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August 10, 1977 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-08-10

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Wednesday, August 10, 1917

t rit mvu i - IAIN L/t\i LY

raoge deverl

Canal agreement near Demonstration marks

PANAMA CITY () - Pana-
sianian and U. S. nisgotiators
worked yesterday to put the
finishing touches on an agree-
ment in principle to give Pana-
ma control of the Panama Ca-
nal. President Carter mean-
iw hile urged congressmen to
hold off criticism until they
ee the pact.
U. S. negotiators Ellsworth
Bunker and Sol Linowitz re-
sumed talks in the afternoon
with their Panamanian counter-
parts in what observers describ-
ed as an atmosphere of opti-
mism and comraderie. They
were reported in agreement on
all major issues, and working
out details.
SOURCES ON both sides of
the negotiating tble have said
the delegates may initial an
agreement on principles today,
the iast day of Linowitzs term
as special ambassador. The re-
ports have not been officially
confirmed.
Reliable sources said the
talks are moving along simul-
taneously on the conceptual
agreement and on the, draft
treaty itself. They said it was
"possible, but not probable"
that approval could be reached
on the treaty in the current
routid of talks.
lack youths
arrested in
S Africa
JO H A N N E S B U R G,
South Africa (UPI) - The stu-
dent boycott of South Afrita's
black schools spread yesterday
and police said more than a
score of youths were arrested
(iug scattered incidents of
tck throwing.
At least 1,500 students left
lasses yesterday at Mamalong
high School in Brakpan town-
ship 10 miles east of Johannes-
burg, said Maj. Gen. Dawid
Kriel, in charge of riot control
in South Africa.
KRIEL SAID the youths
stoned passing traffic, damag-
ing two government vehicles.
Tere were no arrests and no-
shots fired. Kriel said the stu-
dents scattered when riot police
arrived on the scene.
At nearby Kwathema town-
ship, 21 students were arrested
by police who dispersed a
crowd of 400 students simply by
appearing on the scene, Kriel
said. The crowd had stoned a
school building but caused no
damage, he said.
THE STUDENT strikes pro-
testing South Africa's segre-
gated "Bantu" school system
resulted in only a 15 to 20 per
cent school attendance in West
Rand, which includes the huge
Soweto black township.
In Pretoria's black town-
ships thousands of students left
classes early and others
refused to go. The boycott was
also . in force at Attridgeville
and police reported attendance
at Saulsville's 29 schools was
"very weak,"
"We want to find the stone
throwers, arsonists and ordi-
nary criminals," Kriel said.
An argument is where' two
people are trying to get the last
word in first.

The sources said negotiators
want to have a treaty ready
for the U. S. Congress when it
returns friom recess in Septein-
ber.
THE ANTICIPATED pact
has already come under attack
from some U. S. legislators,
and Carter's spokesman Jody
Powell reported that the Presi-
dent sent messages to all mem-
bers of the Rouse and Senate
telling them the negotiators
are moving along and it looks
like we're going to have a
pretty decent treaty if things
keep going the way they are."
Carter asked the legislators
'not to get themselves com-
mitted on this thing until you
have a chance to talk to me,"
Powell told newsmen in Plains,
Ga.
The treaty is expected to pro-
vide for gradual transfer of the
canal and the adjacent Canal

Zone to Panama by the year
2000, along with a sharp in-
crease in U. S. compensatigon
and aid to Panama.
TIHE CURRENT pact, signed
in 1903, gives the United States
nerpettial control over the 50-
stile long, U. S.-built waterway
t-nkng the Pacific and the At-
s;tic Oceans.
Sources close to the negotia-
tions said the treaty will be
paired with a "neutrality ac-
cord" by which Panama will
declare the waterway open to
all nations.
Duspite Carter's call for con-
gressional restraint, some leg-
islators have already opened
fire on the proposed pact.
Sen. Strom Thurmond, (R-S.
C.). told a luncheon in Colum-
bia, S.C., on Monday: "The ca-
nal is ours, and we bought and
we paid for it and we should
keep it."

bombing anniversary

WASHINGTON ) -- Seven-
teen persons were arrested
yesterday as they marked the
32nd anniversary of the atom
iombing of Nagasaki by throw-
ing blood and ashes on Penta-
gon steps and blocking access
to the Defense Department's
heaciquarters.

i'titiinlstlti sitng ntcea iwea-
lions aind tuiclear tier.
SISsisiimlSt itini, svhim iva
idetitifietl as a mitok with the
Buddhist teinmile in Washington,
stut'ed fix dly at the Pentagon
is ihe slrack a fan like instrm-
met with a stick in a gesture
of ipparent mourning.

ABOUT 50 demonstrators ga- 'TIe demotnstrsitors dispersed
thered from a variety of organ- about midday.

AN% AU0U r IL A IC-0
Wednesday, August 10
VISIONS OF EIGHT
(1973) 7 & 9-AUD. A
A spendid documentary of the 1972 Olvmpic Games in Munich.
VISIONS OF EIGHT, so named because eiht of the world's
top directors (including Arthur Penn, Mai Zetterlino, Milos For-
man, John Schlesinqer, and Claude Lelouch) each picked an
event to film, is an excitinq cinematic event even if you don't
like sports. Dazzling camera work. Come see how each director
interprets each event through his/her cinematic style. Other
directors include lKon Thikawa, Michael Phleahar, Juri Ozerov.
ADMISSION: STILL ONLY $1.25
NOW SHOWING
Today at 1-3-5-7-9:00
All seats $1.25 till 5:00
UNDER 18 NOT ADMITTED
I.D. reauired
SECOND HIT WEEK
SHOWS TODAY AT
1-3-5-7-9 Open 12:45
All seats $1.25 till 500
7* E S SEAMAENEYEAR MLIE ANDEYEAR WILOE
LAST TWO DAYS!
SHOWN TODAY AT
1:00-3:40-6:20-9:00
Open 12:45
All seats $1.25 till 5:00
Unde Ys

Staring
MARK HAMILL HARP SON FORD CADRE FISF
10:10 AND 10:40 SHOWS $1.25 ALL OTHERS $3.50
NO DISCOUNTS NO PASSES

LAMDNT JO * "s01h. ONE OIiK
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