hillel holds an ice
cream social. That's at 1429 Hill.
The buck stops here
A Minneapolis man tried to pass the buck once too
often and found himself in the slammer. A com-
plaint filed in U.S. District Court there Monday
charged Michael Beaulieu, 49, with intent to
defraud the government. It seems some bills
Beaulieu tried to pass were produced on a copying
machine. What's more, the machine made only
black and white copies. You'd have thought
Beaulieu would have given up after unsuccessfully
trying to pass one of the phony bills to a Min-
nneapolis bartender Saturday night. But Beaulieu
apparently didn't learn his lesson and tried the
same stunt at the same watering hole the next night.
That's when bartender Ray Rachor quit being so
understanding and called authorities.

Hog wild
Six vandals who made pigs of themselves are still
on the loose-and their owner could end up in the
pokey. The culprits-six large, white pigs-escaped
from their pen in a residential section of Buena
Vista Township near Saginaw early Tuesday and
headed out for breakfast. The porkers romped
through several yards, trampling grass and rooting
up flowers. Police say the breakfast binge caused
"extensive damage" to lawns over a two-block
area. The pigs' owner, Brian Newson, was ordered
to appear in court on charges of keeping prohibited
animals and al'wing the critters to run loose. He
faces a maximum penalty of $500 and 90 days in jail.
Newson might be out six pigs as well. As of yestr-
day afternoon, a police spokeswoman said, "the
suspects were still outstanding."
On the outside. .
Break out the Coppertone and polish the
sunglasses. Today should bring more of this
Honolulu-like weather with a high of 74' and a low of
50'. Friday the mercury should soar all the way up
to78*.

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